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b2ap3_thumbnail_3-9-Crosby-lecture_Gray.jpgWaynesburg University will host guest speaker Dr. Harry Gray Tuesday, March 29, at 7:30 p.m. in Alumni Hall as part of the Glenn A. and Jane L. Crosby Lecture Series. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend. 

Gray is the Arnold O. Beckman professor of chemistry and the founding director of the Beckman Institute at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Gray has published more than 850 research papers and 18 books related to chemical bonding, elements and the field of organic chemistry. 

“Dr. Gray is a renowned and well-respected chemist,” said Evonne Baldauff, chair of the Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science and associate professor of chemistry. “Having him visit campus and interact with our students is a fantastic opportunity. He is an engaging speaker, and I anticipate that those attending the Crosby Lecture will gain an understanding of the ways scientists are working to advance solar energy capture and conversion.”  

Gray’s lecture, “The 21st Century Solar Army,” will address the current trend of designing solar-driven molecular machines that could be used on a global scale to store solar energy. Since storing solar energy for use at night is a challenge in the industry, Gray will discuss what he and his fellow researchers have been doing to address the problem. 

Gray has made inspirational contributions to the understanding of chemical bonding of metal complexes, mechanisms of inorganic reactions, spectroscopy and magneto-chemistry of inorganic compounds. He received the Wolf Prize in Chemistry in 2004 for “pioneering work in bioinorganic chemistry, unraveling novel principles of structure and long-range electron transfer in proteins.” Gray is also the recipient of the National Medal of Science from President Ronald Regan in 1986.

The Glenn A. and Jane L. Crosby Lectures, funded by 1950 Magna Cum Laude graduates of Waynesburg University, Glenn A. and Jane Lichtenfels Crosby, bring to the University visiting scholars who are distinguished in their disciplines. During the visit, the scholars often interact with faculty, staff and students, giving guest lectures in classes, formal presentations and informal group talks. The event culminates in a final public lecture.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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The Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science at Waynesburg University will hold its annual Science Day Thursday, Dec. 10. Organized in conjunction with the Office of Admissions and the American Chemical Society, local high school students and University applicants have the opportunity to spend the day as a science student.

Intended to excite high school students about science, participants will enjoy hands-on activities and lectures by students and faculty as well as demonstrations. A question-and-answer session will be offered to provide prospective students with the opportunity to ask undergraduates about the college experience.

Special presentations in chemistry, biology and forensic science will occur in addition to a tour of the marine biology lab, all hosted by professors and students.

Dr. Evonne Baldauff, chair of the Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science and associate professor of chemistry, believes high school students will benefit from attending Science Day.

“Science Day is important because it gives high school students the opportunity to see firsthand what it is like to study science at a college level,” said Baldauff. “While on campus, students will interact with faculty and current undergraduates and experience the exciting programs we have in the sciences at Waynesburg University.”

The University will also host an additional Science Day event for prospective students during the spring semester, Thursday, April 14.

For more information, contact Baldauff at ebaldauf@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3617.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Dr. Evonne A. Baldauff, chairperson for the chemistry and forensic science department and associate professor of chemistry, attended the 2015 ACS Leadership Institute.

Michael Cipoletti, assistant professor of forensic science, received the 2015 Lucas-Hathaway Teaching Excellence Award for a faculty member with a history of teaching excellence.

Dr. Bradley Davis was named the assistant professor of chemistry in the fall of 2014. He received his B.S. degree from Waynesburg University and a Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University.

Dr. Chad Keyes was named assistant professor of chemistry in the fall of 2014. He received his B.S. degree from Ball State University and a Ph.D. from Purdue University.

Waynesburg University’s American Chemical Society (ACS) student chapter was selected to receive the “Outstanding Chapter Award” from the American Chemical Society for the fifth consecutive year in December of 2014. The award is a result of the chapter’s activities conducted during the 2012-13 academic year. Waynesburg University was one of only 44 chapters selected to receive the “Outstanding Award.”

The Waynesburg University ACS chapter was instrumental in planning undergraduate programming at the ACS Central Eastern Regional Meeting (CERM) held Wednesday, Oct. 29, through Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014, at the Doubletree Hotel in Greentree, Pa. Prior to the event, the ACS chapter wrote a grant and was awarded $2,800 from the ACS undergraduate office. The monetary award was used to plan and fund the meeting. 

Students of Waynesburg University’s Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science traveled to the Community College of Allegheny County, South Campus, Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015, and Saturday, March 28, 2015, to work the Southwestern Pennsylvania Science Bowl. The Science Bowl is an academic competition where regional teams from middle and high schools showcase their expertise and compete against one another in a question-and-answer format similar to the television show Jeopardy. Questions covered biology, math, chemistry, physics, energy, and earth and space science. In addition to sending volunteers, Waynesburg University served as a sponsor for the event. 

