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b2ap3_thumbnail_stover-2.jpgWaynesburg University Stover Scholars visited leaders at the Pentagon, Supreme Court, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and The Washington Post Monday, Nov. 10.

The twenty Stover Scholars first met Senior Civilian Assistant to the Secretary of the Air Force Eric Pierce at the Pentagon. Following an intriguing tour of the building and September 11 monuments, Pierce shared his insights on defense, military strategy and leadership along with his journey on the D.C. political path. Matt Kenney, a junior computer science major from Northumberland, Pa., commented, “Eric Pierce gave an upfront and honest perspective about the current state of defense.”

The group then visited the Supreme Court of the United States and sat in on the 11:00 a.m. oral arguments. “Seeing the oral arguments at the Supreme Court was amazing. It is one thing to read the justices’ opinions in a textbook, but to watch the justices engage in questioning based on their judicial philosophies made the court come alive,” remarked Gina Robinson, a senior English major from Lower Burrell, Pa. 

The Scholars then met Judge Janice Rogers Brown at the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Judge Brown laid out her constitutional, political and moral insights for the students through her own experiences as a judge in Washington, D.C., and as a justice on the Supreme Court for the state of California. She inspired and encouraged the Scholars to learn from their failures by failing better the next time. 

At The Washington Post, the Stover Scholars met with reporter Chris Cillizza who described the evolution and impact of his daily online column and blog, The Fix.  Nika Anschuetz, a junior communication major from Zelienople, Pa., said, “As an aspiring journalist, meeting with Chris Cillizza was both beneficial and inspiring. His views about journalism and politics were refreshing.”

The Stover Scholars ended their D.C. trip by meeting Stifel, Nicolaus and Incorporated investment banker Jim Rowan. Rowan, although living on the edge of Washington, D.C., for many years, provided a detailed discussion of an outsider’s view of the political scene within the city. He described the challenges facing businesses from government regulation.

Commenting on the D.C. trip, sophomore pre-law major Paige Carter from Coraopolis, Pa., said, “The dynamics that we experienced today amazed me. This trip fostered in-depth conversation and deep informed thought regarding foreign, domestic and legal policy.” Freshman entrepreneurship major Kiana Levi from Venetia, Pa., commented, "This trip opened my eyes, challenged my political thought and strengthened my confidence to express my opinion.”

b2ap3_thumbnail_stover-3.jpgStover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership Director Dr. Lawrence Stratton said, "The in-depth interactions between Stover Scholars and prominent leaders in law, military policy, journalism and business, and with each other, was commendable.”

The Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership is a unique Waynesburg University program dedicated to transforming the political sphere in the context of Christian Ethics and American constitutionalism.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Paul R. Stewart Museum

Did you know that Waynesburg University has its very own museum? The basement of Miller Hall is dedicated to the historic preservations of this University. After taking a stroll through the museum, I took a moment to ponder why I hadn’t gone to see it sooner in my college career! There are so many interesting artifacts like course catalogues from the 1800s, drawings from one of the first female graduates and an old football used to win the championship game decades ago. Even though current students weren’t a part of those times, we are still connected and folded into the purpose of this institution. It was fascinating to see how much the University has grown since 1849 and how the traditions from that era have remained steady and strong.

Read the syllabus AND keep it handy

Let me make this very clear. The syllabus is your best friend. Do not make the mistake of shoving it far into the bottom of your backpack on the first day of class and never looking at it again. Keep a syllabus for each class handy so you can refer back to it when necessary.

*True Story* - Recently, I had a professor who started handing out an exam immediately after walking into the classroom. Unfortunately, most of the class, including myself, did not remember there was an exam that day. The professor proceeded to explain that the *syllabus* has every exam clearly listed out for the entire semester. Don’t be the student to make this same mistake! Read the syllabus, highlight and mark down dates in your planner. Your future self will thank you.

Seniors, take your resume to Marie Coffman

If you’re like me and the sound of the word “resume” makes you shudder in despair, I suggest you take a trip to the third floor of Stover and knock on Marie Coffman’s door. She is the Director of Career Services and Placement and is an aid to any student who needs help with resumes, cover letters, references, etc. After speaking to several of my classmates, I felt strongly encouraged to seek her assistance with my future career planning. Waynesburg University has a plethora of people who are here to help students. Utilize these resources while you can!

