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John 8:12: “When Jesus spoke again to the people, he said, ‘I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.’”

b2ap3_thumbnail_John-8-12.pngEvery time I walk outside in the evening and it is actually still light outside, I can’t help but be thankful. What a difference light makes! It is almost as good as the prophecy in Isaiah, “The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light!”

Tomorrow in chapel, we have the privilege of welcoming Johannes “Jannie” Swart, a professor World Mission and Evangelism at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. He is from South Africa and has lived through the darkest days of his home country. He has seen what a difference the light of Christ can make in the midst of the darkest hatred and broken relationships. And he has seen that light spread from his home country around the world to bring hope, peace and reconciliation in places where no human action could have accomplished. Only the Prince of Peace, who was willing to lay down his life for us, could bring that kind of light into this darkness.

What are the dark places in your life today? Are there places of doubt? Insecurity? Unforgiveness? Fear? Shame or Guilt? I pray that you would allow the light of Christ and the warmth of his love to fill your heart today and drive away all the darkness. And may the peace that passes all understanding guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blessings,

Rev Carolyn Poteet

 

cpoteet@waynesburg.edu

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When Ali Hulsey found out she’d be rooming with Susie Godwin prior to the girls’ freshman year at Waynesburg University, Ali figured they’d get along. What the Bakersfield, Cal., native didn’t realize is that she and Susie, of Buckhannon, W.Va., would room together all four years and become best friends in the process. Waynesburg has a way of doing that with total strangers, and below, Ali and Susie share just how it happened to them…

 

 

 

 



Ali Hulsey

Name

Susie Godwin

Senior

Class

Senior

Bakersfield, Cal.

Hometown

Buckhannon, W.Va.

The moment I stepped on campus I knew it was where I wanted to go. The people were all so friendly, and it instantly felt like home. The Education Department was great and had a lot of wonderful people working in it. Then to top it off the idea of living in the snow seemed intriguing.

Why WU?

I heard about WU from a friend who was, at the time, attending the university.  When I visited WU, I loved the campus and the friendly people. I also knew I wanted to play soccer, and Waynesburg seemed like a good fit!

Early Childhood Development and Special Education

Major

Secondary English Education

Waynesburg University Student Ambassador, Kappa Delta Pi (education honorary),
Council for Exceptional Children,
Resident Assistant,
Yellow Jackets sports fan!

Activities at WU

Women’s Soccer, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Kappa Delta Pi, Sigma Tau Delta (English honorary), DRUS (women’s honorary), Waynesburg University Student Ambassador

We really have no idea why we were paired; it was all random. I did not even fill out a roommate match sheet.  The only thing I requested was Burns Hall, which is where we were placed, but that is the only reason we can think of.

How did you become roommates?

I am from West Virginia and my roommate is from California. We were randomly assigned as roommates freshman year and have lived together ever since. I filled out a new student form and listed Elementary Education as a potential major, so that may have influenced how we became roommates.

We have done lots of traveling together, from road trips to UNC to visit her sister, flights to California to visit my family, a mission trip to Peru, and even spontaneous drives on the back roads of Waynesburg just exploring God’s beautiful creations on a nice day with the windows down and music up.

Best memory as roommates

My best memories as roommates would have to be all the soccer games and soccer related activities we experienced together. Ali was the team’s biggest fan, and I loved the memories we created throughout the soccer seasons.

Get to know him/her for who he/she is. Moving in, I hoped Susie and I would have a good relationship and such, but I never expected her to be my best friend. As I got to know her she quickly became my best friend and someone I could truly see myself living with for the rest of my college career.

Tips for incoming freshmen
who will be roommates

I would advise to be considerate and willing to share space. I would also encourage roommates to spend time together and get to know each other, as well. Getting to know a new roommate in college can be so rewarding and can lead to a lifelong friendship. Make the most out of your college experience!

COFFEE! And a lot more coffee… here in South 312 coffee is a daily staple not just for us but for all our friends, “The South Hall Family,” who often stop in and help themselves to our coffee.

Top item(s) necessary for living in the residence halls

My roommate and I love coffee, so that is a must!

Absolutely. I couldn’t imagine my college career with any other roommate, and truthfully I don’t even want to try to image that. The memories we have had and the relationship we have developed over the last four years is a greater blessing than words can ever describe. My roommate is a part of my life that I could never change.

