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b2ap3_thumbnail_Matriculation-2015.jpgWaynesburg University’s 2015-2016 academic school year officially began Thursday, August 20, with the University’s annual Matriculation Ceremony. President Douglas G. Lee and other University leaders welcomed the freshman class at the 2 p.m. ceremony in Roberts Chapel.

“We are an institution committed to educating students to make connections between faith, learning and serving so that they might faithfully transform their communities and the world,” said President Lee. “Essential to this task is perseverance. In the words of former Waynesburg president A.B. Miller, ‘The great work of turning a life to good account cannot be accomplished by dreaming, by hoping, not even by solemn resolution but by earnest, laborious, persevering effort.’” 

During the ceremony, the names of matriculating students were announced by Lanny Frattare, assistant professor of communication, and Doug Wilson, lecturer of communication.

Matriculation marks the beginning of an eventful weekend organized to introduce freshmen to their new home at Waynesburg University. The incoming class will meet with faculty, participate in activities that allow them to meet other new students and attend numerous informational meetings.

The University welcomed over 400 students representing 57 different majors and 21 states, including Alaska, California, South Carolina, Vermont and Wyoming.

More than $4 million in institutional sponsored scholarships and grants have been awarded to the incoming class, including five Stover Scholarships, 17 Bonner Scholarships and seven Scout Scholarships.

The incoming class had the opportunity to participate in more than 20 events that the Waynesburg University Admissions Office hosted throughout the year in addition to personal visit opportunities. 

Jessica Sumpter, director of admissions at Waynesburg University, said that the Admissions Office staff and campus community is excited to welcome the many students with whom they aided in the college search and selection process.

“We are excited for the students to finally be able to experience all that Waynesburg University has to offer,” said Sumpter. “We could not be more thrilled that the incoming students have chosen to come to Waynesburg University!"

Freshmen moved into their residence halls Thursday, August 20. Upperclassmen will move into residence halls Sunday, August 23, and classes will begin Monday, August 24.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_8-19-Anderson.jpgWaynesburg University will host Philip Anderson as the Glenn A. and Jane L. Crosby Lecture Series speaker Wednesday, Sept. 2, at 7 p.m. The lecture will be held in Alumni Hall on the campus of Waynesburg University. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend. 

Anderson is a program director within the Department of Computer Science and Digital Technologies at Northumbria University in the United Kingdom, where he is responsible for strategic direction and effective management of a number of programs within the department. 

Anderson’s lecture, “The Challenges of Developing and Teaching a Digital Forensics Curriculum,” will outline a number of learning and teaching methods and approaches that can be used to effectively teach a digital forensics degree curriculum. 

His address will highlight the challenges and potential solutions identified thus far by Northumbria University in their Computer and Digital Forensics degree course delivery. Anderson will also discuss industry and student views while examining potential career pathways for graduates. 

Anderson has more than 14 years of extensive teaching experience in higher education with more than nine years of subject expertise in developing and teaching digital and computer forensic modules. His main research interests are innovative learning and teaching and student assessments.

The Glenn A. and Jane L. Crosby Lectures, funded by 1950 Magna Cum Laude graduates of Waynesburg University Glenn A. and Jane Lichtenfels Crosby, bring to the University visiting scholars who are distinguished in their disciplines. During the visit, the scholars interact with faculty, staff and students, giving guest lectures in classes, formal presentations and informal group talks. The event culminates in a final public lecture.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Waynesburg University’s third annual Merit Badge University, planned for Saturday, Oct. 31, 2015, will provide Boy Scouts with the opportunity to earn merit badges while being exposed to a wide spectrum of academic disciplines by qualified faculty and staff at Waynesburg University.

The one-day event will take place on the campus of Waynesburg University from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and will offer 31 merit badges, including Aviation, Cycling, Engineering, Environmental Science, Indian Lore and Scouting Heritage. For a complete list of merit badges or to register, visit http://www.waynesburg.edu/merit-badge-university. 

Cost for the day is $10 and includes lunch, a Class B shirt, a patch and instruction by Waynesburg University faculty. Space will not be held for Scouts until payment is made. All spaces are first come, first served. Walk-in registrants will be accepted as space allows, but shirts and patches are not guaranteed. Registration is limited to 300 scouts.

Adult participants who plan to attend merit badge sessions must be in Class A/Field Uniform and must present evidence of their BSA registration and current Youth Protection Training. Alternate activities will be provided for adult participants who do not wish to accompany scouts to badge sessions or who are not appropriately registered with the BSA.  

The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) is one of the nation's largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizations. The BSA provides a program for young people that builds character, trains them in the responsibilities of participating citizenship and develops personal fitness.

For more information, visit the website above or contact 724-852-7660.

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Posted by on in Alumni

Guided and influenced by more than seven years of experiences on the campus of Waynesburg University, Alison Chasko has achieved her goal of being a part of something bigger and more meaningful than a successful business.

Chasko currently serves as a Mission Support Analyst for the FBI, reporting directly to the Special Agent in Charge of the Denver Division (the territory covering all of Colorado and Wyoming). Responsible for improving the overall function of the organization, Chasko works to identify, analyze and resolve issues related to the operations of the FBI field offices. Her research and study of inefficiencies ultimately lead to recommendations that result in solutions and measurable improvements within the organization as a whole.