The Waynesburg University Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science hosted Girl Scout Day Saturday, March 21, 2015. Organized in conjunction with the West Virginia Black Diamond Girl Scout Council, the Forensic Science Club and the Criminal Justice Club, the program was designed for Girl Scout troop members to earn a badge while learning about the sciences. According to Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science, the Forensic Science Club and Criminal Justice Club both have a dedication to service. Reflecting Waynesburg University’s mission, both clubs are constantly seeking ways to utilize their knowledge and enthusiasm for the field. 

The Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science at Waynesburg University hosted Science Day Thursday, April 16, 2015. Organized in conjunction with the Office of Admissions and the American Chemical Society, local high school students and University applicants had the opportunity to spend the day as a science student, enjoying hands-on activities and lectures by students and faculty as well as demonstrations. 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Untitled1.pngThe Waynesburg University Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science hosted Girl Scout Day Saturday, March 21. Organized in conjunction with the West Virginia Black Diamond Girl Scout Council, the Forensic Science Club and the Criminal Justice Club, the program was designed for Girl Scout troop members to earn a badge while learning about the sciences. 

The one-day event offered the Special Agent Cadette BREATHE Badge, which requires Girl Scout Cadettes to be exposed to an introduction to forensic science and other crime-solving techniques. 

Traveling from West Virginia, six Cadette Troops with Scouts ranging from the ages of 11 to 14 participated in the event. 

To satisfy the requirements of the Special Agent Badge, Waynesburg University planned five workshops in which the girls participated. The workshops included fingerprinting, interviewing and interrogations, participating in a mock crime scene, presumptive blood testing and touring the forensics laboratory. 

“The forensic science and criminal justice clubs are frequently seeking to increase opportunities for young girls to be involved in the sciences,” said Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science at Waynesburg University. “Subjects like physics and chemistry can be very intimidating for young girls; therefore, we like to give them a fun and approachable way to experience the sciences for themselves.”

According to Musko, the Forensic Science Club and Criminal Justice Club both have a dedication to service. Reflecting Waynesburg University’s mission, both clubs are constantly seeking out ways to utilize their knowledge and enthusiasm for the field. 

The workshops were run by Waynesburg University faculty as well as current juniors and seniors in the forensic science and criminal justice clubs. This event afforded the opportunity for current students to develop presentation and leadership skills as well as participate in a service-oriented project.  

The Girl Scouts of the United States of America aims to empower girls and to help teach values such as honesty, fairness, courage, compassion, character, sisterhood, confidence and citizenship through activities including camping, community service, learning first aid and earning badges by acquiring practical skills.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Students of Waynesburg University’s Department of Chemistry will travel to the Community College of Allegheny County, South Campus, Saturday, Feb. 21, and Saturday, March 28, to work the Southwestern Pennsylvania Science Bowl. 

The Science Bowl is an academic competition where regional teams from middle and high schools showcase their expertise and compete against one another in a question-and-answer format similar to the television show Jeopardy. Questions cover biology, math, chemistry, physics, energy, and earth and space science. 

The Waynesburg students attending the event will assist in a variety of volunteer work to aid in the planning and execution process. At the event, students will assist with set up, schedule review, prep work, officiating the competition and other additional roles. 

“Volunteering at the Science Bowl engages our students in a situation through which they are able to use their scientific prowess to benefit the community,” said Dr. Evonne Baldauff, assistant professor of chemistry and chair of the Department of Chemistry at Waynesburg University. “The event requires a lot of coordination and we hope to help in any way that is beneficial.”

In addition to sending volunteers, Waynesburg University is serving as a sponsor for the event. Waynesburg’s sponsorship will help offset the cost of team materials and prizes, lunch and snacks for participants as well as incidental expenses related to maintaining the quality of the event. 

“Waynesburg decided to be a sponsor for the Science Bowl to build excitement for the sciences at the middle school and high school levels,” said Robin King, senior vice president of enrollment and university relations. “I also see this as an opportunity for our students to showcase Waynesburg University while being involved in the event.” 

According to Baldauff, sponsoring and participating in the Science Bowl is a “fantastic” resource to get local middle school and high school students invested in science. She sends volunteers to show Waynesburg University’s support of their efforts.

“When our students volunteer to serve in this capacity, it represents to others the strong commitment that Waynesburg University places on education and involvement in the community,” said Baldauff.

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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