8-25-freshmen-service-project.jpgWaynesburg University’s incoming freshman class participated in a service project at Ryerson Station State Park Saturday, Aug. 23. CONSOL Energy sponsored the event, providing the necessary tools as well as long sleeved t-shirts for volunteers. Sherwin-Williams and the Salvation Army also provided tools and materials for the volunteers’ use.

The nearly 500 volunteers included upperclassmen Bonner Scholars and orientation leaders as well as University faculty and staff who served alongside the freshman class. The Bonner Scholars also honed their leadership skills by leading the freshmen groups.

Labeled with “Coming together to make a change,” the t-shirts donated by CONSOL illustrated the combined efforts of CONSOL, Waynesburg University and Ryerson Station State Park. The t-shirts were designed by Michelle Dunseath, a Waynesburg University digital design student from Donora, Pa.

Representatives from both CONSOL and Waynesburg are hopeful that this will be the first of many collaborative projects at Ryerson.

“We are proud to partner with two very important community organizations in Waynesburg for what we hope will become an annual event,” said Jessica Kearns, external relations specialist at CONSOL. “As a natural resource company, we recognize the importance of environmental management, and we practice responsible use of the land, water and air in our operational areas. This project provided us the opportunity to work together with local students to encourage civic engagement and community development.”

With the goal of raising the level of recreational experiences for people visiting Ryerson, volunteers served at various locations in the park on projects such as removing invasive plant species, staining benches and guardrails at the campground and removing litter along roads in the park.

Before heading to the park, CONSOL representatives and the president of the Waynesburg University Student Senate, Joshuah Dains of Clarksville, gave motivational talks on the importance of community engagement to the student audience.

The day ended with Park Ranger Alan Johnson thanking the students for doing a year’s worth of work in one day.

In alignment with the University’s mission of connecting faith, learning and serving, also often referred to as connecting the heart, head and hands, the first two days of Freshmen Orientation Weekend were devoted to faith and learning, with the third focusing on service through the project at Ryerson.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Matriculation_Group_20140821-200124_1.jpgWaynesburg University’s 2014-2015 academic school year officially began Thursday, August 21, with the University’s annual Matriculation Ceremony. President Douglas G. Lee and other University leaders welcomed the freshman class at the 2 p.m. ceremony in Roberts Chapel.

President Lee spoke to the class of 2018 about his own matriculation experience at Waynesburg in 1977, asking them to remember and record their feelings about the momentous day. He went on to say that each student is a reflection of the many Waynesburg University alumni who have become leaders in education, healthcare, ministry, science, politics and more, calling students to live out the University’s motto, Fiat Lux.

“Today, Waynesburg’s history becomes your heritage. Be proud, be confident. Become the light that God intends you to be,” President Lee said. “With His abundant grace, we are here to help you do that. Fiat Lux. Let there be light.”

During the ceremony, names were announced by Lanny Frattare, assistant professor of communication, and Doug Wilson, lecturer of communication.

Matriculation marks the beginning of an eventful weekend organized to introduce freshmen to their new home at Waynesburg University. The incoming class will meet with faculty, participate in activities that allow them to meet other new students and attend numerous informational meetings.

The University welcomed students representing 53 different majors and a variety of different states, including but not limited to California, Colorado, Florida, Texas and Virginia.

The 2018 class includes six Scout Scholarship recipients, six Stover Scholarship recipients, 15 Bonner Scholarship recipients and one Jeffrey and Regina Taussig Ohio Honor Scholarship recipient.

The incoming class had the opportunity to participate in more than 15 different events that the Waynesburg University Admissions Office hosted throughout the year in addition to personal visit opportunities.

Jessica Sumpter, director of admissions at Waynesburg University, said that the Admissions Office staff and campus community is excited to welcome the many students with whom they aided in the college search and selection process.

“We are excited for the students to finally be able to experience all that Waynesburg University has to offer,” said Sumpter. “We could not be more thrilled that the incoming students have chosen to come to Waynesburg University!”

Freshmen moved into their residence halls Thursday, August 21. Upperclassmen will move into residence halls Sunday, August 24, and classes will begin Monday, August 25.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Beginning this fall, Waynesburg University will offer new athletic administration options through its Master of Education (M.Ed.) Program in partnership with the Western Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic League (WPIAL).

Developed in conjunction with athletic directors and coaches, the strategic curriculum will train and qualify prospective athletic directors. The program will also accredit current coaches and athletic directors, Amateur Athletic Union coaches and community coaches, among others. A 10 percent discount will be offered to individuals employed at all WPIAL schools for the first year only.

“Today’s athletic director is responsible for a wide variety of administrative duties,” said Dr. Lawrence G. Kushner, assistant professor and program director for the Graduate Education Program at Waynesburg University. “A comprehensive training program in athletic administration is long overdue in Pennsylvania.”

The National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association (NIAAA) requires athletic directors to be nationally certified through NIAAA-approved programs. The athletic administration offerings at Waynesburg University are currently in the approval process.

Main concepts within the curriculum include contemporary issues, facilities and event management, fundraising, sports budgets and fiscal practices and sports law.

