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The Waynesburg University Bonner Scholars will host Empty Bowls Greene County Sunday, April 6, from noon to 3 p.m., at the Greene County Fairgrounds Building 9. Lunch will begin at 12:30 p.m. Cost is $20 and includes a meal, handcrafted bowl and a donation to the Weekend Food Program. Ages 12 and under eat for free, but will not receive a handmade bowl.

Empty Bowls Greene County is a luncheon and fundraiser designed to help fight hunger. Attendants will enjoy soups provided by Dan Wagner, culinary arts instructor at the Greene County Career and Technology Center, and breads provided by Rising Creek Bakery. They will also have the opportunity to select from a variety of hand-crafted ceramic bowls, made by Waynesburg University students and the local Artbeat.

Hand-crafted items by local artisans will be up for bid during a silent auction. Proceeds will benefit the Greene County Weekend Food Program. Tickets can be purchased at Artbeat and the Community Foundation of Greene County on High Street.

The event will host guest speaker Donna Dire, a Social Worker from Graysville Elementary School. Dire will share the ways in which she has seen the Weekend Food Program have a direct impact on young children and real life stories from parents and children.

Organizations such as Produce to People, Greater Pittsburgh Food Bank, AmeriCorps VISTA and Urban League – SNAP will be in attendance to educate the local community about hunger.

For questions or additional information, please contact Steven Snow at: sno3316@student.waynesburg.edu.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Nine Waynesburg University students will serve The Pittsburgh Project (TPP) for a weekend work camp Friday, April 11, through Sunday, April 13. Dave Calvario, dean of students and director of the Center for Service Leadership, will serve as trip leader.

“The Pittsburgh Project serves vulnerable homeowners in neighborhoods throughout the city by providing home repairs,” Calvario said. “It is a Christian Community Development organization.”

Located on the north side of Pittsburgh, TPP is committed to meeting the needs of the Pittsburgh community and providing inner-city housing ministries. For several years, Waynesburg University has partnered with TPP to give homeowners a chance to save their homes as well as prevent possible citation or eviction.

Students participating will assist with general home repairs and focus on building relationships with homeowners.

Students participating in The Pittsburgh Project weekend trip include:

  • Kimberly Baston, a freshman journalism major from North Huntingdon, Pa.
  • Craig Collins, a freshman biology major from Carmichaels, Pa.
  • James Glisan, a sophomore biblical ministry major from West Newton, Pa.
  • Nathan Hsueh, a junior computer security and forensics major from Mercer Island, Wash.
  • Paige Lane, a freshman athletic training major from West Lafayette, Ohio
  • Taryn Leiter, a freshman arts administration major from Erie, Pa.
  • Ben Little, a sophomore sociology major from McKeesport, Pa.
  • Hannah Szymanik, a senior special education major from Mount Holly Springs, Pa.
  • James Witte, a junior political science major from Waynesburg, Pa.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_LittleWomen.jpgDirected by Edward L. Powers, director of the theater program and professor of theater at Waynesburg University, the Waynesburg University Players will present “Little Women” Wednesday, April 2, through Saturday, April 5, in the Goodwin Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. each evening. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend. 

“Little Women,” inspired by the popular American novel, will follow Jo March and her sisters as they journey into adulthood following the years of the Civil War. With lyrics by Mindi Dickstein and music by Jason Howland, this recent Broadway hit offers many delightful songs that any audience member is sure to enjoy. 

“One broad based theme would be that it is important to know who you really are,” said Powers. “Jo tries to be someone she is not, but she only finds real happiness when she recognizes who she truly is. As Shakespeare said, ‘To thine ownself be true.’”

