Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in communication news

Posted by on in Alumni

Amy Mina, a 2011 Waynesburg University alumna, has recently been promoted from writer to associate producer for “The Intelligence Report with Trish Regan” on the Fox Business Network in New York City.

In her new position with the daily afternoon television program, Mina’s responsibilities include writing spontaneous scripts, designing graphics for air, providing in-depth research for the on-air talent, producing segments and packages in the field as well as working closely with the producer of the show.

Landing a job as a production assistant for Fox News’ sister network immediately after graduation, Mina cited her perseverance to become successful in a field she was passionate about. She maximized her networking abilities and knowledge of the field to climb the ranks in the media industry – both of which she acquired from her education at Waynesburg University.

“Not only did the Department of Communication at Waynesburg fully prepare me for the workforce, it gave me a necessary edge over the competition,” said Mina, who has a bachelor’s degree in communication and a minor in business. “With a limited number of openings, networks really want to see college candidates with a working knowledge of TV production, script writing, current events, and more importantly, a willingness to learn.”

Reflecting on her Waynesburg experience and the numerous hands-on opportunities the Department of Communication afforded to her, Mina provides current students with some advice:

“Find your passion and pursue it relentlessly! Know your field, network constantly, outwork your peers and always go above and beyond in the workplace.”

Hits: 48

Posted by on in Blog

b2ap3_thumbnail_9-15-Kimmie.jpgThe Yellow Jacket: an award-winning student newspaper since 1924, and the place where communication students come to prosper.

As a freshman journalism student at Waynesburg, I knew I’d get involved with the Yellow Jacket. But for that first semester, I was extremely hesitant to devote myself to it. I’m just a freshman – how valuable can I really be? What if my work isn’t good enough? What if I don’t find my niche? How will I get my other work done? How will I have time to sleep?

Two years later, as a junior, I’m the Executive Editor for the Yellow Jacket. Some of these questions still eat at me – I don’t pretend to have all the answers. Regardless, I know this is where I’m meant to be. A lot of my work for the newspaper is behind the scenes, but I’m making my mark. And at the same time, the Yellow Jacket is making its mark on me. Here are three of the most important lessons I’m learning as Executive Editor, each of which has given me insight into my field, myself and my future.

  1. There CAN be enough time. The Yellow Jacket is issued weekly. I spend every Monday and Tuesday night with my staff, working far past midnight to create all 16 pages of the newspaper. Then, we spend the day on Wednesday (in between classes) with our advisor, finalizing everything and sending it off to print. I use Thursday and Friday to interview sources and write articles for the paper, and then I spend the weekend attending to all of my other schoolwork and seeing family and friends. Come Monday, I begin again, with classes and a job added into the mix. It used to seem impossible – and terrifying. Now, it’s doable. So far, I’ve found time for everything – though it sometimes means I sacrifice a full night’s sleep. The point is, effective time management is a reachable goal and an essential skill for college and beyond. The Yellow Jacket has shown me my strengths and my limits, and together, we’ve struck a balance.
  2. Flying solo isn’t an option.  When I was named as the next Executive Editor, the most popular piece of advice I got was, “You need someone on your side.” I’m lucky enough to have a whole support team, without whom I’d be floundering. I have a staff at the Yellow Jacket who works with me every day to help make the newspaper a success and my life easier. I have two best friends who listen to all of my dilemmas, support all of my endeavors and drag me away from my work to relax with them at least once a week. I have an advisor who takes a genuine interest in my life, future and well-being, in addition to guiding my every Yellow Jacket step. I’m an independent person, but the Yellow Jacket has taught me that the best results arrive when you rely on others. 
  3. The real world is coming - get ready.  The real world doesn’t allow sleeping in until 10 on weekdays. The real world brings constant pressure from superiors to perform well. The real world means being professional, becoming a leader and establishing who you are. More than any experience I’ve had, the Yellow Jacket is getting me ready for that world. I can’t complain about getting up early – I know it’ll only get earlier when I graduate. I can’t crack under the pressure of responsibility – I have to learn to be at my best when there are people counting on me. I can’t be afraid to come into my own and be a leader – that’s what will lead to success in the future. I’m in training every day for how to interact professionally with my peers and my superiors, and I know I’ll be thanking the Yellow Jacket when I leave school and those skills really count. 

