Super User

Super User has not set their biography yet

Posted by on in Blog

b2ap3_thumbnail_Kayla_Painting.jpgHow art courses at Waynesburg have changed my life (as a non-major).

1. The first time I picked up a paintbrush was my sophomore year at Waynesburg. It was the fall term and as I scoured the thin book of offered courses, I stumbled upon an acrylics class, open to all majors. Aside from some sketching here and there, I had never put much effort in to becoming an artist; all I wanted to draw were horses. I had spent my childhood drawing horses until I nearly mastered them. They ran, jumped and reared on the page, never accompanied by a scene of any sort, just a ghost on a sheet of printer paper. Simply put, I couldn’t draw anything else. It was difficult for me to envision myself painting, but I had heard the professor graded based on progress not talent (friendly to anyone with a true interest in learning) so I joined. In a few short weeks, I found myself consumed in the technique of putting paint to canvas— the smooth, gentle glide of a brush and the act of finishing my own work-of-art. It was after my first painting that I (reluctantly) called myself an artist.

2. That fall semester my sophomore year proved to be a challenge, yet, when my feet found their way to the art room time stopped. I sat at the long table with my easel, pushing my brush against the canvas sheet, and I felt my mind lift from the haze of upcoming exams and papers. I couldn’t get enough of the freedom I felt when I was covered in paint, leaving fingerprints on the things I touched. When I realized just how therapeutic painting had become for me, I decided to order more supplies and bring the studio to my own kitchen. The sink, table and floor quickly became their own masterpieces, dripping with paint to my mother’s disliking, while I worked on my paintings. I allowed my thoughts to drift off to happier places where the world I envisioned was the world I became a part of, not the one I actually lived in.

3. Art, I have found, is not always realistic or the popular definition of beauty, yet as I stand in front of a sculpture or a painting with its odd limbs and colors, suspended in midair, I find myself lost in it amidst a lack of understanding. I wander toward it, staring, hoping I’ll have that “ah ha” moment where it becomes clear what exactly is in front of me. I never do, but the interest remains. I continue to look, hopelessly. Questions fill my mind, pressing me to think outside of my normal worldviews. Picasso, Warhol, Kandinsky, what dreamlike places did you travel while you transposed your thoughts to paper and paint to canvas? I want to know where you’ve been.

4. There are nights when I look at the blue and orange sky shifting to pinks and purples over tree branched mountain tops and I want to scoop them up and spread them over a fresh, white canvas, letting the colors mold into one another as they kiss the corners of the page. I want to mark that image forever in my mind, hang it on the wall or mount it in a gallery for the world to see the things I have seen in that very moment. Sometimes I grab my camera to keep that image tucked away, somewhere, for a second glance, but what I have found, through my art courses, is nothing can quite capture an image the same as an artist’s eye.

5. When I think about the peculiarity in the nature of a piece of art, I think of God and His own designs. What inspires God to mold, cut, mix and scrape his creations into their final forms? With infinite amounts of color, materials and tools, the possibilities are endless, yet he chose to create me. What greater, peculiar, humbling love could a person ever encounter?

Hits: 436

Posted by on in News

b2ap3_thumbnail_Monogram Small.jpgWaynesburg University will host a Senior Art Exhibition for Nathanael Long Monday, March 24, through Wednesday, April 16. An opening reception will take place Monday, March 31, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Benedum Fine Arts Gallery. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend.

Senior art exhibitions take place each semester to provide veteran art students with a platform to showcase the products of a practiced creative process. Students spend four years creating and preserving pieces they are most proud of for this very occasion. 

Long’s exhibit includes paintings, photography, sculptures and ceramics pieces he has worked on throughout his academic career, concentrating on abstract art for the purposes of the show.

“Art is something I have enjoyed ever since I can remember,” Long said. “I realize now that I will always be a student of art because there is always more to learn. I like the challenge of trying to make interesting compositions using line, form and color to express myself.”

