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b2ap3_thumbnail_Tinnemeyer-and-students-Chapel-steps.jpgWith so many colleges and universities out there to choose from, it can be difficult to decide where all to apply. After filling out a few, you may look at the next school on your list and think to yourself, “Why should I apply here?” Well, if you’re asking that about Waynesburg University, this list is your answer! Here are the top five reasons to apply to Waynesburg:

 

5. It’s free!  Not much to explain here. If you apply online, it won’t cost you a penny!

4. Fun.  We understand you need some downtime in order to be successful academically. Whether you’re off to practice, enjoying Bingo night, taking a trip to Pittsburgh or just hanging with friends in the residence halls, you’ll never be at a loss for things to do. Oh, and traditions that students enjoy? We’ve got a bunch of those, too. Pumpkin Bowling, the Campus Community Thanksgiving Dinner, and the President’s Breakfast are but a few.

3. Achievement Awards.  Depending on where you’re at with your cumulative high school GPA and SAT/ACT scores, you could be in line for anywhere from $28,000 to $60,000 (four-year totals) in Achievement Awards. If you apply and are accepted, you’ll find out right on your acceptance letter how much, if any, you may qualify for. This, along with other Financial Aid, could help defray the total cost of attending Waynesburg, which is already almost $11,000 less than other private, four-year institutions!

2. Hands-on learning.  Hands-on learning is a staple here, and in almost every major, that starts freshman year. Whether you’re assessing injuries on the football field, analyzing blood spatter in the Forensic Science Lab or broadcasting events from the University’s remote TV truck, you won’t just be sitting in a classroom. When you are, though, it’ll only be with about 19 others. As a result, your professors will know you and invest themselves in your learning.

1. People.  Cliché? Maybe. But to so many here, the best part of Waynesburg truly is its people. Those faculty members we just mentioned, President Lee, Residence Life, Campus Ministry Assistants, coaches, and the list could go on – all here committed to our mission of Christian faith, scholarship and service, and to your holistic development as a person.

 

As you can see, no matter what your criteria, Waynesburg has something for you. Don’t wait; apply today! (Remember, it’s free!)

 

Plus, if you apply and are accepted within the next few weeks, you may also be eligible to apply for some of our Competitive Merit Scholarship Programs. You don’t want to miss out on that opportunity!

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Sherman-Colorito-for-small-liberal-arts-top-5.pngBig school, or small school? That’s the question a lot of individuals face when choosing a college. And in the long list of factors that goes into choosing a college, size and type often find themselves placed near the top in terms of importance. To help with this critical question in the college search process, here are the top five reasons to consider a small, liberal arts college or university…

5. Community.  It’s rare to walk anywhere on a smaller campus and not see someone you know. Sheer numbers play a major role in that, but so does the fact that everyone on campus seems to be involved in something. If you play a sport, host a show on the school radio station, perform in the musical and work in the bookstore, you might be a student at one of these schools. Seems like a busy life, but the camaraderie is hard to beat at larger institutions.
4. Scholarships and financial aid.  Sure, big, public universities may have a cheaper sticker price, but when it comes to the bottom line, small schools often surprise prospective students with their affordability. The combination of scholarships and need-based institutional aid, which typically isn’t available at larger colleges, makes this possible.
3. Small classes taught by professors.  Because graduate and doctoral programs are not as prevalent at smaller liberal arts schools, often times, graduate students and teaching assistants don’t exist, and if they do, they’re not in front of the classroom. Faculty members are the ones teaching the undergraduate students, and it’s almost always in a smaller setting. No 300-seat auditoriums here; you’ll know your classmates and be able to interact with them in a more intimate classroom environment.
2. Grad schools and employers value it.  As Lynn O’Shaughnessy put it in her 2010 article on cbsnews.com, “liberal arts colleges…teach kids how to think, talk and write,” and, while simple, that’s exactly what employers are looking for. Furthermore, according to O’Shaughnessy’s article, “liberal arts schools dominate the list of the top 10 institutions that produce the most students who ultimately earn doctorates.” Why is this? Graduate schools are looking for just the type of research opportunities students have at liberal arts colleges.
1. You know your professors, and they know you.  While learning from professors in small classes is great, an even bigger benefit is getting to know your professors on a personal level and gaining hands-on experience right alongside them. The connections you make with those individuals become invaluable as you search for graduate schools and/or employment. They’ve all been out there in the field doing the work themselves, and now they’re helping little ole you do the same.

