Nine Waynesburg University students will serve The Pittsburgh Project (TPP) for a weekend work camp Friday, April 11, through Sunday, April 13. Dave Calvario, dean of students and director of the Center for Service Leadership, will serve as trip leader.

“The Pittsburgh Project serves vulnerable homeowners in neighborhoods throughout the city by providing home repairs,” Calvario said. “It is a Christian Community Development organization.”

Located on the north side of Pittsburgh, TPP is committed to meeting the needs of the Pittsburgh community and providing inner-city housing ministries. For several years, Waynesburg University has partnered with TPP to give homeowners a chance to save their homes as well as prevent possible citation or eviction.

Students participating will assist with general home repairs and focus on building relationships with homeowners.

Students participating in The Pittsburgh Project weekend trip include:

  • Kimberly Baston, a freshman journalism major from North Huntingdon, Pa.
  • Craig Collins, a freshman biology major from Carmichaels, Pa.
  • James Glisan, a sophomore biblical ministry major from West Newton, Pa.
  • Nathan Hsueh, a junior computer security and forensics major from Mercer Island, Wash.
  • Paige Lane, a freshman athletic training major from West Lafayette, Ohio
  • Taryn Leiter, a freshman arts administration major from Erie, Pa.
  • Ben Little, a sophomore sociology major from McKeesport, Pa.
  • Hannah Szymanik, a senior special education major from Mount Holly Springs, Pa.
  • James Witte, a junior political science major from Waynesburg, Pa.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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First semester freshman year, I anxiously sat waiting for my second class of the day to begin. My Survey of Music course had just let out and as I trekked across campus, gasping for air as I climbed the hill to Buhl Hall, I wondered what else was in store for me.

High school was over. College was a new animal.

I took a seat in the front near the door, not wanting to draw attention to myself, but still wanting to get as much as I could from the lecture. As students filed through the door, I pulled out my fresh notebook, a mechanical pencil and my agenda, making sure everything was labeled properly (some things wouldn’t change) and that I had what I needed.

When I finally looked up, a man shuffled into the room whistling as he closed the door behind him. He set his things on the desk in the front of the room and then turned around to write his name on the board.

“My name is Dr. Bob Randolph,” he said over his shoulder as he wrote. “But you can call me Dr. Bob.”

When I enrolled at Waynesburg, I wasn’t sure exactly what I wanted to do with my life, so I declared my major as “exploring.” During freshman orientation, I met with my given advisor. As we sat across from each other she showed me my schedule for the semester, which had been put together based on my interests and general requirements. Her red pen pointed at each line, creating a small dot at the beginning of each course name.

·Survey of Music

·College Composition I

·Environmental Biology

·Fiat Lux

When her pen settled on a line that read “Introduction to Creative Writing” a sudden surge of excitement took over. I was going to write.

Dr. Bob turned around and gave a reassuring smile to the room full of unsure freshman students, settling on my own nervous face for a moment before continuing. He told us what the class was about and the more he talked, the more drawn in I became. We were going to write fiction, poetry and a small memoir. I could not wait to get started. The first thing we would write would be a flash fiction story—500 words, due the following week.

I became intent on creating a suspense filled award winner. The idea for the story came quickly and I feverishly typed out the plot line. My story was about a young woman whose husband had gone to war and died, or so she thought. She mourned over their pictures together, remembering the day she watched him climb onto the plane. One stormy night she wandered out to their old creaky barn and found a letter from him. He was alive. They weren’t safe. He would send for her.

As funny as it all sounds to me now as I look back on that semester (and that ridiculous story), my freshman self was intrigued—emotionally invested. Full of new ideas and concepts for stories, I had found a passion. By the middle of that semester I was in my advisor’s office proudly declaring my major as English, creative writing.

What I have learned as a creative writing major at Waynesburg is far more than how to write a compelling story. I have learned how to incorporate new ideas into otherwise tedious writing, I have learned how to show emotion in a way that relates to those I am trying to appeal, and I have learned how to write grammatically correct, effective pieces of work.

Story-telling, I have found, is an art form. Through it, we become inspired, we feel and we dream. Creative writing is more than writing poetry, fiction and nonfiction. It is observing and understanding the world and those in it; it’s sharing experiences with people from various demographics; and it’s coming up with new ways to explain the things that affect us all as human beings.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Kayla_Painting.jpgHow art courses at Waynesburg have changed my life (as a non-major).

