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b2ap3_thumbnail_Bibles-for-Christian-University-blog-edited.jpgAs the college search continues for many high school students, the question of whether to attend a secular or Christian institution may come to the forefront of the discussion. This can be a difficult topic, as students try to discern where God is leading them in the midst of such transition and change. While individuals searching for their true calling and direction in life can certainly follow God’s will at secular schools, there are advantages to attending a Christian college or university. Here are the top three…

3. Academic instruction.  In many cases, choosing a Christian institution means choosing a smaller setting. According to collegestats.org, 817 of the country’s religiously affiliated schools have less than 5,000 students. And nearly 400 of those have less than 1,000. So what’s that mean for your academics? It means smaller class sizes, more hands-on learning opportunities and much more individualized attention from faculty. Also, often times, those professors will share the Christian perspective on the subject matters they teach (after laying out all of the other viewpoints, as well), allowing students to explore and discover in an informed manner.

2. Service opportunities.  Matthew 20:28 reads, “…the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve…”  Thus, it’s no surprise that the types of institutions that bear Christ’s name provide boundless opportunities for their students to serve the world around them. Whether it’s traveling halfway across the globe to work with impoverished youth or giving back locally with the vocational skills learned in the classroom and laboratory, these experiences prove life altering for so many. And the best schools will seek not only to provide these outlets at their respective institutions, but also to equip their students for a lifetime of servitude for the glory of God.

1. Students’ holistic development.  To many (including myself!), the No. 1 reason to consider a Christian college or university is the opportunity to develop holistically as a person. From top to bottom, the faculty and staff at these institutions care about so much more than just what letter goes down in the grade book. They pour their heart, soul and precious time into students to ensure that they’re not only better job prospects, but that they’re also better men and women of God. And at a time when fiscal responsibility is on the top of everyone’s priority list, that type of college experience is a value that’s worth every single penny.

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With Thanksgiving just a day away, the busy fall travel season is all wrapped up for many admissions professionals across the country. No more rushing from high school to high school, no more standing behind a college fair table and no more late afternoons on Panera’s wi-fi—at least until early Spring.

 

Now in my third year as an admissions representative at Waynesburg University, I have the hustle and bustle of three of those travel seasons under my belt. And while there’s many more seasoned than I, I certainly had the pleasure of experiencing a great deal over the course of those three autumns.

 

From wings in Buffalo and cheesesteaks in Philly, to crème pie in Boston and BBQ in Texas, I always tried to sample the local cuisine. When I found myself with a brief bit of downtime, I even attempted to hit a few of the sites, Fenway Park and Maine’s rocky coast included.

 

Despite the personal perks, though, I speak on behalf of the entire Admissions staff here when I say our favorite part is simply interacting with all of the individuals we meet over the course of the fall, from the typical sit-down in a high school guidance office to a chance encounter like the one I had in Dallas with a man born in Waynesburg’s hospital 60-70 years prior. The interest in and connections to our small university in Southwestern Pennsylvania never cease to excite me.

 

In October, I happened to be in northern New Jersey during Waynesburg’s Fall Break. Two current students who I had met in the area in years prior stopped by my table at two separate events to say hello. They recalled and reminisced about their own college search, which seemed like such a short time prior. It’s those conversations that make the fall travel season such an enjoyable experience, and it’s those relationships that can make a job in admissions so rewarding.

 

So on this, the eve of Thanksgiving, we in the Admissions Office want to pause and reflect on what we’re thankful for—for safe travels, quality conversations, and delightful students and families we have the pleasure of working with, day in and day out.

 

Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at Waynesburg University. "Let us come before him with thanksgiving..." -Psalm 95:2a

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Tinnemeyer-and-students-Chapel-steps.jpgWith so many colleges and universities out there to choose from, it can be difficult to decide where all to apply. After filling out a few, you may look at the next school on your list and think to yourself, “Why should I apply here?” Well, if you’re asking that about Waynesburg University, this list is your answer! Here are the top five reasons to apply to Waynesburg:

 

5. It’s free!  Not much to explain here. If you apply online, it won’t cost you a penny!

4. Fun.  We understand you need some downtime in order to be successful academically. Whether you’re off to practice, enjoying Bingo night, taking a trip to Pittsburgh or just hanging with friends in the residence halls, you’ll never be at a loss for things to do. Oh, and traditions that students enjoy? We’ve got a bunch of those, too. Pumpkin Bowling, the Campus Community Thanksgiving Dinner, and the President’s Breakfast are but a few.

3. Achievement Awards.  Depending on where you’re at with your cumulative high school GPA and SAT/ACT scores, you could be in line for anywhere from $28,000 to $60,000 (four-year totals) in Achievement Awards. If you apply and are accepted, you’ll find out right on your acceptance letter how much, if any, you may qualify for. This, along with other Financial Aid, could help defray the total cost of attending Waynesburg, which is already almost $11,000 less than other private, four-year institutions!

2. Hands-on learning.  Hands-on learning is a staple here, and in almost every major, that starts freshman year. Whether you’re assessing injuries on the football field, analyzing blood spatter in the Forensic Science Lab or broadcasting events from the University’s remote TV truck, you won’t just be sitting in a classroom. When you are, though, it’ll only be with about 19 others. As a result, your professors will know you and invest themselves in your learning.

