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Posted by on in Internships

For Heidi Dains, the choice to attend Waynesburg University did not happen at the most advantageous time, but fortunately for Dains, the choice has proven to be the right one.  Dains transferred to Waynesburg University a year after beginning her undergraduate education, and despite the challenges associated with transitioning to a new school, she has never looked back.

“My Waynesburg experience has opened my eyes to what an education can and should be. I’m very thankful to have made the transition to Waynesburg and I think that it was a very smart move in terms of getting the most out of my higher education.”

This summer, Heidi Dains, a junior business management major at Waynesburg University, is spending her time as an intern in the Customer Relations department of Mylan Pharmaceuticals.

On a typical day at Mylan, Dains handles calls from distributors and wholesalers regarding shipments, as well as interacting with other related departments.  This internship has allowed her to gain everyday experience through observation of and participation in transactions, deals and the process of communication internally and via outside parties.  In addition, Dains has had the opportunity to shadow people in both her department and neighboring departments, so as to gain a better understanding of what their jobs entail.  

Dains believes that her Waynesburg education has helped to prepare her by teaching her the importance of hard work and dedication.

“You need to be able to voice your opinion and have the courage and knowledge to successfully make moves in the right direction and you’ll get to where you want to be,” said Dains.  “The classes that I’ve taken at Waynesburg have proven helpful during my internship because we are taught real-life skills and all completely relative material.”

In addition, Dains has found the supportive atmosphere of the Waynesburg community to be beneficial in helping her to grow as an individual.

“Waynesburg is different because you build strong relationships with your professors, and those who have more experience are always willing to help you no matter what,” she said.  “You’re not just another student, because someone is always looking out for you and your best interest.”

For Dains, Neely Lantz, instructor of business administration, has proven to be one of those people. In addition, Dains credits Lantz for helping her to set up her internship opportunity and for being someone she could count on for advice and resources.

Upon her graduation from Waynesburg University, Dains plans to attend graduate school, with the ultimate goal of starting her own business or making a career out of something she loves.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_intern.JPGThaddeus Statler, a senior Waynesburg University business management major interning with Aflac, was recently named the winner of the company’s nationwide 2015 Elevate! Intern contest.

The Elevate! Intern contest, which ran from February 9 to May 8, was a contest for all interns associated with Aflac. It measured total accounts opened as well as the overall production of interns.  

The Mount Morris, Pennsylvania, native sold the most policies of all Aflac interns and opened three new accounts during the contest time frame. 

“Waynesburg University prepared me for this opportunity,” said Statler. “I have taken a few classes that I was able to apply towards understanding people and the product I was offering, as well as the presentation of that product. Being comfortable with people was my most valuable resource, which the climate at Waynesburg has definitely influenced.”

Statler also acknowledges his relationship with his business professors in his successes.

“I am most specifically thankful to Professor [Neely] Lantz and Professor [Christian] Ola, as they helped educate me on topics I would be using at my internship,” said Statler. “Their openness and willingness to talk on their own time, give me personal advice and even share their own experiences with me was more than I could have asked.”

For his accomplishment, Statler will receive a $5,000 scholarship and a trip to Columbus, Georgia, to visit Aflac headquarters.

# # #

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Joshuah Dains, senior business management major

North America accounting/finance intern at Mylan, Inc., in Morgantown, W. Va.

When Joshuah Dains was searching for internship opportunities last winter, he was not only looking for an organization that had a great global reputation, but also a place where he could make a difference in people’s lives. Dains was able to accomplish this at Mylan, Inc., in Morgantown, W. Va.

As an accounting/finance intern, he worked with the Existing Product Forecasting Department. Throughout his internship, Dains met with various departments within the organization to collect data, created reports to send to end users and performed the economic forecast for the coming quarter. 

In addition, Dains and another intern were given the responsibility to work with a Mylan product and improve its performance in the public’s eye. 

“The finance team assigned us a product to research, analyze data and make a recommendation on what we would do with this product in the future to increase sales,” said Dains. “This project gave me the ability to reach out to different departments and really get an in-depth look at what it takes to sell a successful pharmaceutical product.” 

Through his internship at Mylan, the current president of Waynesburg’s Student Senate learned how to incorporate his faith into his work in the corporate setting. Dains is now confident in expressing his faith in any situation.

“Before my internship began, I researched the attributes of a Christian businessman to figure out what it would take to carry my faith into the professional work place,” said Dains. “Now that my internship experience is completed, I can approach any work with earnest, knowing that the decisions I make at work further enhance my personal faith and what I have learned in classes.” 

 

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Posted by on in News

RJ_20141105-144921_1.jpgIn support of RJ Tonks, a senior sports management major and marketing minor at Waynesburg University, business students held Rise Up for RJ Saturday, Nov. 1, during half time of the football game. President Douglas G. Lee, as well as members of the Waynesburg University Business Club, presented Tonks with a check for $8,000 at the game.