The cast and crew include:

Jo March: Erika Stafford, a senior psychology major from Orrville, Ohio (Orrville High School)

Amy March: Chelsea Ritter, a senior international business major from New Tripoli (Northwestern Lehigh High School)

Meg March: Briana Hozak, a senior sociology major from Home (Marian Center Area High School)

Beth March: Tiffany Franck, a senior sociology major from Ephrata (Ephrata Senior High School)

Marmee: Amanda Stillings, a sophomore arts administration major from Sussex, N.J. (High Point Regional High School)

*Aunt March: Mariah West, a junior criminal justice administration major from Minden, Nev. (Sierra Lutheran High School)

Theodore Laurence III: Adam Tapparo, a junior sociology major from Beaver (Beaver Area High School)

*Mr. Laurence: John Flanigan IV, a senior computer forensics major from Frostburg, Md. (Calvary Christian Academy)

Professor Bhaer: Dawson Laabs, a sophomore information technology major from Washington (Washington High School)

Mrs. Kirk: Olivia Long, a junior business management major from Burgettstown (Avella Area Junior-Senior High School)

*Helga: Larissa Bray, a sophomore mathematics major from Murrysville (Trinity Christian High School)

Clarissa: Lori Williams, a freshman early childhood education major from Mount Clare, W.Va. (Bridgeport High School)

*Braxton: Austin Orth, a sophomore computer science major from Meyersdale (Lighthouse Christian Academy)

*Rodrigo and Choreographer: Jordan Totty, a junior forensic science major from Temecula, Calif. (Cornerstone Christian School)

*Rodrigo 2: Emily Haywood, a sophomore digital design major from Claysville (McGuffey Area School District)

*Old Knight: Mike Merten, a freshman history major from Columbia, N.J. (North Warren Regional High School)

Chief Hag: Emily Mielcarek, a freshman international culture major from Orchard Park N.Y. (Orchard Park High School)

*Chief Troll: Katie Shultz, a junior human services major from Venetia (Peters Township High School)

Ensemble: 

  • Denell Cormany, a freshman early childhood and special education major from Medina, Ohio (Buckeye Senior High School)
  • Annie McGlaughlin, a freshman communication sports broadcasting and information major from Pittsburgh (Brentwood Middle-High School)
  • Brittany Stowe, a sophomore psychology major from Millville, N.J. (Millville Senior High School)
  • Vocal Director: Tome Custer
  • Choreographer: Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science at Waynesburg University 
  • Stage Manager: Leysha Stickles, a freshman creative writing major from Bellefonte (Bellefonte Area High School
  • Additional Crew:
    • David O'Donaghue, a freshman with an undeclared major from Waynesburg (Waynesburg Central High School)
    • Tyler Wolfe, a freshman communication electronic media major from Parkton, Md. (Hereford High School)
    • Members of the Lights & Sound Tech class

*Cast members who are also part of the ensemble

Reservations are strongly suggested. Seats may be reserved by calling 724-852-3226 or visit waynesburg.ticketleap.com/little-women.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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First semester freshman year, I anxiously sat waiting for my second class of the day to begin. My Survey of Music course had just let out and as I trekked across campus, gasping for air as I climbed the hill to Buhl Hall, I wondered what else was in store for me.

High school was over. College was a new animal.

I took a seat in the front near the door, not wanting to draw attention to myself, but still wanting to get as much as I could from the lecture. As students filed through the door, I pulled out my fresh notebook, a mechanical pencil and my agenda, making sure everything was labeled properly (some things wouldn’t change) and that I had what I needed.

When I finally looked up, a man shuffled into the room whistling as he closed the door behind him. He set his things on the desk in the front of the room and then turned around to write his name on the board.

“My name is Dr. Bob Randolph,” he said over his shoulder as he wrote. “But you can call me Dr. Bob.”

When I enrolled at Waynesburg, I wasn’t sure exactly what I wanted to do with my life, so I declared my major as “exploring.” During freshman orientation, I met with my given advisor. As we sat across from each other she showed me my schedule for the semester, which had been put together based on my interests and general requirements. Her red pen pointed at each line, creating a small dot at the beginning of each course name.

·Survey of Music

·College Composition I

·Environmental Biology

·Fiat Lux

When her pen settled on a line that read “Introduction to Creative Writing” a sudden surge of excitement took over. I was going to write.

Dr. Bob turned around and gave a reassuring smile to the room full of unsure freshman students, settling on my own nervous face for a moment before continuing. He told us what the class was about and the more he talked, the more drawn in I became. We were going to write fiction, poetry and a small memoir. I could not wait to get started. The first thing we would write would be a flash fiction story—500 words, due the following week.

