b2ap3_thumbnail_Monogram Small.jpgBefore traveling home for Waynesburg University’s Thanksgiving break, three students and one faculty member will stay on campus to serve the local community.

The group will spend Friday, Nov. 22, through Wednesday, Nov. 27, partnering with Greene County Habitat for Humanity for various daily projects.

Evan Kephart, interim coordinator of University’s Bonner Scholar Program, will lead the team.

“Our main goal is to expose students attending the trip to the poverty that exists around them in Greene County and inspire them to continue to give back to the community even after the project is over,” Kephart said.


Students participating in the service week include:
•    Heather Connors, a junior forensic science major from Scottdale, Pa. (Southmoreland High School)
•    Justin Johnson, a senior business management major from Washington, Pa. (home schooled)
•    Kyle Oland, a senior public relations major from Westminster, Md. (Winters Mill High School)

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_11-5stover2.jpgb2ap3_thumbnail_Monogram Small.jpgWaynesburg University’s Stover Scholars had a whirlwind tour of Washington, D.C., visiting major political and legal leaders on Thursday, Oct. 31 and Friday, Nov. 1, 2013.  The 21 undergraduates had sessions with U.S. Senator Robert Casey; Associate U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia; National Public Radio Correspondent Mara Liasson; Georgetown University Law Center Professor Charles F. Abernathy; Institute for Justice constitutional litigator Scott Bullock; former Congressman David McIntosh; and political activist Wesley Goodman.

Just after voting on the Senate floor on two cloture votes, Senator Casey stressed his ongoing quest to overcome partisanship and encouraged the students to pursue lives of public service.  Justice Scalia told the students that America is free because of the U.S. Constitution’s structural protections of checks and balances and the Separation of Powers even more so than the Bill of Rights.  He urged the students to continually re-read the Federalist Papers, which should be “dog-eared on your desk.”  At the new headquarters of National Public Radio, Mara Liasson described her career path in radio journalism and emphasized nurturing the skill of writing succinctly and clearly, which she mastered by providing five minute news summaries on NPR for over a decade.  She also assessed America’s current state of political polarization and the need for leaders to bring America together. 

The students also participated in a Civil Procedure class at Georgetown University Law Center taught by constitutional scholar Charles F. Abernathy, who later provided insights to the students about pursuing legal careers. Former Congressman, White House lawyer and Mayer Brown Partner David McIntosh, a co-Founder of the Federalist Society, urged the students to take up the mantle of leadership to preserve the U.S. Constitution’s values, which he views as the best hope for freedom in the world. Scott Bullock, the lead constitutional litigator in the 2005 U.S. Supreme Court case, Kelo v. New London, described his public interest legal practice of strategically enhancing property rights protections. Wesley Goodman, leader of the Conservative Action Project, encouraged the Stover Scholars to “talk about the American dream again” as they pursue public leadership. The students also visited the U.S. Senate Gallery and toured both the Library of Congress and U.S. Supreme Court.

“The Stover Scholars met with major players in the Washington, D.C., political scene and critically engaged with them in meaningful and substantive constitutional discussions,” said Dr. Lawrence M. Stratton, Director of the Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral b2ap3_thumbnail_11-5stover1.jpgLeadership and Assistant Professor of Ethics and Constitutional Law. “The political and legal leaders we visited thoroughly appreciated the Stover Scholars’ positive spirit,” Stratton continued.

“Meeting with several political and judicial leaders on this trip and hearing their insights on the future of this country, through various ups and downs, gave me hope for what is yet to come,” said Patrick Kopas, senior pre-law major from Fairchance, Pa. 

“The D.C. trip was a great experience because we were able to meet those in the Nation’s Capital who you hear and read about. Meeting Senator Casey, Justice Scalia, NPR’s Mara Liasson, constitutional lawyer Scott Bullock, and many more political leaders put faces to names. It was fascinating to pick their brains,” said Andrew Stanko, freshman sports broadcasting major from Lewisburg, Pa.

“Justice Scalia was both down to earth and extraordinarily wise simultaneously, exactly the way a Supreme Court Justice should be,” said Matthew Kenney, sophomore computer science major from Northumberland, Pa.

Nika Anschuetz, sophomore electronic media major from Zelionople, Pa., said, “Scott Bullock renewed my faith in legal activism on behalf of property rights which is what the Institute for Justice is doing.”

b2ap3_thumbnail_11-5stover3.jpg“Justice Scalia’s assessment of the current state of the polis could not have been more accurate. His acute understanding of the role of the Constitution in society, what is going on, and what is to be done was most thought provoking and formative,” said Daniel Czajkowski, senior criminal justice and political science major from Frederick, Md. 

