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When Ali Hulsey found out she’d be rooming with Susie Godwin prior to the girls’ freshman year at Waynesburg University, Ali figured they’d get along. What the Bakersfield, Cal., native didn’t realize is that she and Susie, of Buckhannon, W.Va., would room together all four years and become best friends in the process. Waynesburg has a way of doing that with total strangers, and below, Ali and Susie share just how it happened to them…

 

 

 

 



Ali Hulsey

Name

Susie Godwin

Senior

Class

Senior

Bakersfield, Cal.

Hometown

Buckhannon, W.Va.

The moment I stepped on campus I knew it was where I wanted to go. The people were all so friendly, and it instantly felt like home. The Education Department was great and had a lot of wonderful people working in it. Then to top it off the idea of living in the snow seemed intriguing.

Why WU?

I heard about WU from a friend who was, at the time, attending the university.  When I visited WU, I loved the campus and the friendly people. I also knew I wanted to play soccer, and Waynesburg seemed like a good fit!

Early Childhood Development and Special Education

Major

Secondary English Education

Waynesburg University Student Ambassador, Kappa Delta Pi (education honorary),
Council for Exceptional Children,
Resident Assistant,
Yellow Jackets sports fan!

Activities at WU

Women’s Soccer, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Kappa Delta Pi, Sigma Tau Delta (English honorary), DRUS (women’s honorary), Waynesburg University Student Ambassador

We really have no idea why we were paired; it was all random. I did not even fill out a roommate match sheet.  The only thing I requested was Burns Hall, which is where we were placed, but that is the only reason we can think of.

How did you become roommates?

I am from West Virginia and my roommate is from California. We were randomly assigned as roommates freshman year and have lived together ever since. I filled out a new student form and listed Elementary Education as a potential major, so that may have influenced how we became roommates.

We have done lots of traveling together, from road trips to UNC to visit her sister, flights to California to visit my family, a mission trip to Peru, and even spontaneous drives on the back roads of Waynesburg just exploring God’s beautiful creations on a nice day with the windows down and music up.

Best memory as roommates

My best memories as roommates would have to be all the soccer games and soccer related activities we experienced together. Ali was the team’s biggest fan, and I loved the memories we created throughout the soccer seasons.

Get to know him/her for who he/she is. Moving in, I hoped Susie and I would have a good relationship and such, but I never expected her to be my best friend. As I got to know her she quickly became my best friend and someone I could truly see myself living with for the rest of my college career.

Tips for incoming freshmen
who will be roommates

I would advise to be considerate and willing to share space. I would also encourage roommates to spend time together and get to know each other, as well. Getting to know a new roommate in college can be so rewarding and can lead to a lifelong friendship. Make the most out of your college experience!

COFFEE! And a lot more coffee… here in South 312 coffee is a daily staple not just for us but for all our friends, “The South Hall Family,” who often stop in and help themselves to our coffee.

Top item(s) necessary for living in the residence halls

My roommate and I love coffee, so that is a must!

Absolutely. I couldn’t imagine my college career with any other roommate, and truthfully I don’t even want to try to image that. The memories we have had and the relationship we have developed over the last four years is a greater blessing than words can ever describe. My roommate is a part of my life that I could never change.

If you had to do it all over again, would you still live together? Why?

I would do it all over again in a heartbeat! Ali and I came to college as strangers, and after four years as roommates, I am leaving college with a best friend and memories I will cherish for a lifetime.


When asked if they had anything else to add, both Alie and Susie commented on the family-like sense of community in the residence halls. They encourage all incoming students to get to know the other residents in their hall, as they can become best friends who share unforgettable memories for four years at Waynesburg and beyond.

Upon graduation, both Ali and Susie plan to pursue their master's degree in education, and they hope to stick around Waynesburg to do so. What will come of their living situation as a result? Not surprisingly, they already have an apartment lined up together in the area. They figure, after four successful years in the residence halls, they want to see what a fifth year as roommates has in store!

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As an Admissions Counselor at Waynesburg University who’s also an alumnus, I have the privilege of sharing my experience daily with prospective students and families. One of the most often asked questions is a simple one: “What’s your favorite part about Waynesburg?”

Easy.

It’s the people.

I know, I know…cliché, right? But my parents always taught me not to lie, and if I responded with any other answer, I’d be lying. So many just good, quality people who truly embody the mission of the University walk the campus each day, and that was my favorite part about being a student and remains my favorite part as a staff member.

When I talk about my student experience, I always point to how much the faculty and staff truly care about the holistic development of each student and how much they pour into the students’ lives. Students can gain so much insight from watching faculty and staff members live their lives each day, but yesterday, for this staff member, the roles were reversed as the actions of a group of students showed me what it truly means to be a part of the Waynesburg University community.

