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b2ap3_thumbnail_Frick-and-Charlie-Gerow.jpgHope Frick, a senior public relations major from Elizabethtown, Pa., met Quantum Communications’ CEO, Charlie Gerow, on Waynesburg University’s campus during her junior year. After making a positive impression, Frick was offered an internship with the company in Harrisburg, Pa., for the summer of 2012 and, eventually, 2013.

“Charlie is extremely well connected in almost every political circle throughout the nation, so I jumped at the opportunity to work with someone so influential,” said Frick.

Working in close proximity to the state Capitol had its perks. The environment not only helped Frick see the interworking’s of a highly populated, central location, it also enabled her to meet with Governor Tom Corbett at Quantum’s June Policy Briefing, which was Frick’s favorite moment of her internship.

On a typical day, Frick conducted online news searches for Quantum’s clients and managed the blog, Facebook and Twitter accounts for the Friends of Natural Gas Alliance. Additionally, Frick helped plan a few of Quantum’s monthly events which host several business leaders, politicians, reporters and other associates of the company to an open forum discussion.

According to Frick, her time spent with faculty, in departmental coursework and as secretary of Waynesburg University’s Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) chapter at Waynesburg gave her the confidence she needed to excel within her tasks at Quantum.

“As a student, Hope took advantage of every opportunity presented to her and always went above and beyond course or department requirements,” said Pamela Cunningham, lecturer at Waynesburg University. “In doing so, Hope has become driven and even more passionate about the field that, in my humble opinion, will be fortunate to have her.”

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A 40-hour-work week as an intern at Fulton Mortgage Company was more than processing mortgage applications, performing compliance checks and contacting employers and insurance companies for junior forensic accounting major Alyssa Daniel.

Her experience as a mortgage processor was something very few interns have the opportunity to experience: upbeat.

“I would have to say the funniest thing I did was help some people decorate our coworker's chair and desk with bubble wrap while he was at lunch,” Daniel jokingly said.

The ability to interact with her coworkers in a friendly, lighthearted manner was something memorable for Daniel, but her internship proved to be greater than good memories made with colleagues. It allowed the Manheim, Pa., native to grow accustomed to the type of office environment and career path she desires to obtain in the future.

From May 18 to August 9, Daniel worked in the office as a mortgage processor intern in which she had the opportunity to gain much knowledge in the field from day to day.

“My favorite aspect about the internship was learning to analyze tax returns to determine monthly income,” said Daniel.

With courses such as Investments and Federal Income Tax offered at Waynesburg University, Daniel was mentally prepared to take on her responsibilities at Fulton. Moreover, Daniel’s involvement in activities during semesters as a varsity tennis player; teaching assistant to Anthony Bocchini, professor of business administration at Waynesburg University; treasurer for American Medical Student Association (AMSA) and Waynesburg University women’s tennis Fellowship of Christian Athlete’s (FCA) representative, only accentuated her merit for the position.

“Alyssa was an excellent choice for Fulton because of her strong work ethic and her professional attitude,” said Bocchini.

Through a recommendation made by an employee at Fulton, Daniel was instructed how to apply for the internship. After submitting an application and participating in a phone interview, she was offered a position for the summer of 2013.

“I applied for the internship because I wanted to do something that would give me work experience in my major field as well as help boost my resume,” said Daniel.

Even already having an idea of the things she would be doing at her internship, Daniel was still unaware of what the day-to-day procedures would be when she stepped foot in the office.

“I didn't really know what to expect going into the internship, since I didn't know much about mortgage banking, but it was definitely an enjoyable experience,” said Daniel.

As a student, Daniel receives the business department scholarship, Leadership scholarship, Margaret Bell Miller scholarship and AB Miller scholarship at Waynesburg University, which illustrates the intensity of devotion she places on learning and growing academically.

That same commitment was also utilized during her internship, making the experience as a whole, a success.

“I learned a lot of new information this summer that I can take and apply to my career in the future,” said Daniel. “And on a personal level, I made friends and networking connections that I really value.”

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For senior business management major Alexander Henry, interning at PNC Bank for the summer of 2013 meant having the chance to complete significant tasks for the benefit of the company, which was something he looked forward to every day.

“I decided to apply because I knew it would be an awesome resume builder, and I would get some great real world experience,” said Henry.

PNC is a company which offers a wide range of services for their customers, ranging anywhere from corporations, government entities, individuals, small businesses and more.

The Bridgeville, Pa., native worked 40 hours-a-week for the company June 12 through August 16 within the Finance Credit Reporting portion of PNC.

After applying online, Henry began the grueling interview process which consisted of three phone interviews and a fourth face-to-face interview in Pittsburgh, Pa., after which he acquired the title of Financial Analyst intern.