1. The first time I picked up a paintbrush was my sophomore year at Waynesburg. It was the fall term and as I scoured the thin book of offered courses, I stumbled upon an acrylics class, open to all majors. Aside from some sketching here and there, I had never put much effort in to becoming an artist; all I wanted to draw were horses. I had spent my childhood drawing horses until I nearly mastered them. They ran, jumped and reared on the page, never accompanied by a scene of any sort, just a ghost on a sheet of printer paper. Simply put, I couldn’t draw anything else. It was difficult for me to envision myself painting, but I had heard the professor graded based on progress not talent (friendly to anyone with a true interest in learning) so I joined. In a few short weeks, I found myself consumed in the technique of putting paint to canvas— the smooth, gentle glide of a brush and the act of finishing my own work-of-art. It was after my first painting that I (reluctantly) called myself an artist.

2. That fall semester my sophomore year proved to be a challenge, yet, when my feet found their way to the art room time stopped. I sat at the long table with my easel, pushing my brush against the canvas sheet, and I felt my mind lift from the haze of upcoming exams and papers. I couldn’t get enough of the freedom I felt when I was covered in paint, leaving fingerprints on the things I touched. When I realized just how therapeutic painting had become for me, I decided to order more supplies and bring the studio to my own kitchen. The sink, table and floor quickly became their own masterpieces, dripping with paint to my mother’s disliking, while I worked on my paintings. I allowed my thoughts to drift off to happier places where the world I envisioned was the world I became a part of, not the one I actually lived in.

3. Art, I have found, is not always realistic or the popular definition of beauty, yet as I stand in front of a sculpture or a painting with its odd limbs and colors, suspended in midair, I find myself lost in it amidst a lack of understanding. I wander toward it, staring, hoping I’ll have that “ah ha” moment where it becomes clear what exactly is in front of me. I never do, but the interest remains. I continue to look, hopelessly. Questions fill my mind, pressing me to think outside of my normal worldviews. Picasso, Warhol, Kandinsky, what dreamlike places did you travel while you transposed your thoughts to paper and paint to canvas? I want to know where you’ve been.

4. There are nights when I look at the blue and orange sky shifting to pinks and purples over tree branched mountain tops and I want to scoop them up and spread them over a fresh, white canvas, letting the colors mold into one another as they kiss the corners of the page. I want to mark that image forever in my mind, hang it on the wall or mount it in a gallery for the world to see the things I have seen in that very moment. Sometimes I grab my camera to keep that image tucked away, somewhere, for a second glance, but what I have found, through my art courses, is nothing can quite capture an image the same as an artist’s eye.

5. When I think about the peculiarity in the nature of a piece of art, I think of God and His own designs. What inspires God to mold, cut, mix and scrape his creations into their final forms? With infinite amounts of color, materials and tools, the possibilities are endless, yet he chose to create me. What greater, peculiar, humbling love could a person ever encounter?

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Monogram Small.jpgWaynesburg University will host a Senior Art Exhibition for Nathanael Long Monday, March 24, through Wednesday, April 16. An opening reception will take place Monday, March 31, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Benedum Fine Arts Gallery. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend.

Senior art exhibitions take place each semester to provide veteran art students with a platform to showcase the products of a practiced creative process. Students spend four years creating and preserving pieces they are most proud of for this very occasion. 

Long’s exhibit includes paintings, photography, sculptures and ceramics pieces he has worked on throughout his academic career, concentrating on abstract art for the purposes of the show.

“Art is something I have enjoyed ever since I can remember,” Long said. “I realize now that I will always be a student of art because there is always more to learn. I like the challenge of trying to make interesting compositions using line, form and color to express myself.”

The Art Program at Waynesburg University allows students to mold, paint and sketch works of their imagination while providing the tools to grasp a comprehensive knowledge of techniques and history. Students hone abilities through class discussion, demonstrations and exhibits. 

Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, or by appointment. For more information call 724-852-3247.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Posted by on in Alumni

Biology (Pre-med)

Family Medicine Resident practicing at Cornerstone Care & Mon General Hospital

Mt. Morris, Pa., & Morgantown, W.Va.| Osteopathy

Additional Info:

  • Psi Sigma Alpha/ Member of American Medical Women's Association
  • Doctorate in Osteopathy, West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine, 2013
  • Bachelor of Science, Waynesburg University, 2009

“Four years at Waynesburg University prepared me in more ways than I thought for the career path I have chosen.  As a physician, my faith, which was strengthened and shaped as a college student, has played into my career. Without a grounded faith in Christ, I would not be where I am today and I certainly would not be showing Christ's love to the patients I see each day.”

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