On my way home from the Admissions Office last evening, I saw a little boy, maybe four or five years old, running on a sidewalk just off campus. At first, I didn’t think much of it. Spring had just begun a few hours earlier (although it didn’t much feel like it), and the kid just wanted to be outside. Heck, I was planning to strap on the running shoes, myself, as soon as I got home.

Then, as I was almost past the boy, I noticed his feet—shoeless. All he had on was a pair of white socks. I drove a bit further and realized there were no adults or older siblings around, either. It was then that my eyes shot down to my driver’s side mirror. In the reflection, I could see the boy attempting to flag down the next two cars that passed by. Neither stopped. At that point, I immediately proceeded to the intersection straight ahead and navigated a U-turn.

I pulled up next to the boy, rolled down my window and asked if everything was OK. It became apparent right away from the boy’s reaction that everything was not “OK.” Through tears, he forced out that his mother wasn’t home, he didn’t know where she was and he didn’t know where to go. When asked if he knew exactly where home was, he could only point in a general direction.

As I decided upon a course of action, another car pulled alongside me and asked the same question I had posed to the boy: “Is everything OK?” I explained the situation, and immediately that car, along with a third vehicle, pulled off to the side of the road in front of me. Out jumped a group of four Waynesburg University students, two guys and two girls. The girls made a beeline straight for the little boy, putting their arms around him and wrapping him in an extra sweatshirt. (In my own ignorance, I had nearly failed to realize that the boy was donning just a t-shirt in temperatures that had been dropping throughout the day.)

Moments later, we made the call to University Security, who relayed our message onto the Borough Police. Within minutes, a police officer arrived to provide assistance, followed closely by two University Security personnel.

The group of students, however, did not seem to want to depart. They hovered around the scene, wanting to ensure that the boy was returned to where he needed to be. Only after I explained that University Security had assured me they needed no further assistance from us did the group of students find it permissible to leave.

As I made the short trek home, I couldn’t help but be proud of how the group of students reacted to the situation. And I couldn’t help but draw the parallel to Jesus’s parable of the Good Samaritan in the 10th chapter of Luke. Just like the priest and Levite passed by the robbed, beaten man in Biblical times, so too did two cars pass by the lost little boy, even as he was pleading for their assistance with the waving of his arms. If I hadn’t realized my initial mistake and turned around, however, I have absolutely no doubts that the group of students would have come to the aid of that little boy, much like the Good Samaritan thousands of years earlier.

How blessed, I thought, I am to work at a University where the students possess such strong morals and Godly character.

What’s my favorite part about Waynesburg?

Easy.

It’s the people.

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The Yellow Jacket men’s basketball team is enjoying its most successful season in nearly a decade, and if you’re trying to pinpoint how they’ve been able to pull that off, you may want to start in Willison Hall—Room 605 to be exact. That’s the current home of Jacob Fleegle and Thomas Ellis, the team’s second and third leading scorers, respectively. The two started as roommates freshman year after a recommendation from their head coach Mark Christner, and they’ve been living together ever since. Recently, they shared a glimpse into their experience as roommates and even offered a word of advice for incoming students…

 

Thomas Ellis Name Jacob Fleegle
Junior Class Junior
Fresno, Ohio Hometown Jennerstown, Pa.
Christian environment, small class size, family member’s positive experience, ability to play basketball Why WU? Basketball is the main reason I came to WU. Once I came for my visit and tour, I fell
in love with it.
Small Business Management; Marketing minor Major History (Secondary Education); Political Science minor
Basketball, FCA leader,
Student Ambassador
Activities at WU Basketball, FCA, possibly golf
this spring
Coach Christner gave us each other’s numbers, and we began to text over the summer. The more we talked, the more we realized how alike we were and that rooming together would be a good idea. How did you become roommates? Coach Christner helped us to meet each other with basketball, and we were both looking for someone to room with. We have been rooming together ever since.
We overslept for our freshman Fiat Lux trip to Washington, D.C., and had to get ready in record speed to catch the bus. We were literally the last people on the seven buses that went on the trip. Best memory as roommates Helping a friend push their broken down car back to campus from McCracken Pharmacy (about ½ mile away) at midnight one night.
Have your roommate become one of your closest friends because it will make your life much easier. Tips for incoming freshmen
who will be roommates
Communicate in advance if possible to get on the same page and get to know each other in advance.
Snack food, fridge, TV Top item(s) necessary for living in the residence halls Refrigerator
Yes. Being able to live with someone that encourages and challenges me in everything I do is something I would not be able to replace. If you had to do it all over again, would you still live together? Why? Yes. We both get along greatly and are on similar schedules.  We have not had any problems as roommates.

 

When asked if he had anything else to add, Thomas quickly pointed to his freshman year experience in a traditional residence hall. "Living in Martin Hall freshman year made the transition into college much more enjoyable," he said. "The community that our floor had was awesome!"