From being a scared, shy, intimidated freshman to becoming Executive Editor, the Yellow Jacket is, more than anything else, responsible for showing me the way. I don’t know where I’m headed after May 2017, but I know this: the Yellow Jacket has changed me – for good.


Hits: 580

Posted by on in Blog

b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_0675_20150717-154747_1.JPGLike most 18-year-olds trying to decide what it was that I wanted to do with the rest of my life, I was confused, lost and arguably disoriented. As I heard classmates speak of their future plans, neatly organized into a college major and future profession, I felt the panic start to sink in. 

Though I had already committed to Waynesburg University for the fall of 2012 and had declared my major as accounting, I was far from certain that I would spend the rest of my life crunching numbers. Nonetheless, in August of 2012, I embarked on my journey at Waynesburg University. 

In my first semester as a business major, I did exceedingly well, earning a 4.0 and ending the semester with good rapport with my professors whom ensured me that I held promise in my pursuit of a career in accounting. I regarded my successes as a good sign, and thought that maybe I wasn’t as lost as I had thought.

I continued on in the program, taking another accounting class in which I continued to excel, but deep down, I knew that I was lacking a passion for my studies. At times, it took a great deal of effort to bring myself to study my business textbooks. 

On the other hand, the College Composition course that I enrolled in during my second semester commanded my attention. I loved that it allowed me to write persuasively and develop compelling, fact-based arguments about hard issues facing our society. In other words, I was hooked and wanted to know where this new- found passion could lead.  

I decided to email my professor, Mrs. Nofsinger, and ask to meet with her to discuss my fascination with her course and my desire to learn more about career options. As a freshman, I was not yet aware of the relationship-centered culture of Waynesburg University, but I was about to discover what the university that I enrolled in was all about. 

My professor invited me to join her for lunch to discuss what was on my mind. We talked for an hour and she suggested I take a journalism course, promised me books for further exploration and recommended that I visit the counseling center for more vocational guidance. She also informed me that if I ever needed anything, to just let her know.

I was blown away by her kindness, but after meeting with several other professors and faculty members to discuss my options and smooth out the details of changing majors, I quickly discovered that this kindness was simply the Waynesburg way. Flash-forward to my senior year as a student in the Department of Communication, and I now know that my professors are not just teachers; they are mentors and personal resources there to encourage and offer advice to students when possible. 

Though unsure of the path I had chosen upon graduating high school, I could not be happier with my decision to come to Waynesburg University. While initially lost, I found my way in the loving atmosphere that is Waynesburg University. 


Hits: 783

Posted by on in Alumni

b2ap3_thumbnail_Nick-Farrell.jpgFrom the time he was 5 years old, Nick Farrell could be found enthusiastically recreating the action he witnessed during Steeler football games on his homemade football field mat using plastic football helmets. His colossal imagination and his love of being in front of the home video camera combined to create a confident response to the all-too-familiar question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

More than 15 years later, Farrell, a 2015 communication and sports broadcasting/sports information alumnus, is a Monongalia and Preston County reporter at WBOY in Clarksburg, West Virginia, which comes as no surprise to those who know him best.

Farrell, a self-proclaimed one-man band, shoots video, conducts interviews, edits packages and writes scripts for anchors for three to four stories per day. In addition to possessing the array of skills necessary to tackle the aforementioned, Farrell takes note of how his own college experiences prepared him for his career.

“At Waynesburg, I was able to grow both as a writer and as a broadcaster. Being well-rounded in that regard makes me more confident in my approach at WBOY,” he said.

