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Dr. Mark Ahlseen was named associate professor of business administration in the fall of 2014. He received his B.S. degree from Taylor University and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Texas A&M University.

Scott Byrd, senior accounting major, was voted as the Boris Ivezic scholarship award winner in economics for the 2014- 2015 academic year.

Joshua Chicarelli, assistant professor of business administration, Dr. Christian Ola, chairperson for the business administration department and assistant professor of business administration, and Neely Lantz, instructor of business administration, served as moderators for the Christian Business Faculty Association (CBFA) annual conference in Nashville, Tenn., in October 2014. Chicarelli also presented at the AAA (American Accounting Association) Feb. 27- 28, 2015. 

Dr. Ola’s paper, “Stock Market Response to CEO Changes: Does Gender Matter?” was accepted for publication in the 2015 edition of International Journal of Business and Management.

 

Tagged in: business news
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b2ap3_thumbnail_intern.JPGThaddeus Statler, a senior Waynesburg University business management major interning with Aflac, was recently named the winner of the company’s nationwide 2015 Elevate! Intern contest.

The Elevate! Intern contest, which ran from February 9 to May 8, was a contest for all interns associated with Aflac. It measured total accounts opened as well as the overall production of interns.  

The Mount Morris, Pennsylvania, native sold the most policies of all Aflac interns and opened three new accounts during the contest time frame. 

“Waynesburg University prepared me for this opportunity,” said Statler. “I have taken a few classes that I was able to apply towards understanding people and the product I was offering, as well as the presentation of that product. Being comfortable with people was my most valuable resource, which the climate at Waynesburg has definitely influenced.”

Statler also acknowledges his relationship with his business professors in his successes.

“I am most specifically thankful to Professor [Neely] Lantz and Professor [Christian] Ola, as they helped educate me on topics I would be using at my internship,” said Statler. “Their openness and willingness to talk on their own time, give me personal advice and even share their own experiences with me was more than I could have asked.”

For his accomplishment, Statler will receive a $5,000 scholarship and a trip to Columbus, Georgia, to visit Aflac headquarters.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Posted by on in Alumni

b2ap3_thumbnail_Josh-Dains_20150617-173735_1.jpgJoshua Dains, a 2015 business management alumnus, is employed as a financial analyst at Mylan Pharmaceuticals in Morgantown, West Virginia.

As a company that is focused on providing the world’s 7 billion people with access to high-quality medicine, Dains said he is blessed to daily witness the passion of a group of people running a business that saves lives and provides jobs.

“It doesn’t get much better than that,” he said. “I am able to use my education and apply it to my role as a financial analyst, knowing full well that the work I am doing is helping people across the globe.”

Dains responsibilities include running through a variety of scenarios and figuring out which propositions make the most business sense for the company, as well as analyzing historical data.

Although a large portion of his current success has come from lessons learned in the classroom, Dains said his undergraduate career was much more comprehensive.

“I feel as though my time prepared me very holistically,” he said. “I was able to receive a great education, but I also feel like my time at [Waynesburg University] was made exceptional by being able to be involved in a multitude of organizations.”

Dains said his involvement allowed him to develop people skills and learn how to work with individuals with conflicting views.

“I am able to rely on those past experiences. Whether at school or the workplace, people are everywhere. I feel like Waynesburg taught me how to handle all of these interactions and thrive in all environments,” he said.

Additionally, Dains participated in eight service trips during his time at Waynesburg University, adding even more dimension to his undergraduate experience. Teamwork, communication skills and growth in his faith are among the additional life lessons that Dains said he knows he will carry with him into the future.

“I now feel as though I can walk comfortably in my faith wherever I go, and much of that feeling can be credited to these trips,” he said.

Also contributing to Dains’ holistic experience is the value that Waynesburg University places on proficient and student-centered faculty members. Dains specifically credits Dr. Gordon McClung, professor of marketing, for challenging him throughout his journey.

“He is able to connect with students in the classroom, posing questions that he knew we would soon face in the real world,” Dains said. “He also tested us out of the classroom, going the extra mile to help us with career advice and allowing us to learn from his experiences in the professional world.”

Although Dains holds a lengthy list of lessons and skills he’s gained from his undergraduate experience, he places more value on the one that has taken him some time to grasp.

“I feel that because of Waynesburg University, I have developed the passion for leading and helping others. Going into college, I did a decent amount of volunteer work, but I never really understood the full picture. I didn’t realize exactly why I was doing it, other than it sounded like the right thing to do, until I got to Waynesburg. I can now tie it in with my faith knowing that I can serve in an office setting just as much as at an orphanage,” he said. “Service to people is needed everywhere, and that is the biggest thing I’ve taken away from Waynesburg University.”

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b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_1538.jpgMeet Jerry Lawman, a junior international business major at Waynesburg University. This semester, he will be interning at Bosch in Germany and will share his experiences right here on the Waynesburg blog. 

I am a junior International Business major here at Waynesburg and I am currently interning in the Controlling Department for Bosch in Ludwigsburg, Germany. I knew from the beginning that this international internship was going to be a huge step out of my comfort zone, especially because I’ve never traveled outside of the U.S. 

It was my first flight overseas and I arrived in Stuttgart, Germany on January 28 with no plans on where to stay until I moved into my apartment February 1. I figured it would be a fun experience to figure everything out when I got there, and it was! I met so many helpful people. 