Thomas, Jacob and the rest of the Yellow Jackets head to Bethany College this Saturday to compete in the ECAC Southwest Tournament. Waynesburg takes on Hood in a semifinal matchup, with the winner advancing to Sunday's championship. It's the first time the men's basketball program has qualified for postseason play since its 2005-06 campaign. Good luck, Jackets!

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If you’re a high school senior hoping to attend a college or university next fall, there’s a good chance it’s crunch time for you. Application deadlines or priority deadlines are looming, and you’re rushing (hopefully not too frantically…see No. 2) to get them all turned in. Here’s two handfuls of common mistakes to avoid in your haste…

10. Having mom and dad do it for you.  It’s OK to get some advice from your parents, but neither one of them should be filling out applications or writing essays for you. Colleges want to hear from YOU, not mom and dad. We know you’re busy, but you’re not that busy. (Just wait until you get to college—then you’ll realize how good you had it!)

9. Using your “clever” e-mail address and/or not checking it.  Listen up This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , we know you love the pop star, but that won’t win over most college admissions counselors. And whatever you put down as your e-mail, check it often. There may be pertinent information from your top choice waiting in your inbox.

8. Writing illegibly.  If your name, address, phone number and e-mail look more like hieroglyphics than standard English, the admissions office has no way of contacting you (whatever it guesses that your name might be).

7. Using the wrong college’s name in your essay.  Believe it or not, this happens more than you’d think. Admissions offices realize you may be re-using similar essays for similar prompts, but when you copy & paste, be sure to double check you’re using the correct college’s name.

6. Misspelling words and committing grammatical errors.  This is an easy one. Just proofread everything carefully before submitting or have someone do it for you, and you should be fine.

5. Forgetting your signature.  If an application calls for a signature, chances are the admissions office cannot process your application until they have that. Thus, if you forget your John Hancock, your application will most likely be put on hold.

4. Not sending your transcripts and test scores.  Again, in almost all cases, schools are going to need to see both your high school transcript and standardized test scores. Failure to submit these in support of your application will result in a lengthy wait for a decision.

3. Not answering optional questions.  Even though it may say optional, a university would not put a question or prompt on an application if they didn’t want students to complete that portion. Anything of the sort is an opportunity for you to separate yourself from the rest.

2. Waiting until last minute.  An admissions office is a whirlwind of a place—busy, busy, busy. Waiting until the absolute last second to turn in your application isn’t going to help your chances.

1. Lying!  If an admissions counselor discovers you’ve been untruthful in any way on your application, you can just about kiss your chances of acceptance goodbye.

Dave Floyd is an Admissions Counselor at Waynesburg University, whose travel territory includes Westmoreland County, Eastern Pennsylvania and the Northeast states. He is also a 2012 Waynesburg alumnus.

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As the college search continues for many high school students, the question of whether to attend a secular or Christian institution
may come to the forefront of the discussion. This can be a difficult topic, as students try to discern where God is leading them in the midst of such b2ap3_thumbnail_Waynesburg-University-Chapel.pngtransition and change. While individuals searching for their true calling and direction in life can certainly follow God’s will at secular schools, there are advantages to attending a Christian college or university. Here are the top three…

3. Academic instruction.  In many cases, choosing a Christian institution means choosing a smaller setting. According to collegestats.org, 817 of the country’s religiously affiliated schools have less than 5,000 students. And nearly 400 of those have less than 1,000. So what’s that mean for your academics? It means smaller class sizes, more hands-on learning opportunities and much more individualized attention from faculty. Also, often times, those professors will share the Christian perspective on the subject matters they teach (after laying out all of the facts, of course), allowing students to explore and discover in an informed manner.

2. Service opportunities.  Matthew 20:28 reads, “…the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve…”  Thus, it’s no surprise that the types of institutions that bear Christ’s name provide boundless opportunities for their students to serve the world around them. Whether it’s serving locally at Habitat for Humanity or traveling halfway across the globe to work with impoverished youth, these experiences prove life altering for so many. And the best schools will seek not only to provide these outlets at their respective institutions, but also to equip their students for a lifetime of servitude for the glory of God.

1. Students’ holistic development.  To many (including myself!), the No. 1 reason to consider a Christian college or university is the opportunity to develop holistically as a person. From top to bottom, the faculty and staff at these institutions care about so much more than just what letter goes down in the grade book. They pour their heart, soul and precious time into students to ensure that they’re not only better job prospects, but that they’re also better men and women of God. And at a time when fiscal responsibility is on the top of everyone’s priority list, that type of college experience is a value that’s worth every single penny. 

Dave Floyd is an Admissions Counselor at Waynesburg University, whose travel territory includes Westmoreland County, Eastern Pennsylvania and the Northeast states. He is also a 2012 Waynesburg alumnus.

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