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Waynesburg University’s nursing programs were recently reaccredited for the next ten years by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

The University was notified by the CCNE Board of Commissioners this week that its baccalaureate degree in nursing (BSN), master's degree in nursing (MSN) and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs met all four CCNE accreditation standards with no compliance concerns related to the key elements of any of the standards.

“Accreditation is indicative of program quality,” said Dr. Nancy Mosser, chair of the University’s Department of Nursing. “Current and prospective students can be assured that a rigorous review process of the programs occurred and program outcomes were met.”

The CCNE accreditation standards were amended in 2013, and the University’s Department of Nursing was held to the new standards. The programs were evaluated in regard to mission and governance, institutional commitment and resources, curriculum and teaching-learning practices, and assessment and achievement of program outcomes.

Over the course of a year, a self-study document was written and an evidence room was created to provide documentation of ongoing committee, faculty and student work.

A team of five evaluators visited the campus from April 7 through 9 to verify and amplify information provided in the self-study document. The evaluators met with senior staff, students, alumni, chief nursing officers in area hospitals and community advisory boards for the Department of Nursing. The evaluators visited both main campus and the Monroeville Center, where Graduate and Professional Studies Nursing Programs are located.

CCNE accreditation is a nongovernmental peer review process that operates in accordance with nationally recognized standards established for the practice of accreditation in the United States.

The Commission ensures the quality and integrity of baccalaureate, graduate and residency programs in nursing. The Commission serves the public interest by assessing and identifying programs that engage in effective educational practices. As a voluntary, self-regulatory process, CCNE accreditation supports and encourages continuing self-assessment by nursing programs and supports continuing growth and improvement of collegiate professional education and post-baccalaureate nurse residency programs.

For more information on the BSN program at Waynesburg University, contact the Office of Admissions at 1-800-225-7393. For information on the MSN or DNP programs, contact Sherri Stonecipher at 724-743-7617. 

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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11-12-megan-bayles.jpgWaynesburg University’s Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) Chapter president Megan Bayles recently received first place in a national public relations scholarship competition. 

Bayles, a junior public relations major from Carmichaels, Pa., is the first student from Southwestern Pennsylvania to have received the Betsy Plank PRSSA Scholarship. The award is granted annually to three public relations students who demonstrate dedication to the field, practical experience, academic excellence and proven leadership. 

“This scholarship award is one of the most distinguished student awards given by PRSSA,” said Richard Krause, chair of the Department of Communication, assistant professor of communication and faculty adviser to the PRSSA Chapter. “This award affirms all that Megan has accomplished in our chapter in a very short period of time.” 

Winners were recently announced at the PRSSA National Conference in Washington, D.C. For first place, Bayles received a $5,000 award.

“The entire event felt surreal. I was happy, excited, proud and honored, all at the same time,” Bayles said. “Since discovering all of the PRSSA scholarship opportunities and joining Waynesburg's Chapter, it has been my goal to apply for and win one of these prestigious awards.” 

Betsy Plank was the first woman to lead the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) President in 1973. She was chair of the U.S. Section of International Public Relations Association and co-chaired the 1987 commission to develop guidelines for the undergraduate public relations curriculum in U.S. colleges and universities.

“Betsy Plank is an inspiration to all aspiring public relations professionals, especially women,” Bayles said. “To have been awarded the opportunity to help carry on her amazing legacy is such a blessing.”   

Upon graduation from Waynesburg University, Bayles hopes to work in corporate public relations and obtain a Master’s degree in a communication-related field.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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The Waynesburg University Music Program will host its second Chamber Works concert of the semester Thursday, Nov. 20, at noon in the Marsh Center in Roberts Chapel. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend. 

This series of lunchtime concerts will include performances by the Beauty and Barber Shop Ensembles, the Chamber Strings Orchestra, Jazz Ensemble, Woodwind Ensemble, Brass Ensemble, Percussion Ensemble and the University Pipe and Drum Band. 

The concert allows the Waynesburg University student-ensembles to perform a great variety of styles of music in front of an audience of peers, teachers and friends. 

The audience is encouraged to bring a lunch and enjoy the hour-long event. For more information, contact Ronda DePriest at rdepries@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3420. 

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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