If you had to do it all over again, would you still live together? Why?

I would do it all over again in a heartbeat! Ali and I came to college as strangers, and after four years as roommates, I am leaving college with a best friend and memories I will cherish for a lifetime.


When asked if they had anything else to add, both Alie and Susie commented on the family-like sense of community in the residence halls. They encourage all incoming students to get to know the other residents in their hall, as they can become best friends who share unforgettable memories for four years at Waynesburg and beyond.

Upon graduation, both Ali and Susie plan to pursue their master's degree in education, and they hope to stick around Waynesburg to do so. What will come of their living situation as a result? Not surprisingly, they already have an apartment lined up together in the area. They figure, after four successful years in the residence halls, they want to see what a fifth year as roommates has in store!

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Joshua 1:9  - “Be strong and courageous. Do not be frightened, and do not be dismayed, for the Lord your God is with you wherever you go.”

As Moses handed the reins of Israel over to Joshua, the Lord told Joshua, “Be strong and courageous.” Joshua was a well-seasoned warrior by then and he had trained well under Moses’ leadership, but he still had many battles before him as he led his people into the promised land.

This week we will all celebrate President Lee being officially inaugurated into the office which he has been serving for most of this year. To him I say, “Be strong andb2ap3_thumbnail_josh1.png courageous.” And to all of you also I say, “Be strong and courageous.” You may be a seasoned warrior or you may be brand new in the wider world, but the advice is the same. Do not be afraid, for the Lord goes with you.

In Martin Luther’s hymn, “A Mighty Fortress,” he writes, “Did we in our own strength confide, our striving would be losing.” You see, when I say be strong, I don’t want you to rest on your own strength. Your own strength will waver and it will run out – for some it will run out slower than others, but it is nonetheless finite. But God told the Apostle Paul, “My grace is sufficient for you, for My strength is made perfect in weakness.” Our strength does not come from inside us. Our strength comes from above us. It comes from the Lord. Paul writes, “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.”

 Be strong, brothers and sisters, be strong in the strength of the Lord. Trust in him and he will direct your paths.

 

Blessings to you, President Lee, and to all of you,

Rev. Carolyn Poteet

cpoteet@waynesburg.edu

 

 

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As an Admissions Counselor at Waynesburg University who’s also an alumnus, I have the privilege of sharing my experience daily with prospective students and families. One of the most often asked questions is a simple one: “What’s your favorite part about Waynesburg?”

Easy.

It’s the people.

I know, I know…cliché, right? But my parents always taught me not to lie, and if I responded with any other answer, I’d be lying. So many just good, quality people who truly embody the mission of the University walk the campus each day, and that was my favorite part about being a student and remains my favorite part as a staff member.

When I talk about my student experience, I always point to how much the faculty and staff truly care about the holistic development of each student and how much they pour into the students’ lives. Students can gain so much insight from watching faculty and staff members live their lives each day, but yesterday, for this staff member, the roles were reversed as the actions of a group of students showed me what it truly means to be a part of the Waynesburg University community.

On my way home from the Admissions Office last evening, I saw a little boy, maybe four or five years old, running on a sidewalk just off campus. At first, I didn’t think much of it. Spring had just begun a few hours earlier (although it didn’t much feel like it), and the kid just wanted to be outside. Heck, I was planning to strap on the running shoes, myself, as soon as I got home.

Then, as I was almost past the boy, I noticed his feet—shoeless. All he had on was a pair of white socks. I drove a bit further and realized there were no adults or older siblings around, either. It was then that my eyes shot down to my driver’s side mirror. In the reflection, I could see the boy attempting to flag down the next two cars that passed by. Neither stopped. At that point, I immediately proceeded to the intersection straight ahead and navigated a U-turn.

I pulled up next to the boy, rolled down my window and asked if everything was OK. It became apparent right away from the boy’s reaction that everything was not “OK.” Through tears, he forced out that his mother wasn’t home, he didn’t know where she was and he didn’t know where to go. When asked if he knew exactly where home was, he could only point in a general direction.