As a member of the Waynesburg University Yellow Jacket football team, president of the Investments Club and vice president of ENACTUS at Waynesburg, Henry understood the effort needed to persevere.

“Alex is a strong student with a commitment to excellence,” said Joshua Chicarelli, assistant professor of business administration at Waynesburg University. “What sets Alex apart is his ability to think logically and then follow up on his thoughts with strong research and critical thinking skills.”

Henry’s weekly tasks consisted of assisting financial reporting; creating workbooks to calculate the financial impact and TDRs by concession type variances’; creating a segment equity balance and preferred dividend forecast; creating numerous VLookup functions within Excel; and performing peer analysis.

Overall, Henry’s internship was what he expected and more, giving him an experience of a lifetime.

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Being accepted into a program available to graduate students currently enrolled in a specific program at a specific university is something nearly impossible for most outsiders.

With perseverance and a thorough interview, however, Angelic Wray, a senior forensic science major, became the first student outside of Arcadia University’s Forensic Science graduate program to become a Research Assistant and Mentor for the G. John DiGregorio Summer Mentoring Program at the Forensic Mentors Institute (FMI).

“I wanted to expose myself to research opportunities in my field, determine what field of forensics was best for me and challenge myself to a side of chemistry I was uncomfortable with,” Wray said.

Like many who have applied for and received internship opportunities, Wray’s experience consisted of tremendous commitment. Over a period of several months, Wray corresponded with the program director as well as the entire FMI staff through a series of emails where she described her interest in the program and her experience in forensics, biology and chemistry at Waynesburg.

From June 21 to Aug. 24, 2013, Wray put forth 367 hours of research and mentorship where she assisted students with hands-on learning such as data analysis, lab techniques, presentations and public speaking practice.

Her focused research project was to “validate the basic liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) developed in house using the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS) for the screening of common drugs in urine.”

“Samples were analyzed using the SCAN-MT and SCAN-MT DER method on the GC-MS for the detection of common drugs,” Wray said.

The G. John DiGregorio Summer Mentoring Program is an eight-week program held annually during the summer as an opportunity for high school students to become prepared for college and the forensic science field through practical learning and mentorship.

“I expected the internship to be showing students how to do different science techniques and apply it to a research project,” Wray said. “However, it was much more than what I expected. I needed to not only show them how to conduct authentic research, but use their findings as a starting point for the experiment.”

Trying to get high school students to understand certain science terminology, concepts and procedures was Wray’s biggest challenge, but watching them grow was something well worth the effort.

“Many [students] started out shy and had very little public speaking skills, but developed great confidence by the end of the program,” Wray said. “Just knowing I was able to bring that growth out of the students brought me great joy. Every day was a combination of great work, disaster and fun.”

As a student at Waynesburg, Wray is involved in several activities. She is a member of Waynesburg’s American Chemical Society (ACS), EcoStewards Club, Forensic Science Club, Future Alumni Society, Gospel Choir, Leadership Scholarship and is a Waynesburg University Student Ambassador.

Wray credits her confidence and precise problem solving skills, among other things, during her internship this summer to her involvement in activities, clubs and courses at Waynesburg.
Not only was an impact made on Wray through her experience, an impact was also made on the students she challenged. Left in the form of a short “mentor appreciation” note, student mentees claimed Wray inspired them to become better scientists, making it one of the most enjoyable summers they have ever experienced.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_4-Robert-Page.jpgWaynesburg University will host its eighth annual Conducting Symposium Friday, Jan. 31, through Saturday, Feb. 1. The Symposium, directed by guest clinician Dr. Robert Page, will be held in the Marsh Center in Roberts Chapel on the campus of Waynesburg University.

This year’s Symposium is available to both band and choir directors, and will feature rehearsals with Page and event ensembles. The event ensembles for this year include the Waynesburg University Lamplighters Concert Choir, featuring members of the Mendelssohn Choir, and the Waynesburg University Symphonic Band, featuring members of the North Suburban Concert Band.

Participants will have the opportunity to witness Page’s rehearsal techniques during the ensemble rehearsals Friday evening. Also, they will have the opportunity to hear two lecture presentations and may choose to participate as a conductor in order to receive individual critique from Page.

Page is conductor emeritus of the world-renowned Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh, Pa. He has conducted more than 30 American regional orchestras including his work best known with the Cleveland, Ohio; Philadelphia, Pa.; and Pittsburgh, Pa., orchestras.

He occupies the Paul Mellon chair at Carnegie-Mellon University and has commissioned works from composers as varied as Galbraith Ginastera, Korte, Rands and Rorem.

Registration information is available at www.waynesburg.edu/undergraduate/undergraduate-majors/fine-arts.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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