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Waynesburg University will offer two camps for Boy Scouts this summer, Life to Eagle Camp and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) for Scouts Camp. Both camps will offer scouts the opportunity to earn specialized merit badges taught by Waynesburg University professors.

Life to Eagle and STEM for Scouts camps will offer small camp classes with individualized instruction. Waynesburg University professors who are experienced in their badge topic and are registered with the Laurel Highlands Council as Merit Badge Counselors will teach all of the badge sessions.

Registration for both camps is limited to the first 36 scouts. Scouts can provide a roommate preference to room with a friend when registering. 

Life to Eagle Camp

Waynesburg University will host Life to Eagle Camp Friday, July 17, through Sunday, July 19. The Life to Eagle Camp will offer Scouts with Life or Star Rank the opportunity to earn up to three merit badges in one weekend.

Available badges include citizenship in the community, citizenship in the nation, citizenship in the world, communications, emergency prep, environmental science, family life, first aid, personal fitness and sustainability. All of the badges offered are required for obtaining Eagle Rank.

Assistance with Eagle Project planning and portfolios will also be provided, and Scouts will be offered the opportunity to work on their Eagle Project portfolio in Waynesburg University’s state-of-the-art Mac lab in lieu of a third merit badge.

The total cost for the camp is $200, and includes badge instruction, meals and lodging. 

To register, visit http://www.waynesburg.edu/lifetoeaglecamp.

STEM for Scouts Camp

Waynesburg University’s STEM for Scouts Camp will be held Monday, July 20, through Friday, July 24. Boy Scouts entering sixth grade through current high school seniors are invited to attend.

Scouts will have the opportunity to earn up to five science, technology, engineering and math related merit badges. Waynesburg University will offer 15 different badges including astronomy, aviation, bird study, chemistry, digital technology, environmental science, electronics, engineering, geocaching, photography and oceanography, among others. Scouts may choose their five badges when registering.

The total cost for the camp is $350, which includes lodging in air-conditioned dorms, three meals a day in the dining facilities of the University, five merit badges, a t-shirt, a patch and all activities. 

Activities include evening campfires and fun, hands-on STEM activities. Scouts will work on Boy Scouts of America (BSA) NOVA science awards during camp. The Boy Scouts of America's NOVA Awards program incorporates learning with fun activities and exposure to STEM-related fields.

To register, visit http://info.waynesburg.edu/STEMcamp.

The Boy Scouts of America is one of the nation's largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizations. The BSA provides a program for young people that builds character, trains them in the responsibilities of participating citizenship and develops personal fitness.

For more information, contact scouting@waynesburg.edu.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Waynesburg University will host summer Visitation Days for transfer students, high school students and their families Friday, June 26, and Friday, July 17.

“It is an important step for prospective candidates for admission and their families to visit on these summer visitation days to learn about our mission and commitment to academic excellence and outcomes,” said Jessica Sumpter, director of admissions at Waynesburg University. “Through these events, visiting families will discover the value of the Waynesburg University experience.”

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. in Roberts Chapel both days. After check-in, students will have the opportunity to meet with faculty and staff in their elected majors, learn about admissions and financial aid, take a tour of the campus and enjoy lunch in the Benedum Dining Hall.

The purpose of Visitation Days is to provide prospective students and their families with the opportunity to experience Waynesburg University. For many students, this is their first visit to campus, so it is important that they get a chance to tour it, meet with professors and learn more about the admissions and financial aid processes. 

Approximately 1,400 students are currently enrolled in Waynesburg University’s undergraduate programs. More than 70 academic concentrations are offered at the University, which maintains its status as one of the least expensive private institutions in Pennsylvania.

For more information or to register for a summer Visitation Day, call 1-800-225-7393.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Waynesburg University’s Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) will offer Level I Summer Institute, a free professional development opportunity featuring methods and materials from the Library of Congress. 

Level I Summer Institute will take place Monday, June 29, to Wednesday, July 1, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Waynesburg University’s main campus. Participants will earn up to 15 PDE Act 48 Activity Hours.

All educators are invited to explore online resources by expanding their understanding of the Library of Congress and discovering effective strategies for teaching with primary sources. 

The program will include an overview of the Library of Congress TPS Program, a tutorial of how to select and use the free digitized collections of primary sources from www.loc.gov and instruction of aligning existing classroom activities with Common Core Standards. 

Interactive strategies and methods, ready-to-use classroom activities and project development and collaboration will also be offered. 

Lunch is included. To register, visit: https://forms.waynesburg.edu/machfoh orm/view.php?id=365230

For more information, contact Sue Wise, associate director of the TPS Program at Waynesburg University, at swise@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3377.

Funded by a grant from the Library of Congress, TPS at Waynesburg University provides professional development for in-service and pre-service teachers. TPS at Waynesburg University works with schools, universities, libraries and foundations to help teachers throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania use the Library's digitized primary sources to enrich their classroom instruction.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Tagged in: TPS TPS news
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Today we visited the indigenous village of Ngöbe and the people there. To get there, we took a two-hour truck ride up the mountain. We got to tour an organic coffee farm run by the local people. Sustainability is beginning to trend in businesses all throughout Panama, even in the remotest of villages. 

The members of this village live a simple life, but it is far from boring. The women wear a beautifully colored traditional dress called the Ngwä. For lunch, we ate a traditional meal of a salad with a homemade dressing, rice and plantains. It was delicious. While we ate, there were several children playing and chattering in the local language nearby. 

We asked to play soccer with them, but they were extremely shy. It seemed they don’t receive many visitors from outside the village, and didn’t know how to respond. All the same, the people were very welcoming and smiled patiently when we spoke our broken Spanish. I loved learning about and seeing their culture. It is uninterrupted by technology and the outside world, but full of life and meaning. 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_5-21-Narasimhan-2_20150522-144111_1.jpgThis internship keeps getting cooler. Today, we had a troop of wild howlers hanging around the sanctuary, and our babies actually got into the trees and interacted with them! We call this troop R2D2, and all of their names have something to do with Star Wars. The dominant male’s name is Yoda, and the other male is Vader. 

It’s interesting because no matter where a howler troop is, you will almost always find the dominant male in the center of the group. Stevie, our blind howler, was playing with Mace, a baby in the troop. It was adorable. Rugby is still a little shy with other howlers, but she is getting there. Watching the wild howlers and capuchins is unlike anything I have ever seen. It’s one thing to see them in photographs and to learn about their behavior in a textbook, but nothing compares to seeing it in person. I really enjoy just sitting peacefully and watching. 

Another cool thing we are doing is documenting howler behavior. The species has been neglected in this area, and so the research we are doing is extremely important. Every day we do several behavioral follows, either focusing on one baby or both. For about forty-five minutes, we document their every behavior, which can be anything from a vocalization to foraging. This is called an ethogram, and it takes a while to get the hang of. We are also identifying all of the individuals in each troop to try to get a population count. As of right now, it is not known how many howlers live in Panama, further adding to the importance of our research.

My favorite part of the internship so far has been interacting with the monkeys. The babies are frustrating at times, and it sometimes feels like babysitting spoiled toddlers. We try to keep them in the trees and off the ground as much as possible, to mimic a normal upbringing and get them used to a typical howler lifestyle (wild howlers spend almost no time on the ground). Sometimes, however, the babies do not want to get into a tree and just want to cuddle. Sometimes they will bite and run away, resulting in a wild monkey chase. However, watching them in the trees and playing with them is so rewarding, and they have the ability to make anyone’s heart melt, no matter how hard they bite.

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