As I decided upon a course of action, another car pulled alongside me and asked the same question I had posed to the boy: “Is everything OK?” I explained the situation, and immediately that car, along with a third vehicle, pulled off to the side of the road in front of me. Out jumped a group of four Waynesburg University students, two guys and two girls. The girls made a beeline straight for the little boy, putting their arms around him and wrapping him in an extra sweatshirt. (In my own ignorance, I had nearly failed to realize that the boy was donning just a t-shirt in temperatures that had been dropping throughout the day.)

Moments later, we made the call to University Security, who relayed our message onto the Borough Police. Within minutes, a police officer arrived to provide assistance, followed closely by two University Security personnel.

The group of students, however, did not seem to want to depart. They hovered around the scene, wanting to ensure that the boy was returned to where he needed to be. Only after I explained that University Security had assured me they needed no further assistance from us did the group of students find it permissible to leave.

As I made the short trek home, I couldn’t help but be proud of how the group of students reacted to the situation. And I couldn’t help but draw the parallel to Jesus’s parable of the Good Samaritan in the 10th chapter of Luke. Just like the priest and Levite passed by the robbed, beaten man in Biblical times, so too did two cars pass by the lost little boy, even as he was pleading for their assistance with the waving of his arms. If I hadn’t realized my initial mistake and turned around, however, I have absolutely no doubts that the group of students would have come to the aid of that little boy, much like the Good Samaritan thousands of years earlier.

How blessed, I thought, I am to work at a University where the students possess such strong morals and Godly character.

What’s my favorite part about Waynesburg?

Easy.

It’s the people.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_P10405671.jpgThis week I did something I've never done before, something that I, and I'm sure many people out there, have wanted to do, even if just to cross it off their bucket list: I climbed a mountain. Not just any mountain, either, but Slieve Donard, the highest mountain not only in Northern Ireland's Mourne Mountain range, but in the country all together. I wasn't originally going to; my friends and I just wanted to go into the Mournes, because they're pretty and I know songs about them. The woman at the visitor center pointed it out, though, and informed us of its status, and we thought, "why not?" 

Well, there are a good many reasons "why not." It's exhausting and takes forever, and just when you think you're almost there, you round a bend and see a whole other portion you couldn't before, and you can almost hear the stupid mountain mocking your pain. Then you get to the top and have to hang on tight because you feel like you're going to be blown clear off the other side. I don't know if I'd ever had quite so clear a demonstration of the "fear of God," before, but the peak of that mountain painted a pretty spectacular analogy for me. By the time I was done I was spent. I had blisters, my feet were no longer positive they knew how to function properly, my legs felt like jelly and I was starving. 

And it was incredible. 

I think anyone who has ever done something like this can liken it to a life lesson or something philosophical. There are certainly enough songs out there to prove it (ex. "Climb Every Mountain," "The Climb," etc.). Most people have "mountains" in their lives and it's nice to hear songs that encourage you through them.  However, actually pounding the pavement, so to speak, definitely gives you a fresh perspective, (as well as a good deal more respect for the characters in Lord of the Rings). 

Standing on the top of Slieve Donard, I felt a lot of things. I wasn't kidding when I said I was afraid I was going to be blown away, because I was legitimately terrified; the wind was quite literally pushing me around. At one point it actually knocked me over. I wasn't kidding about the "fear of God" comment either. As petrified as I was of it, I was in complete awe of the gusts' power, and really, genuinely grateful for it the last few feet up the slope, because I wasn't positive I'd make it if not for that push.

 I also felt wonder; I don't think you can look down at the world from that high and not experience a sense of wonder. This earth is truly a beautiful creation, and this island is a chilly little paradise as far as I'm concerned. One of the biggest things I felt, though, was a crazy sense of “Wow." Wow, look at this; wow, I'm on top of a mountain; wow, wow, wow, I did it, I made it. On top of all of that, too, I knew I couldn't have done it without a little help; I kept sending silent wee prayers up periodically, and I couldn't help but send up one of thanks when that strong wind forced me up that last stretch. I hate to sound cliché, but it felt like one of those life lessons to me. I didn't think I could make it, and with His help, I did. I think that says a lot. 

So yes, it was hard; yes, it was grueling; yes, I was genuinely afraid I was going to die. There were points I wanted to stop and go no further, but I am forever going to be grateful that I kept going. Because, at the end of it all, it was amazing, and so, so worth the trouble. 

 

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