Blog

Subcategories from this category: Uncategorized

Posted by on in Blog
describe the image

I have always believed that service is an important part of society, but before my time at Waynesburg University, I had never been the type to give it. Not because I ever thought I was too good to serve, but more because I had never felt good enough to serve. Joining the Waynesburg community meant having to serve at some point during my college career, and I was anxious of how I could make a difference.

Little did I know, enrolling in service learning would change my life forever.

Having always loved animals, I chose to conduct my service work at the Humane Society of Greene County. Walking in on my first day, I had no idea what to expect.

When the director began discussing what I could do to help, I began praying they would involve no animal interaction whatsoever. In fact, on my first two days I kept busy scrubbing the inside and outside of every door in the building, setting packages of food on the shelves and working the front desk, answering phones and interacting with customers. I wanted to help the cause, but at a distance. Still, I felt my heart yearning for more.

That's when I was approached with a new request.

The director began talking with me about some of my passions and when I mentioned photography and writing, her face lit up. With a new website and an overload of incoming animals, I was asked if I could help. I could see where the conversation was going, but I wasn't sure I could do what she wanted me to.

Taking photographs of and writing articles about these animals meant getting up close and personal with every single one of them. It broke my heart to think I would have to see their suffering firsthand and tell them they wouldn't find what they were looking for from me; I couldn't give them the love and stability they were desperately searching to find.

But seeing the hope the director had, I accepted her proposition.

As I began working, I realized I had a lot to offer. I was nervous about using my gifts to serve, but God gave me the opportunity to shine and what began as a course requirement quickly developed into a passion for the greater good—helping animals find their “forever homes.”

In the words of Frederick Buechner, "The place God calls you to is where your deep gladness and the world's deep hunger meet."

To me, volunteering at the Human Society has not been fulfilling community service hours. It is a commitment fueled by a passion to make a difference in the lives of the animals, who can't do it for themselves. I know I made the right decision when I walked through those doors on the first day.

I know I was led there to make a difference the best way I can—through the gifts God has provided me. I thank Him, and the staff at the shelter, for encouraging me and allowing me to find my passion for serving.

Tagged in: Kayla Student Blog
Hits: 744

Posted by on in Blog
IMG 4321

When I matriculated into Waynesburg University as a freshman, I had no idea what to expect. It was an uncomfortably hot day in August and the sidewalks were crowded with families and new students—hundreds of faces I didn't know. I was terrified. Everything was about to change. I was entering the unknown with no one to catch me if I fell.

 

What had I gotten myself in to?

 

In high school, I was the girl who never quite knew where she belonged. I'll admit, it was my own fault, really. I had kept myself guarded, unwilling to take a chance at becoming something more than who I had limited myself to be. I was afraid of rejection. In my mind, keeping at a distance meant not getting hurt, but it also meant not being able to grow.

 

Attending college would force me to step out of my comfort zone and I didn't know if I was quite ready for that, but God knew what I needed and encouraged me to take the plunge.

 

“In God, whose word I praise—in God I trust and am not afraid. What can mere mortals do to me?” Psalm 56: 4 (NIV)

 

To my surprise, as my first weeks unfolded, I began finding comfort in my surroundings and the positive energy exuded around me. The people were welcoming. They smiled and held the door open for me, they asked me how I was doing, where I was from and what my future plans were, but most importantly, to me, they were open about their faith.

 

This is where I belonged.

 

When I attended Chapel for the first time, I was amazed to see a group of college students openly worshipping and praising God. The preconceived notions I had been fed through television shows and movies had given me an undesirable vision of what college was going to be like, but I was pleased to find things were different at Waynesburg. I could feel God's presence in the voices of those singing and in the words outwardly spoken.

 

When I found Waynesburg, my walk of faith began. Ready or not, God was there, telling me this was where I needed to be. Undoubtedly, I have a ways to go before I find my life's mission, but the seeds have been planted. God is at work in my life now more than ever, and I have Waynesburg to thank for igniting the flame.

 

I have no fear looking forward.

 

“For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” Jeremiah 29: 11 (NIV)


Hits: 480

Posted by on in Blog
IMG 0528

When I first stepped out of the car and onto the pavement, Waynesburg University looked like many of the small, private schools I had been touring for months. Historic brick buildings full of character, vibrant foliage and countless visiting squirrels scurrying across the sidewalks. But the one thing Waynesburg didn't have was the one thing I thought I wanted.

 

Little did I know, things were quickly about to change.

 

In my mind, I had always seen myself majoring in Equine studies, training world class horses and riders for the Olympics or maybe even becoming the next big “horse whisperer.” Nothing had intrigued me more in my life than the mind and power of a horse, and after years of riding lessons and recent horse ownership, I was more and more ready to take the plunge towards attaining what I thought was my dream.

 

I had found a couple of equine schools, great ones, actually. So what was the problem? Why was I stalling?

 

It was my senior year of high school, and I was tired and discouraged. I had no idea what I was supposed to do with my life and the monotonous campus touring hadn't come close to pointing me in the right direction for my future.

 

That was before I visited Waynesburg.

 

As I toured the campus, I found myself being drawn in. The smell of fresh cut grass and hamburgers on the grill, the smiles shared by students as we passed by and the quiet, peaceful sounds of birds chirping overhead, all reminded me of what home is supposed to feel like—an intimate community.

 

This was a place I could see myself in.

 

Beginning to pull away from the schools I had found before, I wondered if I was making the right choice. As many of us do, I was second guessing myself when my heart was trying to tell me it was alright to let go.