I became intent on creating a suspense filled award winner. The idea for the story came quickly and I feverishly typed out the plot line. My story was about a young woman whose husband had gone to war and died, or so she thought. She mourned over their pictures together, remembering the day she watched him climb onto the plane. One stormy night she wandered out to their old creaky barn and found a letter from him. He was alive. They weren’t safe. He would send for her.

As funny as it all sounds to me now as I look back on that semester (and that ridiculous story), my freshman self was intrigued—emotionally invested. Full of new ideas and concepts for stories, I had found a passion. By the middle of that semester I was in my advisor’s office proudly declaring my major as English, creative writing.

What I have learned as a creative writing major at Waynesburg is far more than how to write a compelling story. I have learned how to incorporate new ideas into otherwise tedious writing, I have learned how to show emotion in a way that relates to those I am trying to appeal, and I have learned how to write grammatically correct, effective pieces of work.

Story-telling, I have found, is an art form. Through it, we become inspired, we feel and we dream. Creative writing is more than writing poetry, fiction and nonfiction. It is observing and understanding the world and those in it; it’s sharing experiences with people from various demographics; and it’s coming up with new ways to explain the things that affect us all as human beings.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Kayla_Painting.jpgHow art courses at Waynesburg have changed my life (as a non-major).

1. The first time I picked up a paintbrush was my sophomore year at Waynesburg. It was the fall term and as I scoured the thin book of offered courses, I stumbled upon an acrylics class, open to all majors. Aside from some sketching here and there, I had never put much effort in to becoming an artist; all I wanted to draw were horses. I had spent my childhood drawing horses until I nearly mastered them. They ran, jumped and reared on the page, never accompanied by a scene of any sort, just a ghost on a sheet of printer paper. Simply put, I couldn’t draw anything else. It was difficult for me to envision myself painting, but I had heard the professor graded based on progress not talent (friendly to anyone with a true interest in learning) so I joined. In a few short weeks, I found myself consumed in the technique of putting paint to canvas— the smooth, gentle glide of a brush and the act of finishing my own work-of-art. It was after my first painting that I (reluctantly) called myself an artist.

2. That fall semester my sophomore year proved to be a challenge, yet, when my feet found their way to the art room time stopped. I sat at the long table with my easel, pushing my brush against the canvas sheet, and I felt my mind lift from the haze of upcoming exams and papers. I couldn’t get enough of the freedom I felt when I was covered in paint, leaving fingerprints on the things I touched. When I realized just how therapeutic painting had become for me, I decided to order more supplies and bring the studio to my own kitchen. The sink, table and floor quickly became their own masterpieces, dripping with paint to my mother’s disliking, while I worked on my paintings. I allowed my thoughts to drift off to happier places where the world I envisioned was the world I became a part of, not the one I actually lived in.

3. Art, I have found, is not always realistic or the popular definition of beauty, yet as I stand in front of a sculpture or a painting with its odd limbs and colors, suspended in midair, I find myself lost in it amidst a lack of understanding. I wander toward it, staring, hoping I’ll have that “ah ha” moment where it becomes clear what exactly is in front of me. I never do, but the interest remains. I continue to look, hopelessly. Questions fill my mind, pressing me to think outside of my normal worldviews. Picasso, Warhol, Kandinsky, what dreamlike places did you travel while you transposed your thoughts to paper and paint to canvas? I want to know where you’ve been.

4. There are nights when I look at the blue and orange sky shifting to pinks and purples over tree branched mountain tops and I want to scoop them up and spread them over a fresh, white canvas, letting the colors mold into one another as they kiss the corners of the page. I want to mark that image forever in my mind, hang it on the wall or mount it in a gallery for the world to see the things I have seen in that very moment. Sometimes I grab my camera to keep that image tucked away, somewhere, for a second glance, but what I have found, through my art courses, is nothing can quite capture an image the same as an artist’s eye.

5. When I think about the peculiarity in the nature of a piece of art, I think of God and His own designs. What inspires God to mold, cut, mix and scrape his creations into their final forms? With infinite amounts of color, materials and tools, the possibilities are endless, yet he chose to create me. What greater, peculiar, humbling love could a person ever encounter?

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