“It’s not about making money for a company, but having a greater purpose,” she said. “The people and the mission of the FBI motivate me to be a better employee. By seeing them risk their lives and devote so much time to doing what they do, I want to be better so I can alleviate administrative burdens to agents and so that I can demonstrate their needs through quantitative evidence and reports back to headquarters.”

For Chasko, teaching science was a possibility, working for a federal agency was a goal, but the opportunity to work specifically for the FBI became her dream.

Living her dream, Chasko, a 2007 forensic science alumna and a 2009 graduate of the University’s Master of Education Program, is grateful to be a part of the reputation and mission of the FBI.

Chasko’s position is one of only six in the Bureau, and is part of a pilot program initiated this spring. Eventually, one mission support analyst will be found in each of the 56 field offices across the nation.
Ironically, her daily responsibilities perfectly mirror some of the most meaningful lessons learned throughout her undergraduate and graduate education at Waynesburg University.

“Both educational experiences provided me with professors and mentors who had high expectations of me. They provided enough guidance, but pushed for me to think critically and analyze a topic, which in the long run, built up my confidence [in my abilities],” she said.

In addition to the confidence and knowledge gained at Waynesburg University, Chasko credits her mentors and criminal justice faculty members for preparing her for the transition to the professional world.

“The Criminal Justice Department’s faculty consisted of some of the best mentors a young adult could ask for,” she said. “Dr. Baer, Detective Jack and Mr. McIlwain truly knew how to inspire and help develop strong work ethic with attention to detail. Each of them had their own teaching style with high standards, but as a student you knew that they cared about your learning. They took the time to make sure you understood the material, helped guide you through your career goals, and really prepared you to transition from college to the workforce.”

Even more important than life lessons including time management, articulating ideas to various audiences and recognizing that everyone doesn’t learn or understand information in the same manner; Chasko said her college experiences such as participating in mission trips and being empowered to be the change in the world by teachers and mentors, truly shaped her as a person.

“As much as college is meant for earning the degree, I think the person I have become is very much related to the experiences I received at Waynesburg University. I could have attended numerous universities and received the same degree, but I would not have received the experiences or mentors that Waynesburg offered.”

Writers Note - Faculty members mentioned above are as follows:

Dr. Dana Baer, professor of criminal justice
Adam Jack, assistant professor of criminal justice and chair, criminal justice and social science
John  McIlwain, retired professor of criminal justice 

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As a senior at Waynesburg University, family and friends often ask me if I like attending Waynesburg. My answer is typically a resounding yes. Not only have I enjoyed my time at Waynesburg, I would also recommend Waynesburg to high school students beginning their college search. Here are 5 reasons why. 

  1. You will build meaningful relationships with your professors and just about anyone else on campus. This is the number one reason I love Waynesburg. My professors don’t just know my name; they know my strengths and interests. They truly care about my success and demonstrate their concern by investing time in me. My professors have assisted me with resume building, academic planning and career counseling; however, professors aren’t the only faculty members that offer students support. I’m often given hugs from cafeteria workers, comedic relief from security guards and smiles from administrative staff. Waynesburg is a relationship-centered institution, and that is proven each day from the actions of faculty and staff. 
  2. You can’t skip class. Of course you are allotted three unexcused absences before your grade is affected, but class attendance is arguably more than highly encouraged, it is mandatory. While some people may think I am crazy for viewing this as a pro, I view attendance checks as a positive aspect of attending a small school. Because my absence is recognizable, I am encouraged to take full advantage of my education by attending each class.
  3. Class engagement is encouraged. At Waynesburg, you will never sit in a large auditorium being lectured for an hour. You will have small classes in which you will be encouraged to participate. My classmates and I often ‘interrupt’ class to ask a question or share our opinion on the topic we are discussing; however, our interjections are never frowned upon, they are welcomed. I enjoy participating in a learning environment in which my input is valuable and my questions and concerns are always met with suggestions and solutions. 
  4. Everything is within walking distance. This may be true of other small colleges, but I believe it is especially true of Waynesburg. My commute to class from my dorm is never longer than five minutes. The same goes for my trips to my club meetings, work-study job, the gym, library or cafeteria. This means that even if I am running late (which is often), it is easy to get to where I need to be on time, and if I forget something in my dorm, it is never a pain to simply return to my dorm between classes to retrieve the forgotten item. I love the gorgeous campus landscape that allows for easy walkability, despite all the hills! 
  5. You will be positioned to succeed in your courses. With extremely accessible professors, free tutoring and writing services, you will have multiple resources to help you succeed in your courses. While transitioning from high school to college is difficult, attending a school like Waynesburg eased my transition. My class size in high school was similar to that of my class size at Waynesburg, eliminating the overwhelming aspect of adapting to a new learning environment. In fact, in my time at Waynesburg, I have improved my GPA since high school, which is something not many people can say. This is due in part to the individualized attention that I receive from my professors. If I am ever struggling, I know I can turn to my professors to offer guidance and support. 
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