 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Tyler-Dapson-photo-for-SAC-blog.jpgBeing a broadcaster takes diligence, preparation and a lot of practicing; you can’t make it in the business if you don’t know the games.

The Waynesburg University broadcasting camp, run by Lanny Frattare, is a wonderfully delightful and easy way to start your career. The camp shows you basics of the business and the basics of how to announce different sports. This experience is an excellent building block.

I know from my experience that I gained a new aspect on how this business works, how much more I can know, and how much preparation is put into each and every single program, whether it is radio play-by-play for the majors or something like a high school football game. No matter what you do, make it look and sound professional, for that portrays a good image of yourself and gives you practice and experience under your belt.

On the topic of being prepared, I began sweating profusely knowing that I had to do baseball play-by-play at the camp, for I knew I didn't know baseball that well, but I knew the basics. I calmed down after I found out that we weren’t going live, that we had a partner, and that, no matter what, the Waynesburg University broadcasting team and my newly made friends had my back.

Speaking of newly made friends, I came to the camp and instantly couldn’t help thinking, “This is going to be super awkward. I won’t get to know many of these people, and I will probably be a loner, or I will be behind in what I know.” That wasn’t the case. The group I went with was great. We all understood that some of us were new, that some people didn’t watch all sports 24/7 and that we would be friends.

Once I got in my room after stepping out of my parents car, I saw that my roommate wasn’t there. At first, I got a little excited because I thought I would have no roommate, but my roommate showed. Hs name was Tanner Widomski, and Tanner and I ended up spending a lot of time hanging out and talking. He was in the same case as I was—he was new in the broadcasting world. So some nights Tanner and I would look over pages and practice together. I honestly couldn’t ask for a better roommate. He and I were just like brothers.

All of us created a relationship with one another. We all talked sports, we all had our favorites, we all had rivals/ teams we hated, yet we all got along. Sometimes there would be heated discussions, yet we all were friends. My favorite thing about this camp was that I can honestly see these guys and girls going out and being broadcasters and announcers. I bet in as little as 10 years one of these kids will be doing the dream, making it happen.

I'd like to thank Lanny Frattare so much for this experience. Thanks, Lanny, for being a great and wonderful role model. Thank you to all the students, staff and professors who joined Lanny.

That’s the Waynesburg experience. It was unbelievable.

-Tyler Dapson
Munnsville, NY

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Screen-Shot-2014-05-12-at-4.27.16-PM.pngAt a time when higher education is under the microscope, studies abound concerning which schools place the highest percentage of students in graduate schools and jobs, which lead to the highest annual income, and the list could continue. Instead of focusing on the names of institutions, however, what about looking into what students actually do during their four years?

A recent Gallup Poll did just that, finding students who “forged meaningful connections with professors or mentors” are the same people “who feel happy and engaged in their jobs [and] are the most productive” as a result.

At Waynesburg University, 93 percent of first-year students and 91 percent of seniors rated their overall experience as “excellent” or “good,” according to the University’s 2013 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) results. Additionally, NSSE reported that Waynesburg students talked about career plans with a faculty member 28 percent more than students at other Council for Christian Colleges & Universities (CCCU) schools.

What exactly does that look like? Mike Cipoletti, Director of the Forensic Science program, said he knows every student in the program, from the freshmen to the seniors—a direct result of the University’s 14:1 student/faculty ratio. Cipoletti said the seniors spend plenty of time in his office, especially close to graduation.

"That’s why most of us are here,” he said. “We come to a small institution like this, so we can have more face time and interaction with the students. It’s not even just on the academic side of things—it’s the personal interactions, too. It’s trying to help these students figure out how to become leaders, how to become service-oriented people, how to give back to their communities, and you know, that’s the best part about it.”