After the check was created, donations continued to pour in, totaling $8,322 at last count for Tonks’ treatments at the Carrick Brain Centers in Marietta, Ga. This far surpassed the club’s original goal of $6,000.

Ashley Clark, a senior marketing major and accounting minor from McDonald, Pa.; Joshua Dains, a senior business management major from Clarksville, Pa.; and Kaitlyn Marteney, a senior forensic accounting and criminal justice major from Berlin, Pa., spearheaded the fundraiser to help Tonks defray the costs of treatment.

The students integrated service with learning by using skills gained in their business classes.

“We designed, ordered, sold and distributed the shirts, as well as everything in between,” said Dains. “Our professors were great people to bounce ideas off of, and they proved to be an awesome support system.”

The funds raised will go toward treatment and travel costs for Tonks. When he was eight, Tonks developed a virus that left a scar on his brain. For many years, the scar impaired Tonks’ hand eye coordination, mobility, speech, balance and fine motor skills. As a freshman, Tonks became dependent on a wheelchair for mobility.

“We are all really good friends with RJ,” said Clark. “We had heard that he may not be able to go down for treatment this semester because it is very expensive. We know that RJ's goal is to walk unassisted at graduation this May, and we understand how important that is to him.”

The senior Business Club majors designed a shirt to sell to staff, faculty, students and community members. The front of the shirt read "Rise Up for RJ," while the back contains Tonks’ personal motto, the Bible verse Jeremiah 29:11. 

In total, the club sold more than 600 shirts during the six-week fundraiser.

“It's an incredible feeling to know I have support from the entire Waynesburg University community,” said Tonks. “I was amazed at how much money was raised from the sale of the shirts. I am so thankful for my classmates in the Business Club that organized the fundraiser and everyone that bought or sold a shirt.”

The students held a “black out” at the November 1 Waynesburg versus Thomas Moore football game to sell shirts as the final fundraising push. Members of the crowd purchased and wore the black shirts in a show of support.

“We have all been greatly impacted by RJ's enthusiasm, motivation and humbling personality; we wanted to do something special for him.” Clark said. “His treatment costs $5,500 for one week. This amount does not include travel expenses like food, lodging, gas, etc. We are so happy to have surpassed our goal.”

For more information, contact cla7773@student.waynesburg.edu.

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The Pittsburgh Project's purpose to develop servant leaders and uphold the dignity of vulnerable homeowners has much in common with Waynesburg University's mission of educating students through faith, learning and serving.

For several years, Waynesburg University has worked to build a partnership with The Pittsburgh Project, a nonprofit community development organization committed to meeting the needs of the Pittsburgh community. Each semester, Waynesburg students are given the opportunity to serve extensively with The Project in programs such as tutoring, work camps and community garden.

“The Pittsburgh Project is striving to provide for its community through education and home improvements for the elderly, widows and those with disabilities who fall 150 percent below the poverty level,” said Sarah Brandstetter, coordinator of Waynesburg University's Bonner Scholar Program.

This year, five Waynesburg students and a recent alumnus are dedicating their summers to the cause, serving as worksite liaisons from the beginning of June to mid-August.

Those working with The Project include: Kimber Blair, a junior interactive design major from New Castle, Pa; Darartu Boyer, a senior early childhood education major from Columbia, Pa; Ethan Hacker, a junior biblical ministry studies (children and youth) major from Butler, Pa; Blake McCarty, a sophomore business management major from Frisco, Tx; Esteban Saldi a 2012 human services alumnus from La Paz, Bolivia and Steven Snow, a sophomore criminal justice administration major from Butler, Pa.

“I decided to serve at the Pittsburgh Project this summer so that I could minister to people in my home city,” Hacker said. “I like working hands on and doing labor. I am excited to work with the homeowners and other groups to make the city a little bit better every day.”

Dave Calvario, Director of the Center for Service Leadership, and Brandstetter have worked alongside students within The Project throughout the years and regularly encourage students to take the next step when it comes to serving others.

“Sarah Brandstetter and Dave Calvario have always been supportive and influential in my life, and they are the ones who helped me decide to work with The Project my first summer,” Blair said.

Proud to be part of an organization that has genuine interest in the people of Pittsburgh, Blair reflected on how God has opened her eyes to the need in the area.

“There's a need to care for vulnerable, sometimes neglected, homeowners who are unable to continue the upkeep on their own homes,” she said. “There is a need for positive influences in the lives of the youth. There is a need for reconciliation between gangs and other groups.”

With all of the need in the Pittsburgh area, and around the world, there is an even bigger need for individuals like these Waynesburg students and alumnus who have given their summers in order to serve God and make a difference for those around them.


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