1. People.  Cliché? Maybe. But to so many here, the best part of Waynesburg truly is its people. Those faculty members we just mentioned, President Lee, Residence Life, Campus Ministry Assistants, coaches, and the list could go on – all here committed to our mission of Christian faith, scholarship and service, and to your holistic development as a person.

 

As you can see, no matter what your criteria, Waynesburg has something for you. Don’t wait; apply today! (Remember, it’s free!)

 

Plus, if you apply and are accepted within the next few weeks, you may also be eligible to apply for some of our Competitive Merit Scholarship Programs. You don’t want to miss out on that opportunity!

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Sherman-Colorito-for-small-liberal-arts-top-5.pngBig school, or small school? That’s the question a lot of individuals face when choosing a college. And in the long list of factors that goes into choosing a college, size and type often find themselves placed near the top in terms of importance. To help with this critical question in the college search process, here are the top five reasons to consider a small, liberal arts college or university…

5. Community.  It’s rare to walk anywhere on a smaller campus and not see someone you know. Sheer numbers play a major role in that, but so does the fact that everyone on campus seems to be involved in something. If you play a sport, host a show on the school radio station, perform in the musical and work in the bookstore, you might be a student at one of these schools. Seems like a busy life, but the camaraderie is hard to beat at larger institutions.
4. Scholarships and financial aid.  Sure, big, public universities may have a cheaper sticker price, but when it comes to the bottom line, small schools often surprise prospective students with their affordability. The combination of scholarships and need-based institutional aid, which typically isn’t available at larger colleges, makes this possible.
3. Small classes taught by professors.  Because graduate and doctoral programs are not as prevalent at smaller liberal arts schools, often times, graduate students and teaching assistants don’t exist, and if they do, they’re not in front of the classroom. Faculty members are the ones teaching the undergraduate students, and it’s almost always in a smaller setting. No 300-seat auditoriums here; you’ll know your classmates and be able to interact with them in a more intimate classroom environment.
2. Grad schools and employers value it.  As Lynn O’Shaughnessy put it in her 2010 article on cbsnews.com, “liberal arts colleges…teach kids how to think, talk and write,” and, while simple, that’s exactly what employers are looking for. Furthermore, according to O’Shaughnessy’s article, “liberal arts schools dominate the list of the top 10 institutions that produce the most students who ultimately earn doctorates.” Why is this? Graduate schools are looking for just the type of research opportunities students have at liberal arts colleges.
1. You know your professors, and they know you.  While learning from professors in small classes is great, an even bigger benefit is getting to know your professors on a personal level and gaining hands-on experience right alongside them. The connections you make with those individuals become invaluable as you search for graduate schools and/or employment. They’ve all been out there in the field doing the work themselves, and now they’re helping little ole you do the same.

 

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Art at Waynesburg University - A Christian College in Pa

Big school, or small school? That's the question a lot of individuals face when choosing a college. And in the laundry list of factors that goes into choosing a college, size and type are often at the top in terms of importance. Here are the top five reasons to consider a small, liberal arts college or university…

 

5. Community. It's a rarity to walk anywhere on a smaller campus and not see someone you know. Sheer numbers are a big part of that, but so is the fact that everyone on campus seems to be involved in something. If you play a sport, write for the school newspaper, sing in the choir and work in the dining hall, you might be a student at one of these schools. Seems like a busy life, but the camaraderie is hard to beat at larger institutions.

 

4. Scholarships and financial aid. Sure, big, public universities may have a cheaper sticker price, but when it comes to the bottom line, small schools often surprise prospective students with their affordability. The combination of scholarships and need-based institutional aid, which typically isn't available at larger colleges, makes this possible.

 

3. Small classes taught by professors. Because graduate and doctoral programs are not as prevalent at smaller liberal arts schools, often times, graduate students and teaching assistants don't exist, and if they do, they're not in front of the classroom. Full-time faculty members are the ones teaching the undergraduate students, and it's almost always in a smaller setting. No 300-seat auditoriums here; you'll know your classmates and be able to interact with them in a more intimate classroom environment.

 

2. Grad schools and employers value it. As Lynn O'Shaughnessy put it in her 2010 article on cbsnews.com, “liberal arts colleges…teach kids how to think, talk and write,” and, while simple, that's exactly what employers are looking for. Furthermore, according to O'Shaughnessy's article, “liberal arts schools dominate the list of the top 10 institutions that produce the most students who ultimately earn doctorates.” Why is this? Graduate schools are looking for just the type of research opportunities students have at liberal arts colleges.

 

1. You know your professors, and they know you. While learning from professors in small classes is great, an even bigger benefit is actually getting to know your professors on a personal level and gaining hands-on experience right alongside them. The connections you make with those individuals become invaluable as you search for graduate schools and/or employment. They've all been out there in the field doing the work themselves, and now they're helping little ole you do the same.

 

Dave Floyd is an Admissions Counselor at Waynesburg University, whose travel territory includes Westmoreland County, Eastern Pennsylvania and the Northeast states. He is also a 2012 Waynesburg alumnus.


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