Provost Dr. Jacquelyn Core agrees, citing the University’s commitment to service as another way students and faculty forge close ties with one another.

“When a student is serving right alongside a faculty member, it adds more depth to the relationship, and it’s all about that ability to form relationships,” Core said. “I also think it goes both ways because it helps faculty members to feel more invested in the students, too.”

As the survey undertaken by Gallup—which polled 30,000 graduates of all ages in all 50 states—proved, Waynesburg’s mentor-like approach to teaching, academic advising and career counseling works. And the institution’s 96 percent career path rate (for those still wondering about those buzzwords) further illustrates that point.

Students are not only furthering their education in graduate schools and obtaining jobs in their respective fields, they are excelling in whatever path they choose.

Take Ryan Devlin, for example. A 2007 Waynesburg alumnus, Devlin received the honor of Pennsylvania’s 2013 “Teacher of the Year” and also became a finalist for the 2014 National Teacher of the Year Award. He, too, cites the holistic approach to a Waynesburg education as a major factor in his success.

“[Waynesburg is] just a great place where everyone is a mentor to you, and it’s not just about having a great college professor—it’s about everyone here,” Devlin said. “One of the things that’s really unique about Waynesburg University is that it really educates the entire student.”

Part of how the University “educates the entire student,” as Devlin put it, is through the school’s liberal arts philosophy. Core, in her role as Provost, is of the opinion that this approach to education is simply invaluable.

“I truly believe that you cannot put a price tag on the type of well-rounded person you can become through a liberal arts education,” Core said. “It’s really easy outside of a liberal arts background to get pigeon-holed in your field of study. You may become an expert in that field but not get the background needed to become a good citizen in all parts of society, whether that is servant leadership, environmental stewardship or whatever that might be. I think there’s a level of knowledge with a liberal arts education that makes you more conversant in a wider range of societal issues.”

For those still interested in a few of those buzzwords and rankings mentioned above, check out http://www.waynesburg.edu/ranking to learn more about Waynesburg’s recent distinctions.

 

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Dear fellow parent,

As we jot down these rambling thoughts, the calendar has turned to May 1. In many parts of the world, it is a day of celebration. We celebrate the rule of law in our beloved country, while others celebrate military might, but in America it has another unique meaning if you are the parent of a high school senior. It is Deposit Day! A day your son or daughter commits their enthusiasm, intellect, and more than a little of the family bank account to an institution of higher learning. 

As we initial that check, we parents reflect on the joys and tribulations that preceded this day…from trying to get the volcano just right for the elementary school science fair, to chaperoning the junior high dance, to faithfully making another batch of cupcakes—usually at the last minute—for today’s PTA bake sale. We also spent a lot of time waiting. We waited patiently for soccer and marching band practice to end, we waited outside the SAT center on a chilly Saturday morning, we waited to hear footsteps a little late on a Saturday night, and we waited for the letter in the big envelope that joyously announced that one period of waiting was over and that the Waynesburg University family would be welcoming a new addition to its campus come September. We hug our sons and daughters, call for the extra-large pizza, phone Grandma, wipe away a tear, offer a prayer of thanksgiving and of course, order the sweatshirt!

Once the euphoria passes, which it does all too quickly, the adult in us begins to hear the voices, the ones with all the questions. Did we make the right choice in Waynesburg? Can we afford it? Will our children be as cherished far from home as they have been in the confines of our home, congregation and high school?

Take it from us; the answer is a resounding YES! Yes, you did make the right choice spiritually, academically and financially. Our son is days away from finishing his freshman year. He has grown physically (when did he get taller than his father?), and he has been nurtured through challenging times by caring professors, coaches, mentors and a community of other young people who embraced him, cried with him, prayed with him and refused to let him falter. He has challenged his faith and found it worthy. He has learned that he has a lot more to learn both in and out of the classroom. He has grown from a wide-eyed, nervous freshman who found himself seven hours from home into a more self-confident young man of integrity and hope. His mother and I do continue to wait, to see what God has in store for him next year.

Congratulations, parents. Celebrate your children, and celebrate the learning, loving and caring community that is Waynesburg University.

Go, Jackets!

Jim and MaryAnn Simmons

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