My first step was to get a German SIM card for my phone. From there, two men helped me book a hostel and helped me carry my luggage all the way there. I was shocked by how helpful they were. They said they have a saying in China, “If you are going to help someone, you help them all the way through.” 

After my jet lag wore off the next day, I started to explore the city of Stuttgart. It is one of the biggest cities I have ever been to. This is also the first time I have ever used public transportation, so the trains and buses took me a couple days to figure how everything worked. My stay at the hostel was a great experience, however. I met people from all over the world like Argentina, Jordan, Australia, India, Turkey and Germany as well. Many of them are now my friends on Facebook and we will probably stay in touch. 

I met many other people on the streets while exploring; because I was lost, people would help me get to where I needed to go and some of these people I am now friends with. It is just crazy how many people you meet when you go to a different country like this.  

I finally moved in to my apartment the day before I started work and my landlord was very helpful to me and helped me find out how to register at the town hall and even let me use some extra bedding because I could not pack my own bedding. It is a furnished six person shared apartment, however, and there will be all interns living here who will work for Porsche and Komet. 

They helped me find out my route for my first day of work and other things that would have been hard to do by myself. It takes me about 40 minutes to get to work and I arrive about 20 to 30 minutes early every day. I made sure to make a good first impression by wearing a suit my first day and wearing a nice shirt and tie every day after. 

I was introduced to everyone in the controlling department where I will work, and everyone speaks at least a little English so I can communicate with everyone. The first few days I started to learn some of my tasks and what I will be doing. A lot of my work will involve Excel, but the first few days I had to learn Excel in German so it was very difficult at first. 

I am trying to learn as much as I can from the two other interns, as they will be done with their internships in a couple weeks - then I will be the only intern in this department. Our main tasks include resources controlling, business planning, monthly business reporting and other controlling related activities. 

In my first week of work, I tried to show my willingness to learn and perform, as well as show them how I can be proactive and a strong team player. Being the only American in my department at Bosch is definitely a great experience to learn about cultures different from my own. 

About Bosch: Bosch home appliances is part of BSH, BSH Home Appliances Group, based in Munich, Germany. As part of the third largest appliance manufacturer in the world, Bosch has been selling high performance German-engineered major home appliances and cooking appliances in the United States since 1991. Known nationwide for raising the standards in appliance quietness, efficiency and integrated design, Bosch frequently receives top ratings in leading consumer publications and is the winner of the 2011, 2012 and 2013 Energy Star® Sustained Excellence Award. With U.S. headquarters in Irvine, CA, the company operates an appliance park in New Bern, North Carolina, comprised of state-of-the-art factories for dishwashers, ranges, ovens and cooktops.

 

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Posted by on in News

RJ_20141105-144921_1.jpgIn support of RJ Tonks, a senior sports management major and marketing minor at Waynesburg University, business students held Rise Up for RJ Saturday, Nov. 1, during half time of the football game. President Douglas G. Lee, as well as members of the Waynesburg University Business Club, presented Tonks with a check for $8,000 at the game.

After the check was created, donations continued to pour in, totaling $8,322 at last count for Tonks’ treatments at the Carrick Brain Centers in Marietta, Ga. This far surpassed the club’s original goal of $6,000.

Ashley Clark, a senior marketing major and accounting minor from McDonald, Pa.; Joshua Dains, a senior business management major from Clarksville, Pa.; and Kaitlyn Marteney, a senior forensic accounting and criminal justice major from Berlin, Pa., spearheaded the fundraiser to help Tonks defray the costs of treatment.

The students integrated service with learning by using skills gained in their business classes.

“We designed, ordered, sold and distributed the shirts, as well as everything in between,” said Dains. “Our professors were great people to bounce ideas off of, and they proved to be an awesome support system.”

The funds raised will go toward treatment and travel costs for Tonks. When he was eight, Tonks developed a virus that left a scar on his brain. For many years, the scar impaired Tonks’ hand eye coordination, mobility, speech, balance and fine motor skills. As a freshman, Tonks became dependent on a wheelchair for mobility.

“We are all really good friends with RJ,” said Clark. “We had heard that he may not be able to go down for treatment this semester because it is very expensive. We know that RJ's goal is to walk unassisted at graduation this May, and we understand how important that is to him.”

The senior Business Club majors designed a shirt to sell to staff, faculty, students and community members. The front of the shirt read "Rise Up for RJ," while the back contains Tonks’ personal motto, the Bible verse Jeremiah 29:11. 

In total, the club sold more than 600 shirts during the six-week fundraiser.

“It's an incredible feeling to know I have support from the entire Waynesburg University community,” said Tonks. “I was amazed at how much money was raised from the sale of the shirts. I am so thankful for my classmates in the Business Club that organized the fundraiser and everyone that bought or sold a shirt.”

The students held a “black out” at the November 1 Waynesburg versus Thomas Moore football game to sell shirts as the final fundraising push. Members of the crowd purchased and wore the black shirts in a show of support.

“We have all been greatly impacted by RJ's enthusiasm, motivation and humbling personality; we wanted to do something special for him.” Clark said. “His treatment costs $5,500 for one week. This amount does not include travel expenses like food, lodging, gas, etc. We are so happy to have surpassed our goal.”

For more information, contact cla7773@student.waynesburg.edu.

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