 

I needed an awakening.

 

Up until my Waynesburg visit, I had never pictured myself as a writer. Sure, in high school I had been told that I had a talent for it, but writing never drove me forward. My spare time wasn't spent bent over a keyboard profusely typing every thought that came to mind. Wasn't that what writers were supposed to do? I didn't fit the mold.

 

When I met with English faculty, my whole perspective changed. As they spoke about their own passions for writing, something clicked. The wheels began turning.

 

They asked me about my interests and, when I thought it was impossible, explained the ways in which I could incorporate my other passions into writing and how I could make a difference through my words. But more than that, they opened a door I had not been able to see before. As much as I hadn't wanted to admit it at the time, I knew I had found what I was meant to do.

 

I guess the moral of the story is, sometimes the things we are called to do are not necessarily the things we had originally had in mind. Waynesburg showed me that, and through the years, they have continued to foster a passion I had never known existed.

 

Looking back on that journey, I can't imagine the outcome any other way.


 

 


Hits: 787

Posted by on in Blog
20130130 105

I know what people will ask me when I return home.

 

“How was your internship?”

 

I can only assume that people do not expect or have the time to hear full details about my internship experience with Mary Kay Inc., so I'll keep it to just a sentence or two.

 

For the rest of you wanting to hear full(er) details, taking the time to read what I have to say, here it is:

 

My internship with Mary Kay was far more than my initial expectations. As an Interactive Design and Public Relations dual major, I had hoped to leave my internship with stronger design skills, several finished graphics and 10 to 12 writing pieces, but my expectations were not met.

 

Because of my unique internship opportunity to work with the eBusiness department (which works to launch new web applications in Mary Kay's global markets), I had to work much harder to seek the opportunities to design and write. I am very thankful for my supervisor, Erika, because she was gracious enough to help me find those design and writing opportunities.

 

My professors at Waynesburg have taught me to network and always introduce myself and shake hands with professionals whenever possible. I acted on that challenge and took it another step further by opening that hand shake opportunity to all the other summer interns through iLunch.

 

iLunch was not in my internship description nor did anyone ask me to create it. I learned to take advantage of opportunities (namely working in a 13-floor building full of seasoned professionals), and it was great to see iLunch be so successful in connecting the interns with the professionals.

 

Working with the people at Mary Kay also gave me invaluable experience in working in a team and relying on others to yield a great product. I learned the balance in accomplishing goals while also being friends and coworkers able to make jokes. I also learned about the necessity for caffeine and candy around 2 o'clock. One meeting I attended started off by passing around a box of peanut M&M's, Twix, Reese's and other Mars and Hershey products. (Perhaps I will try starting all my future meetings by passing out candy...)

 

In the end, I'm thankful my original expectations were not met. I was able to use my PR and design knowledge, just in different ways than I had expected, and I learned a lot about the heavy amount of work that goes into launching new web apps in Kazakhstan, Germany, Netherlands and Switzerland. (I also learned how to correctly spell “Kazakhstan.”) I was blessed with a great supervisor and coworkers, great opportunities and outstanding support for iLunch from both Mary Kay professionals and interns.

 

The greatest lesson I learned this summer was that my mom was right: you get out of it what you put into it. I could have been discouraged and resentful all summer because I was not working in Corporate Communications or Marketing utilizing my PR and design skills, but what would have been the benefit in a bad attitude? Had I chosen to play victim all summer instead of be a Mary Kay intern, I would have a missed so many other opportunities to learn.


Tagged in: kimber
Hits: 942

Posted by on in Blog
MaryKay

Before starting my internship with Mary Kay Inc., I saw this quote online from its founder Mary Kay Ash: “God first. Family second. Career third.”

I thought to myself, “Wow. That's a really good philosophy to have,” but I also thought how difficult it would be to live it.

As a senior in college, I would look at the prospectives of the full-time job and think I had to make a choice between a strong, advancing career or a faith laced into the fabric of my job. My faith is a very important part of who I am, but from what I've heard, the “real world” isn't too keen on God in the workplace. Sometimes, faith is even an impediment on advancing in a job. I thought that I would have to compromise on the blooming career, living out my faith through my job or both.

However, working with Mary Kay has given me a new perspective. Taking part in the culture of Mary Kay's workplace, I can now see how there does not have to be a compromise between faith and success in the workplace, even in a corporate setting.

The most eye-opening aspect of Mary Kay for me is how this group of people keeps their priorities in order while also being an extremely successful global company. I have seen people rearrange schedules to have time to take care of their kids who are sick at home and still work from home to achieve a full day's worth of work. There is a way to put God first, family second and career third and be a thriving organization, and Mary Kay proves that everyday.

Working with Mary Kay has been inspiring but also challenging in that I feel like I still lack that “real world” experience my professors talked about. I suppose I expected my “real world” experience to include an unfriendly boss and more arguments and cussing in the workplace. At Mary Kay, I had a very encouraging, affable supervisor and didn't witness any screaming arguments in a meeting.

Although my perspective of the “real world” work environment has been redefined, I am so thankful for my internship experience. Working with Mary Kay has shown me that it is very possible to achieve and maintain a respectful, friendly work environment and that the “real world” doesn't have to be super scary.

Walking toward the “real world” and applying for jobs is still intimidating to me, but I am thankful I can walk into that unknown realm knowing it is possible to keep my priorities in order while also being competitive and successful in my career as I have seen so many do at Mary Kay.


Tagged in: internship kimber
Hits: 463