The Art Program at Waynesburg University allows students to mold, paint and sketch works of their imagination while providing the tools to grasp a comprehensive knowledge of techniques and history. Students hone abilities through class discussion, demonstrations and exhibits. 

Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, or by appointment. For more information call 724-852-3247.

# # #

Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 324

Posted by on in Alumni

Biology (Pre-med)

Family Medicine Resident practicing at Cornerstone Care & Mon General Hospital

Mt. Morris, Pa., & Morgantown, W.Va.| Osteopathy

Additional Info:

  • Psi Sigma Alpha/ Member of American Medical Women's Association
  • Doctorate in Osteopathy, West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine, 2013
  • Bachelor of Science, Waynesburg University, 2009

“Four years at Waynesburg University prepared me in more ways than I thought for the career path I have chosen.  As a physician, my faith, which was strengthened and shaped as a college student, has played into my career. Without a grounded faith in Christ, I would not be where I am today and I certainly would not be showing Christ's love to the patients I see each day.”

Hits: 94

Posted by on in Alumni

Larry Heck

Sports Medicine

Athletic Trainer for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE)

Kernersville, N.C. 

Previous:

  • Head Athletic Trainer for the Amsterdam Admirals in the NFL Europe;
  • Assistant Athletic Trainer for the San Antonio Texans in the Canadian Football League
  • CFL
Education 
  • Bachelor of Science, Waynesburg University, 1992

“Waynesburg gave me a great education at a small, friendly campus. I gained hands-on experience and the knowledge I needed to pass my National Boards – which prepared me for my career in professional sports.”

Hits: 125

Posted by on in Blog

I have been a student at Waynesburg University for four years now and one of the first things I would tell anyone interested in applying is that the faculty here are amazing. Waynesburg is a small university; therefore, its focus is to provide a personal learning experience to its students, which it does quite well.

A great example of Waynesburg’s personable faculty, from my own experience, occurred this past semester.

Before the fall 2013 term began, two of my scheduled courses were rescheduled for the following semester. I was anxious. I had no idea what I wanted to replace them with, and it was the start of my senior year. I needed more credits.

When I found an open seat in a Biblical ministries class titled “Wisdom Literature,” I quickly joined, not fully knowing what to expect.

Now, I have always been secure in my beliefs and understandings of faith, especially from what I have learned as a student here, but when I entered class on the first day, I shrunk down in my seat, my mind racing with insecurities. I had not taken many of the classes my classmates had and I was not a ministry major, like the majority of them. I felt insignificant and incompetent. Moreover, I felt like I didn’t belong.

Determined to drop the class out of fear of embarrassment and failure, I e-mailed the professor, describing to him my reasons for wanting to leave, though I didn’t need his permission. I had expected him to tell me “I understand and agree if you are uncomfortable, you should drop the course,” but the answer he gave was considerably different.

When I opened his correspondence, what he told me was “hang in there, enjoy, and feel free to stop by my office anytime for help. No bad questions.”

Through the course of the semester, we studied the Bible, primarily the books of Job, Psalms, Proverbs and Ecclesiastes. Each class period was spent reading aloud the book of study, then discussing its meaning as well as how it applied then and how it applies today.

After each class, the professor would ask me how I was doing and what questions, if any, I had. He sent me examples of things we would be doing for class such as blog posts and reading responses, knowing I was not accustomed to his teaching methods like many of my classmates. I couldn’t believe how much he cared.

As the semester unfolded, I found myself becoming engaged in the topics. What I had not allowed myself to recognize on that first day was that I had been given a unique opportunity to further my understanding of the Word of God in addition to furthering my overall education.

By the end of the course, the amount of questions I had shrunk significantly and I found myself branching off on my own, sharing my opinions and interests, thanks to the help of a professor who was willing to go above and beyond for one student’s understanding.

What I have learned through my college experience at Waynesburg is not only are people willing to help when you need it, they often will go out of their way to make a difference in your life, showing you what you are capable of even when you aren’t sure. To me, that alone speaks of the quality of education I am receiving.

Hits: 337