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Waynesburg University will host a fall overnight visitation for high school seniors Sunday, Nov. 9, through Monday, Nov. 10. Registration will be held in the Stover Campus Center beginning at 5 p.m.

“The Overnight Visitation gives prospective students the opportunity to ‘test drive’ to see what it would be like to be a student here at Waynesburg University,” said Jessica Sumpter, director of admissions at Waynesburg University.

When students arrive on campus, they will be paired with current Waynesburg University students who will serve as their overnight hosts. Through their hosts, participants will be given an inside look at the residence halls, academic programs, student life and campus facilities.

“By staying in the residence halls and being hosted by current Waynesburg University students, high school seniors are able to experience an aspect of student life that they would not be able to experience on any other visitation day,” said Sumpter.

Participants will have the opportunity to observe classes related to their potential areas of study and meet with students and faculty members in their intended majors. A variety of activities will be offered to students including icebreakers, a pizza party, informational student discussion groups and student-assisted worship, among others.

For more information or to register, contact the Office of Admissions at 800-225-7393.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Monogram Small.jpgThe Waynesburg University Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science and the Office of Admissions will host the fall Mock Crime Scene Workshop Saturday, Nov. 8, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

The Mock Crime Scene Workshop provides high school students the opportunity to analyze crime scenes and collect and process evidence alongside Waynesburg University students and faculty, as well as experts in the field. 

Students will gain hands-on training from skilled experts in the forensic sciences and have the opportunity to utilize those practices by applying them at a crime scene. The vast array of workshops offered will help students to determine if they can see a forensic science or criminal justice career in their futures. 

“The Mock Crime Scene weekend gives the current students, faculty and staff the opportunity to meet prospective students and show them, through experience, what they can expect by attending Waynesburg University,” said Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science. “Our goal is to excite them about our programs, the opportunities available to them and assist them with making lasting connections with our community.” 

Every year, typically more than 40 current high school sophomores, juniors and seniors attend the event. 

To register, or for more information, contact the Office of Admissions at 800-225-7393. 

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Jerome-Creach_b-f-maiz-speaker.JPGWaynesburg University’s b.f. maiz Lecture will feature Dr. Jerome F.D. Creach Monday, Sept. 22, at 7 p.m. in Alumni Hall. The topic of the lecture is “Asking God for Vengeance: The Role of Imprecation in Christian Prayer.” Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend. 

Creach is the Robert C. Holland Professor of Old Testament at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and is the author of five books, including “Violence in Scripture,” “The Destiny of the Righteous in the Psalms” and “Joshua in the Interpretation Commentary Series.”

The lecturer holds a doctorate from Union Presbyterian Seminary. His interests include the appropriation of the Bible in the life of the church and the community, with specific emphasis on the Psalms and the Prophets.  

The b. f. maiz Center, named after the late poet b. f. maiz, exists to continue and to amplify his lifelong concerns with poetry, peace and poetic justice. This speaker is invited to campus as part of the b.f. maiz Center’s activities.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Sherman-Colorito-for-small-liberal-arts-top-5.pngBig school, or small school? That’s the question a lot of individuals face when choosing a college. And in the long list of factors that goes into choosing a college, size and type often find themselves placed near the top in terms of importance. To help with this critical question in the college search process, here are the top five reasons to consider a small, liberal arts college or university…

5. Community.  It’s rare to walk anywhere on a smaller campus and not see someone you know. Sheer numbers play a major role in that, but so does the fact that everyone on campus seems to be involved in something. If you play a sport, host a show on the school radio station, perform in the musical and work in the bookstore, you might be a student at one of these schools. Seems like a busy life, but the camaraderie is hard to beat at larger institutions.
4. Scholarships and financial aid.  Sure, big, public universities may have a cheaper sticker price, but when it comes to the bottom line, small schools often surprise prospective students with their affordability. The combination of scholarships and need-based institutional aid, which typically isn’t available at larger colleges, makes this possible.
3. Small classes taught by professors.  Because graduate and doctoral programs are not as prevalent at smaller liberal arts schools, often times, graduate students and teaching assistants don’t exist, and if they do, they’re not in front of the classroom. Faculty members are the ones teaching the undergraduate students, and it’s almost always in a smaller setting. No 300-seat auditoriums here; you’ll know your classmates and be able to interact with them in a more intimate classroom environment.
2. Grad schools and employers value it.  As Lynn O’Shaughnessy put it in her 2010 article on cbsnews.com, “liberal arts colleges…teach kids how to think, talk and write,” and, while simple, that’s exactly what employers are looking for. Furthermore, according to O’Shaughnessy’s article, “liberal arts schools dominate the list of the top 10 institutions that produce the most students who ultimately earn doctorates.” Why is this? Graduate schools are looking for just the type of research opportunities students have at liberal arts colleges.
1. You know your professors, and they know you.  While learning from professors in small classes is great, an even bigger benefit is getting to know your professors on a personal level and gaining hands-on experience right alongside them. The connections you make with those individuals become invaluable as you search for graduate schools and/or employment. They’ve all been out there in the field doing the work themselves, and now they’re helping little ole you do the same.

 

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Waynesburg University’s Teaching with Primary Sources Program (TPS) will hold Fall Institute TPS and Pennsylvania Common Core, a free Level I workshop. Fall Institute will be offered Saturday, Sept. 27, and Saturday, Oct. 4, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Waynesburg’s Southpointe Center. 

All educators are invited to attend and will have the opportunity to earn up to 15 PDE Act 48 Activity Hours.

Fall Institute aims to expand educators’ understanding of the Library of Congress and help them discover effective strategies for teaching with primary sources. 

Participants can expect to learn how to select and use primary sources, integrate classroom activities with Common Core Standards and foster project development, group discussion and peer collaboration. 

Space is limited. To register visit: https://forms.waynesburg.edu/machform/view.php?id=365230

For more information, contact Sue Wise at swise@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3377.

Funded by a grant from the Library of Congress, TPS at Waynesburg University provides professional development for in-service and pre-service teachers. TPS at Waynesburg University works with schools, universities, libraries and foundations to help teachers throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania use the Library's digitized primary sources to enrich their classroom instruction.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Tagged in: TPS TPS news
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