b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_1627.JPGDr. Shari Payne has joined Waynesburg University as vice president for enrollment, the University announced today. Payne will oversee all recruitment aspects of the admissions process.

“With 20 years of experience in admissions, financial aid and academic affairs, Dr. Payne and her innovative leadership will be a valuable asset to Waynesburg University,” said Douglas G. Lee, Waynesburg University president. “Her dedication to service and to having a positive impact on the lives of others aligns with our mission, making her a great fit for the University.” 

In her role, Payne will direct an overarching recruitment plan in order to bring a high achieving and diverse student body to Waynesburg, with the goal of maintaining the academic excellence of the University. 

Prior to joining Waynesburg University, Payne served as the vice president for enrollment management at Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, where she was responsible for student enrollment, including the recruitment of new students and the retention of continuing students. 

She previously served in various roles at Robert Morris University, including dean of engaged learning, director of academic of operations and director of financial aid. 

Payne holds an Ed.D. in higher education administration from the University of Pittsburgh, a Master of Science in communications and information systems from Robert Morris University and a Bachelor of Arts in English writing from the University of Pittsburgh. 

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_10-22-Woodward-award.JPGWaynesburg University trustee John D. Woodward Jr. received the Career Intelligence Medal on October 16, 2015, in recognition of his exemplary service to the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) for twenty-one years. 

Woodward served as a CIA operations officer for most of his career, with duty in several war zones. He also had management positions in the Agency's Directorate of Science and Technology. 

Woodward was especially commended for his work as the first Chief of Operations for the Intelligence Community's Counter Biological Weapons Program, where he succeeded in advancing the program's mission impact and relevance with respect to overseas operations and community engagement.

During his government career, he also served as the Director of Biometrics at the Department of Defense, where he spearheaded efforts to use biometric technology to identify national security threats in places such as Iraq and Afghanistan.   

Woodward retired from the CIA earlier this year. In July, he accepted an appointment as a Professor of the Practice of International Relations at the Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University in Boston, where he teaches national security-related courses.

The CIA medal ceremony was held at the Duquesne Club in Pittsburgh with Woodward’s family and friends in attendance. 

Woodward is a native of Charleroi, Pennsylvania, where his mother, Olga Woodward, a former Washington County Recorder of Deeds, still resides. He has been a Waynesburg University trustee since 2010.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_David-Skeel.pngThe Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership will host a guest lecturer Thursday, Oct. 22, at 7:30 p.m. in Alumni Hall. University of Pennsylvania Law School Professor David Skeel will lead a lecture titled, “True Paradox: How Christianity Makes Sense of Our Complex World.”

Skeel will also lead a forum in conjunction with Judge Gary Glazer of the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas at 3 p.m. on Oct. 22 on the 3rd floor of the Stover Campus Center. Admission to both events is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend.

Skeel’s lecture will explore the idea that Christianity can explain many of the puzzles of human existence, such as humans’ capacity for idea-making and their inability to create a just social order. Compared with other belief systems, Skeel argues, Christianity provides a more comprehensive framework for understanding human life. He supports the notion that, even in the contemporary world, God can make sense of the complexities of human life.

During the afternoon forum, “Thinking about Law School?,” Skeel and Glazer will describe the law school experience, various specialties in law school and what it is like to practice law. Students will find this afternoon forum to be an informative discussion for those considering law school.

“Professor Skeel and Judge Glazer will explore critical issues relating to ethics and law, which will guide Waynesburg University students to become effective civil leaders,” said Dr. Lawrence M. Stratton, director of the Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership and the assistant professor of ethics and constitutional law. 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Judge-Gary-Glazer.pngProfessor David Skeel is the S. Samuel Arsht Professor of Corporate Law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Professor Skeel teaches courses on corporate law, bankruptcy, sovereign debt, poetry and the law, and Christianity and the law. He is the author of “The New Financial Deal: Understanding the Dodd-Frank Act and Its (Unintended) Consequences” and “True Paradox: How Christianity Makes Sense of Our Complex World,” as well as numerous articles, books and other publications.  Professor Skeel earned his Bachelor of Arts from the University of North Carolina and his Juris Doctorate from the University of Virginia.

Judge Glazer is a judge of the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, where he has served as a trial judge in the Criminal and Civil Divisions. Prior to joining the court in 1991, Judge Glazer served as an Assistant United States Attorney, where he was the chief of the Fraud Section. He also spent time practicing law at private firms in Philadelphia and Chicago. Judge Glazer earned his Bachelor of Arts from The Ohio State University and his juris doctorate from Case Western Reserve University.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_3676.jpgThe Boy Scouts of America’s (BSA) General Greene District of the Laurel Highlands Council presented Waynesburg University President Douglas G. Lee with its 2015 Good Citizen Award today.

Each year, the award honors an individual in the community who has enriched the region through dedication and commitment to the values of Scouting.

Lee’s involvement with BSA began in 1970, when he became a member of Boy Scout Troop 420. He became an Eagle Scout on March 22, 1975. His Eagle Scout service project consisted of working with veterans at a veterans nursing facility. He later served as Assistant Scoutmaster.

He has served on The Mountaineer Area Council, BSA, where he chaired the council’s first program to create an endowment fund, and has continued his love of Scouting through supporting the many local and regional Scouting events hosted and sponsored by Waynesburg University each year.

Initiatives at Waynesburg include the University’s annual Merit Badge University, an event that brings more than 300 Scouts to Waynesburg to earn merit badges while being exposed to a wide spectrum of academic disciplines by qualified faculty and staff.

The University also offers two resident camps each year, STEM Camp, during which Scouts earn merit badges in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math, and a Life-to-Eagle Camp, where Scouts who are at least Star rank can earn merit badges and work on their Eagle portfolio in the school’s state-of-the-art computer lab.

Additionally, through the Waynesburg University Scout Scholarship, incoming students who are Eagle Scouts, Girl Scout Gold Award recipients and Venturing Silver or Summit Award recipients can receive up to $2,000 over the course of four years for their accomplishments within Scouting.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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The Department of English and Foreign Languages at Waynesburg University will hold a Creative Writing Workshop for high school students in grades nine through twelve Friday, Nov. 13, at 10 a.m. with check-in at 9:30 a.m. The deadline for registration is Friday, Oct. 9.

The event will feature Julia Paganelli, a poet and Waynesburg University alumna who is currently pursuing a master’s degree at the University of Arkansas.

The goal of the Creative Writing Workshop is to give high school students the opportunity to engage their imaginations and strengthen their writing skills through writing exercises provided by workshop facilitators.

Activities will include two workshops facilitated by Department of English and Foreign Languages faculty and students. During the student workshops, teachers will attend a workshop facilitated by Paganelli. Following the workshops, there will be a luncheon and student reading. The cost per student is $5. 

Paganelli is the author of a poetry chapbook, Blush Less, which focuses on the lives of young women in Appalachia. Other recent publications include poetry in Hobart, The Madison Review, BOAAT, Connotation Press and The Chautauqua Literary Journal.

Her work with the Bonner Program at Waynesburg greatly influenced her writing about Appalachia, as did her work with the Greene County Food Security Partnership.

Paganelli holds a bachelor’s degree in creative writing from Waynesburg University.

For more information, contact Amy Randolph at 724-852-3430 or by email at arandolp@waynesburg.edu.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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