The three new athletic administration options include:

  • A Concentration in Athletic Administration (15 credits)
  • An M.Ed. in Athletic Administration (30 credits)
  • An M.Ed. in Athletic Administration with Principal Certification (39 credits)

The M.Ed. in Athletic Administration with Principal Certification consists of fieldwork as well as coursework. Act 48 credits are available.

Courses within the Concentration in Athletic Administration will be offered on Saturdays at the University’s Southpointe Center. Other courses meet one night per week, Monday through Thursday, from 6 to 10 p.m., also at Southpointe. Courses are offered in eight-week accelerated sessions with year-round admission dates. The M.Ed. Program can be completed in two years or less.

The M.Ed. Program affords students the opportunity to earn graduate credits toward their Instructional II Certification. Students have the ability to choose a concentration from multiple options that will prepare them to become master teachers and school leaders. Concentrations in Online Teaching, Curriculum and Instructional Leadership and Autism Spectrum Disorders are also available.

For more information, contact Dr. Kushner at lkushner@waynesburg.edu or 724-743-2260.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Beginning this fall, Waynesburg University will offer a Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision through its reputable Graduate and Professional Studies Program.

Employment of mental health counselors and substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors is projected to grow 29 percent and 31 percent, respectively, from 2012 to 2022 – much faster than the average for all occupations, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (2014).

Growth is expected because more people have addiction and mental health counseling services covered by their insurance policies.

“Waynesburg University’s Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision Program was developed based on a national need for counselor educators,” said Dr. Scott Tracy, director of graduate programs in counseling and assistant professor of counseling at the University. “Government agencies and insurance companies have come to grips with the magnitude of mental health in America. There’s a push to have more counselors, and as a result, we need more counselor educators.”

The Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision Program will be available September 1 and can be completed in three years.

With an over-arching goal of preparing leaders for the field of counseling, the Program was designed to develop students in the Christian tradition of Waynesburg University and prepare them for leadership roles in the counseling field.

“As a University dedicated to Christian service, the founding goals of the institution closely mimic that of the counseling profession,” Tracy said. “Our Christian identity makes this program distinctive, and we will be able to say the same about future graduates.”

The program is intended to prepare individuals for employment as counselor educators in colleges and universities and as leaders in clinical mental health counseling, addictions counseling or school counseling.

“The Waynesburg University Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision Program provides doctoral students with the information and skills required to carry out scholarly research, lead organizations and create new knowledge,” said Dave Mariner, the University’s director of program development.

In addition to core doctoral classes in research, students will also have experiences in college teaching and counselor supervision.  Some advanced courses in counseling practice are also offered. The program consists of a minimum of 54 semester credits beyond the master's degree, a clinical practicum, a specialty practicum, an internship, a candidacy examination and a dissertation.

With strategic curriculum developed by the fulltime counseling faculty at the University, the Ph.D. is designed to attract experienced professionals who hold master’s degrees and who want to become leaders in the counseling field.

“Specifically, we’re targeting for leadership positions in community mental health counseling, addictions counseling and school counseling,” Tracy said.

Tracy worked with fulltime counseling faculty on the curriculum for the Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision Program. The team also received guidance from Mariner.

Waynesburg University master's degree programs in clinical mental health counseling and addiction counseling are accredited by the American Counseling Association's Council on Accreditation for Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The School Counseling and Ph.D. Counselor Education specializations are in the application phase of the accreditation process.

For more information, contact Tracy at 724-743-2259 or stracy@waynesburg.edu.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_WVSOM_LOGO2F-2F.jpgThrough an agreement between Waynesburg University and the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine (WVSOM), Waynesburg will offer a Pre-Osteopathic Medicine Track beginning in the fall 2014 semester.

The Pre-Osteopathic Medicine Track is designed for undergraduates who plan to enter the study of osteopathic medicine after completing their undergraduate degrees and who have identified WVSOM as their first choice in pursuing a medical education. 

Students apply to the track during their sophomore year. Eligible students then receive WVSOM faculty mentoring to assist them in their pre-medical development and application to the school. Students will also visit the campus of WVSOM, touring WVSOM and attending informational sessions with practicing physicians, basic scientists and osteopathic medical students. Students apply to WVSOM during their junior year.

Successful completion of the pre-osteopathic medical track requirements earns the student an expedited application review, as well as an early admission interview, from WVSOM.

“This country has a growing need for family doctors, pediatricians and other primary care physicians to serve the health care needs of its citizens,” said Malcolm Modrzakowski, associate dean of affiliated and sponsored programs at WVSOM. “This program is a way to identify and mentor undergraduates who are interested in the field of medicine.”

WVSOM is the number one medical school in the nation educating primary care physicians who practice in rural America. WVSOM is No. 3 in the nation for percentage of medical school graduates entering primary care specialties.

Primary care specialties include pediatrics, family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, and internal medicine. A doctor of osteopathic medicine may also be an anesthesiologist, cardiologist, orthopedic surgeon or urologist. Osteopathic physicians may choose any specialty, prescribe drugs, perform surgeries and practice medicine anywhere in the United States, bringing a patient-centered, holistic, hands-on approach to diagnosing and treating illness and injury.

For more information, contact Waynesburg University’s Admissions Office at 724-852-3248.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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