Super User

Super User has not set their biography yet

Posted by on in Internships

This summer, Rob McKinney, junior sports broadcasting and sports information major, learned exactly what it meant to work in the news business.

The news industry has a history of early mornings that start well before 9 a.m. This is the time during which McKinney thrives in action. He began interning with WJPA Radio Station in Washington, Pennsylvania, in May 2016.

McKinney’s title as news reporter led him to covering a variety of events. He covered Washington County council meetings and different trials. He also worked Saturday morning news.

“I went into the station at 3:30 a.m. and read the day’s updated news every top of the hour,” said McKinney. “My favorite experience thus far was my first Saturday morning by myself.”

McKinney noted that he may have made his share of mistakes, but learned quickly what to and not to do in just eight short hours. He also had the opportunity to interview Governor Tom Wolf and State Representative Pam Snyder while working on different news stories. Through all of his early mornings, McKinney persisted because he said that he loves what he does and that it is worth it when you have a passion for the field of broadcast.

When he reflects on how his experience at Waynesburg helped him prepare for his summer internship, he noted that Lanny Frattare has helped him become the professional he is today.

“I applied to this internship because my advisor, Lanny Frattare, gave me the opportunity, and I knew it would give me tremendous professional experience,” said McKinney. “All of my radio and announcing classes with Lanny helped prepare my voice and my pacing to be an effective broadcaster.”

McKinney’s internship was not exactly what he had expected because he did not think he would be able to be as involved as he was. When thinking about his future endeavors, McKinney speaks highly of his internship with WJPA.

“My internship helped me by showing me how professional radio works,” said McKinney. “I hope to be on television one day reporting the news, and working with news currently can only help.”

Hits: 148

Waynesburg University’s chapter of the Sigma Beta Delta International Honor Society was recently selected as an outstanding chapter for the 2015-2016 academic year. Out of 250 chapters, the selection committee chooses just three chapters each year for this distinction.

The Sigma Beta Delta Honor Society is made up of business, management and administration students. To be selected as an exceptional chapter, the society had to meet certain criteria, including induction rate, exceptional administration involvement and an extensive fellowship application submitted in the spring.

The Waynesburg University chapter was commended for their exemplary performance in chapter operations and administration.

“For us to receive an award that is based on exemplary performance in chapter operations and management shows the students that we, as faculty members, hold ourselves to the same high standards of achievement as we hold them,” said Neeley Shaw, chapter advisor for Sigma Beta Delta Honor Society and instructor of business administration. “The award is a testament to the hard work and dedication we have to our students in the business department.”

Anthony Bocchini, president of Waynesburg University’s chapter of the Sigma Beta Delta Honor Society and professor of business administration, and Shaw, began working on expanding their membership in the spring of last year.

Bocchini and Shaw are committed to growing the chapter and continually holding their students to a level of excellence they know they can achieve.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

# # #

Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 447

Posted by on in Alumni

b2ap3_thumbnail_JD-Lydic-2.JPGRecent sports broadcasting and sports information graduate, J.D. Lydic, has uprooted to Erie, Pennsylvania, to start his career in the news industry.

Lydic is currently a multimedia journalist for WICU and WSEE of Erie News Now, an NBC affiliated television station. He is responsible for coming in to work each day with multiple stories, and his news director chooses which stories are classified as newsworthy.

In a single day, Lydic goes out into the community to record video and conduct interviews. He then returns to the studio to edit his footage into a short news package that is accompanied by a script he prepares after the video editing is complete. Complete packages are then posted onto the station’s website with a written story.

When Lydic thinks back to his time at Waynesburg, he recounts how he was prepared for the workforce.

“Waynesburg allowed me to get on-air experience in television,” he said. “I was taught how to be part of the community and what makes a good news story.”

Lydic attributes professors Lanny Frattare, Melinda Roeder, Brandon Szuminsky and Bill Molzon for helping him become a great broadcaster with a wide skill set that made him more marketable when searching for his first job out of college.

Thus far, Lydic has learned that it is a busy world in news and the deadlines come quickly, as he is responsible for all aspects of creating a story.

“I have learned that it takes a lot of work and the starting things young reporters are asked to do can be many,” he said. “You must work through it all to become successful.”

Lydic also noted that Waynesburg’s mission taught him how to be a servant in the community by using his talents as a voice for the public.

Hits: 168

Posted by on in News

The Waynesburg University Symphonic Band fall concert, “Movie Magic,” will be held Wednesday, Oct. 12, at 5:15 p.m. in the Marsh Center in Roberts Chapel.

This presentation will begin the Symphonic Band’s yearlong exploration of the vast world of movie themes. A variety of musical styles encompassing silent films, dramas, historical pieces, animated films and blockbuster soundtracks will be celebrated.

Musical themes will be presented that bring attendees back to many of their favorite movie memories. Themes from great composers, such as Leonard Bernstein, Bruce Broughton, Randy Edelman, James Horner, James Newton Howard, Alan Silvestri, Howard Shore, John Williams, Hans Zimmer and others will be brought to life.

Concertgoers will be inspired by the melodies that set the stage for many facets of the human experience.

No reservations are necessary for the event.

For more information, contact Ronda DePriest at rdepries@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3420.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

# # #

Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 196

Posted by on in Blog

In April 2015, Mackenna Drazich, a sophomore public relations major, attended a health fair at Waynesburg University, not knowing that it would forever change both her life and someone else’s.

At the fair, which was held in conjunction with the football team’s annual “Be the Match” event, Drazich signed up for the National Bone Marrow Registry. The hope is to find a match for patients that are in need of a bone marrow transplant.

Several months after joining the registry, Drazich received a phone call saying she was a potential match. After receiving the news, Drazich went through further testing, and was soon notified that she was indeed a match.

“I had mixed feelings about having some pain and having surgery for the first time in my life, but it was still the easiest decision of my life,” Drazich said. “I was going to save this person’s life.”

Drazich went through a number of tests to ensure that she was the best match for the recipient. The bone marrow was extracted from the hipbones through the lower back.

“The surgery went great,” said Drazich. “I walked around very slowly for the next couple of days and got tired easily.”

In a month’s time, Drazich’s bone marrow will regenerate, and she said she felt about 75 percent of her normal self at ten-days post surgery.

“I am forever changed and humbled to be chosen to do such a thing,” added Drazich. “I give credit to my mom for instilling me with a love to do God’s work in serving others.”

The recipient is a woman with Leukemia, and after she receives the bone marrow, she and Drazich will essentially have identical immune systems. The recipient will undergo intense chemotherapy, in hopes that her body will accept Drazich’s bone marrow.

This was the second annual Be the Match drive hosted by Waynesburg University football team. Be the Match On Campus is a national program that encourages college- age students to have recruitment drives for the National Marrow Donor Program. The event educates students on Be the Match’s mission to help patients get the transplant they need to save their life.

The football team’s event successfully registered 163 students.

Visit bethematch.org for more information or to sign up for the National Marrow Donor Program.

Hits: 83