For Farrell, his time spent on the staff of the Yellow Jacket, Waynesburg University’s student-run newspaper, helped to prepare him for the fast-paced environment at a pro newsroom.

“I learned how to schedule my time, juggle heavy workloads and adjust to last-second changes at the Jacket. All of those skills are necessary — only now, it's on a daily basis,” he said.

Passionate about his field and the opportunities it presents, Farrell looks forward to using it as a vehicle to make a difference in the world.

“What journalism is, to me, is reporting the facts and answering questions. It's about telling the stories that will impact lives. It's about doing your homework, gathering information and presenting it in a way that makes the viewer ponder the information they just ingested,” he said. “If a story I write moves a viewer, informs a viewer or causes a viewer to think critically about a subject, then I've done my job. I take pride in that responsibility, knowing that viewers in our region rely on our newsroom to provide them with the information they desire.”

Farrell credits his Waynesburg education and accomplished faculty for his current position, and recognizes that his personal growth is just as valuable as the academic degree he received.

“Waynesburg is the place that confirmed my passion and helped me begin to realize the dream I first dreamt as a 5 year old,” he said. “At Waynesburg, I discovered how truly blessed I am to have a family that loves me, friends that support me and instructors who invested time in me.”

Although being a play-by-play announcer is his ultimate career goal, Farrell said he’s happy with where he is right now and grateful for the journey that has led him to this point.

“I'll never know what my life would look like if I had chosen to attend another college,” Farrell said. “Somehow, though, I have a feeling that my life wouldn't be as fulfilling as it is.”

Hits: 369

Posted by on in Alumni

b2ap3_thumbnail_Alfonso-Ferrari.jpgA deep-rooted love of America’s favorite pastime, two legendary voices and an unwavering desire to answer God’s call have led Alfonso Ferrari to his current profession.

Ferrari, a 2015 sports broadcasting/sports information graduate, was recently named the official radio voice of the Pennsylvania Rebellion. The Rebellion, a member of the National Pro Fastpitch Softball League, is located in Washington, Pennsylvania, and holds a nearly 50-game schedule, allowing Ferrari to share his love of sports announcing with a national audience.

From the time he was 5 years old, Ferrari said he could recall feeling as if he were meant to work in some aspect of baseball, a sport he calls his “first love.” Validating his aspirations, Ferrari, a native of Tucson, Arizona, grew up listening to Greg Schulte, announcer for the Arizona Diamondbacks, who would become one of the two legendary voices responsible for further fueling his passion for the industry.

“As I got older I knew that I wanted to be an announcer,” he said. “I knew that is where God had designed my steps to go.”

Ferrari is responsible for traveling with The Rebellion, announcing both home and away games, and daily preparing information related to The Rebellion and the opposing team, a vital role of an effective broadcaster.

Ferrari credits his Waynesburg University education for his ability to land and accept his current position.

“The education I received taught me what the broadcasting field is like, and taught me the skills that are necessary to be successful,” he said.

Ferrari specifically credits Lanny Frattare, assistant professor of communication at Waynesburg University and play-by-play announcer for the Pittsburgh Pirates for 33 years (1976-2008), for his choice to attend Waynesburg University.

“I knew I would be learning from a man who had been where I wanted to go,” he said.

That choice, and Frattare’s involvement in it, would prove to be a wise one as Ferrari’s undergraduate years unfolded.

“He inspired me and taught me what I needed to do to be successful,” he said. “His taking the time to meet with me to go over my work and tell me what I needed to work on and improve was instrumental.”

Determined to follow in the footsteps of the man he had grown up listening to, Ferrari dreams of the day that he, too, will be a recognized voice for D-Back fans around the world.

“[My] current position is the beginning of the journey that will lead to my dream,” he said.

As he puts his time in to advance in a competitive industry, Ferrari hopes that he will someday be the same light and example that his role models have been for him.

Hits: 366