Amanda Machesky and Danielle McGinnis, both instructors of nursing at Waynesburg University, recently attended a Robert Wood Johnson conference and won first place for their poster presentation. 

They presented their poster, “Integrating the Movie ‘Wit’ to Depict Therapeutic and Non-Therapeutic Communication into a First Semester Nursing Course for Second Degree Nursing Students,” at the New Careers in Nursing Sixth Annual Summit. 

McGinnis, who serves as the co-faculty adviser for the Student Nurses Association of Pennsylvania Waynesburg University chapter alongside Machesky, said that the pair won the Innovative Program Design for Accelerated Students Award because their poster “truly depicted what it means to be innovative.” 

For the conference, which took place in Washington, D.C., the pair created an abstract, submitted work online and developed a poster, which they also submitted online. 

“We worked on the abstract for several months and once this opportunity presented itself, we tied up loose ends and tailored the abstract to conference requirements,” McGinnis said.

In addition to presenting their poster at the conference, Machesky and McGinnis attended breakout sessions, networking events, panels, the keynote address and workshops.

“There are many different roles you take on and responsibilities that many are not aware that are required of you as a nurse educator; this award has helped to validate what I do,” Machesky said.  “It gives merit to my teaching strategies and methods. Having earned this award as a peer-voted award helps me to recognize that things I am doing are highly valued and respected by notable nurse educators from across the country.”

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) program is a national program of RWJF and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN). The program is designed to help alleviate the national nursing shortage, increase the diversity of nursing professionals, expand capacity in baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs and enhance the pipeline of potential nurse faculty.

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Art at Waynesburg University - A Christian College in Pa

Big school, or small school? That's the question a lot of individuals face when choosing a college. And in the laundry list of factors that goes into choosing a college, size and type are often at the top in terms of importance. Here are the top five reasons to consider a small, liberal arts college or university…

 

5. Community. It's a rarity to walk anywhere on a smaller campus and not see someone you know. Sheer numbers are a big part of that, but so is the fact that everyone on campus seems to be involved in something. If you play a sport, write for the school newspaper, sing in the choir and work in the dining hall, you might be a student at one of these schools. Seems like a busy life, but the camaraderie is hard to beat at larger institutions.

 

4. Scholarships and financial aid. Sure, big, public universities may have a cheaper sticker price, but when it comes to the bottom line, small schools often surprise prospective students with their affordability. The combination of scholarships and need-based institutional aid, which typically isn't available at larger colleges, makes this possible.

 

3. Small classes taught by professors. Because graduate and doctoral programs are not as prevalent at smaller liberal arts schools, often times, graduate students and teaching assistants don't exist, and if they do, they're not in front of the classroom. Full-time faculty members are the ones teaching the undergraduate students, and it's almost always in a smaller setting. No 300-seat auditoriums here; you'll know your classmates and be able to interact with them in a more intimate classroom environment.

 

2. Grad schools and employers value it. As Lynn O'Shaughnessy put it in her 2010 article on cbsnews.com, “liberal arts colleges…teach kids how to think, talk and write,” and, while simple, that's exactly what employers are looking for. Furthermore, according to O'Shaughnessy's article, “liberal arts schools dominate the list of the top 10 institutions that produce the most students who ultimately earn doctorates.” Why is this? Graduate schools are looking for just the type of research opportunities students have at liberal arts colleges.

 

1. You know your professors, and they know you. While learning from professors in small classes is great, an even bigger benefit is actually getting to know your professors on a personal level and gaining hands-on experience right alongside them. The connections you make with those individuals become invaluable as you search for graduate schools and/or employment. They've all been out there in the field doing the work themselves, and now they're helping little ole you do the same.

 

Dave Floyd is an Admissions Counselor at Waynesburg University, whose travel territory includes Westmoreland County, Eastern Pennsylvania and the Northeast states. He is also a 2012 Waynesburg alumnus.


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So what's it like at a small, private, Christian College in PA around finals? Well, these two videos tell the story. It's all about community and coming together to strengthen, encourage and at times entertain each other.

 

President and Mrs. Thyreen hold the annual President's Late Night Breakfast on the first night of finals. It's a chance for students to come together, get a great meal cooked and served by the university administrators and prepare for the week ahead.

 

 

The Student Activities Board prepares for finals week by making care packages for students. These care packages are paid for by parents of students and are delivered just in time for finals.

 

 

If you'd like to be a part of a small, engaged, Christian university in Pennsylvania, click here to find out more about Waynesburg University.

 

 

 

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Waynesburg University By the Numbers

To get more information about Waynesburg Unversity download our Campus Profile Packet.

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Miller Hall Waynesburg Unviersity

If you're thinking about applying to Waynesburg University, now is the time. Applying before November first will give you the best chance to get one of our Competitive Merit Scholarships:

 

 

  • "Dr. Charles Bryner Scholarship": $2,000 to $5,000 per year 
(Students in health related fields)

 

  • "Governor's School Merit Scholarship": $2,000 per year

 

  • "Hugh O'Brian Scholarship": $2,000 per year 
(Hugh O'Brian Ambassador)

 

  • "Margaret Bell Mill Scholarship": $2,000 per year
. This scholarship is awarded to high academic students who have board scores above 1250 (SAT) or 28 (ACT) and have shown academic excellence.

 

  • "Pennsylvania Governor's Conference Woman's Scholarship": $2,500 per year
. This scholarship is awarded to one female Pennsylvania resident student who has demonstrated financial need.

 

  • "State Scholars Scholarship": $2,000 and is renewable for four consecutive years (Students whose permanent residence is outside of Pennsylvania and have a 3.0 or higher).

 

  • "The Leadership Program": $2,000 per year 
(approximately 10-15 awards)

 

  • "The Bonner Scholarship": $2,500-$4,000 (15-17 awards based upon Community Service)

 

  • "The Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership Scholarship": $5,000 per year (5 awards based on students' interest in the study of the Constitution of the United States and moral leadership)

 

  • "Waynesburg University Alumni Scholarship": $1,500 - $3,000 per year.
One student is selected each year by the Waynesburg University Alumni Council that has been active in both school and community service activities.

 

Bonus Scholarship

 

If you're from Ohio you can qualify for "The Ohio Honors Scholarship": Full Tuition, Room, and Board
 (1 Math or Science Students)

 








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