Chase Ayers, senior pre-law major from Charleroi, Pa., commented, “This trip has inspired me to pursue the causes I hold most dear despite opposition.”

Waynesburg University’s Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership explores national and international issues in the context of constitutional law and Christian ethics with the objective of creatively transforming the polis.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Waynesburg University’s American Chemical Society (ACS) student chapter was recently selected to receive the “Outstanding Chapter Award” from the American Chemical Society for the fourth consecutive year. The award is a result of the chapter’s activities conducted during the 2012-13 academic year.

More than 367 student chapter annual activity reports were reviewed by the Society Committee on Education (SOCED). As a result of the reports, 263 awards were given, including 53 “Outstanding,” 85 “Commendable,” and 125 “Honorable Mention” awards. Waynesburg University was one of only 53 chapters selected to receive the “Outstanding Award.”

Under the direction of Dr. Robert LaCount, professor emeritus of chemistry at Waynesburg University, and Dr. Evonne Baldauff, assistant professor of chemistry and chair of the Department of Chemistry at Waynesburg University, the ACS student chapter was highly involved in campus and community outreach activities throughout the year.

Activities included monthly labs for homeschooled students, a Haunted Lab open to the campus and local community and the Food Chemistry and Green Chemistry programs offered to local Girl Scout members, among many others. Student chapter members also provide service to the department, work to foster community within the group through social events offered throughout the academic year, and participate in National Chemistry Week including volunteering at ChemFest at the Carnegie Science Center and hosting the Periodic Table of Cupcakes on campus.

According to Baldauff, this award is substantial because it represents the efforts of the Department of Chemistry.

“This award is emblematic of the service-oriented spirit of students at Waynesburg University,” Baldauff said. “Our ACS students put in countless hours in planning and organizing these outreach events simply because they want to educate and excite others about science. I could not be more proud of their accomplishment.”

The congratulatory letter from ACS President Dr. Miranda Li Wu read as follows: “Professors Evonne Baldauff and Robert LaCount, faculty advisors of the chapter, deserve special commendation. Few faculty members are willing to make the great commitment of time and energy that successful chapter requires. Professor Baldauff and Professor LaCount’s efforts certainly represent the best in undergraduate science education and mentoring around the country.”

For more information, contact Baldauff at 724-852-3617.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Waynesburg University’s student-run radio station, WCYJ-FM, hosted its annual Pumpkin Bowling event in conjunction with Harvest Fest put on by the University’s Student Senate Thursday, Oct. 31.

According to junior sports broadcasting student Brandon Rainelli, the general manager of WCYJ-FM, it was the 21st time the radio station hosted one of the campus’s favorite events.

“Pumpkin Bowling has been a Waynesburg tradition for some time now,” said Rainelli. “It is the biggest event [WCYJ-FM] puts on each year.”

While normal bowling consists of a bowling ball, Pumpkin Bowling substitutes the ball for a pumpkin. Participants bowl just as they do in normal bowling, except it’s outside and with a five-pound, orange sphere.

Rainelli said the money raised goes towards the radio station’s annual fundraising efforts for Relay for Life which takes place each year in the spring.

“[Pumpkin Bowling] is our second biggest fundraiser behind the 24-hour broadcast we do,” said Rainelli. “Last year our goal for the year was $2,500. The cause overall is great and we are increasing our goal this year.”

Waynesburg University President Douglas G. Lee, who bowled against students, said the event is a great showing of the University’s spirit of service.

“[Waynesburg] has extraordinary students,” said Lee. “These students have a real heart for service and caring for other people.”

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
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The Fall Semester Student Art Exhibition will be on display Monday, Nov. 18 through Friday, Dec. 6 in the Benedum Fine Arts Gallery on the campus of Waynesburg University. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend.

The exhibition includes the best student work produced in art courses throughout the fall semester and will showcase a variety of mediums including drawings, prints, ceramics, sculptures and a variety of two- and three-dimensional pieces. The pieces on display are selected by the Waynesburg University art faculty.

The Art Program at Waynesburg University exposes students to the creative process and provides them with practical experience in using the tools and techniques of the visual artist. Students develop self-awareness, as they find opportunities to progress according to their own abilities.

Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, or by appointment. For more information, call 724-852-3274.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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