Stover scholars learn valuable lessions from the nation's leaders

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Waynesburg University's Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership develops leaders to positively impact America's political and social institutions. The Stover Scholars traveled to Washington, D.C. in November 2012 and met six leaders who have had an impact on American society.

 

Former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, former U.S. Attorney General and Pennsylvania Governor Richard L. Thornburgh, Roman Catholic Cardinal Donald Wuerl, Supreme Court litigators Michael Carvin and Gregory Katsas, and economist Richard Rahn provided insights about leadership, law, economics and ethics to the scholars.

 

Commenting on the D.C. trip, Stover Scholar J.R. Kautz said, "I can honestly say this trip has been one of the most influential and notable experiences of my life. I am proud to be a Stover Scholar."

 

During their meeting with former U.S. Justice Department Officials Gregory Katsas and Michael Carvin at the Washington, D.C. office of the Jones Day Law Firm, the largest law firm in the world, both attorneys described their experience and strategy litigating the National Federation of Independent Business's constitutional challenge to Obamacare.

 

The group then visited Cardinal Donald Wuerl at St. Matthew's Cathedral, where Wuerl expressed hope that the Stover Scholars would be leaders of change in the future and urged them to stay connected to America's traditional values and moral foundations.

 

Later, the Scholars met retired Justice Sandra Day O'Connor at the U.S. Supreme Court. Justice O'Connor told the Stover Scholars that she "worked hard to set a good precedent as the first woman Justice, not a bad one."

 

The Stover Scholars then visited former Chamber of Commerce economist Dr. Richard Rahn, Chairman of the Institute for Global Economic Growth, at the Cato Institute, where he listed the requirements for a prosperous economy.

 

At the National Archives, the Stover Scholars viewed the original Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights.

 

The Stover Scholars ended their D.C. trip by meeting former U.S. Attorney General and Pennsylvania Governor Dick Thornburgh at the Metropolitan Club. Thornburgh's remarks about ethics and law drew upon Micah 6:8: "do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with your God."