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A Waynesburg University Graduate Counseling Program faculty member, as well as a faculty-and-student team, recently had scholarly papers accepted for presentation at national conferences.

Dr. Devon Manderino, assistant professor of counseling, will present her original research on spirituality in counseling at the North Atlantic Regional Conference of the Association of Counselor Educators and Supervision in Providence, R.I., later this month. 

Additionally, Laura Smith, a graduate counseling student; Dr. Scott Tracy, director of graduate programs in counseling and assistant professor of counseling; and Dr. Mark Lepore, an adjunct faculty member, will present their clinical poster, “Risk and Resiliency: The Prevention and Aftermath of School Violence,” at the Annual Conference of the American Counseling Association in Orlando, Fla., in April. 

“Waynesburg University students and faculty are committed both to adding to new knowledge about relevant counseling topics and serving the Christian mission of the institution,” Tracy said. “Both of these projects represent those commitments, as well as receiving the approval from peer reviewers.”

Manderino studied how spirituality has been directly linked to positive outcomes in counseling, while spiritual crises contribute to psychological symptoms such as anxiety, depression and psychosis. Despite this recognized link, counselor training related to spirituality is inconsistent and untested.

She said her project was aimed at developmentally educational activities that may significantly improve counselor trainee competency levels regarding the role of spirituality and religion in counseling.

Smith, Tracy and Lepore’s poster focused on the prevalence of school violence incidents, which have illuminated the need for a better understanding of the factors that predict mental health outcomes for students, teachers, school administrators, first responders and adjacent school communities.

“In almost all instances of school violence, somebody close to the perpetrator knew of the plan before it happened; however, in most cases the warning signs become clear only after the event takes place,” Smith said.

The poster outlines a model for understanding community needs that result from exposure to school violence with treatment strategies that may help affected communities heal and move forward.

“This project proposed the development of a collaborative system for students, teachers, parents and community members to provide children with emotional and social skills training, and when necessary, report concerns about the threat of violence,” Tracy said.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Students in Waynesburg University’s Master of Arts in Counseling Program achieved a milestone during the most recent National Counselor Examination for Licensure and Certification (NCE), collectively scoring above the national average for accredited counseling programs. One Waynesburg University student obtained the top national score, an honor shared with the top 5 percent of examinees nationwide. 

More than 4,000 graduate counselors sat for the exam.

“The NCE is the national benchmark for knowledge and skills in the counseling profession,” said Scott Tracy, director of graduate programs in counseling at Waynesburg. “Waynesburg University’s Program has reached a point in its evolution that makes it comparable to similar programs at large universities.”

The NCE is used for two purposes: national counselor certification and state counselor licensure. The purpose of the NCE is to assess knowledge, skills and abilities viewed as important for providing effective counseling services. The NCE is designed to be general in nature. It is intended to assess cognitive knowledge which should be known by all counselors regardless of their individual professional specialties.
Satisfactory performance on the NCE is one of the criteria used by the National Board for Certified Counselors to identify professionals who may be eligible to become National Certified Counselors.

Waynesburg University’s Master of Arts in Counseling Program is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). CACREP is an independent agency recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation to accredit master's degree and doctoral programs in counseling. To achieve accreditation, programs voluntarily submit a self-study that is reviewed against the CACREP Standards by counselors and counselor educators to ensure that students receive a quality educational experience.

Courses within Waynesburg University’s Graduate and Professional Studies (GAPS) Programs are offered in eight-week accelerated sessions with year-round admission dates. Classes meet one or two nights per week, Monday through Thursday, from 6 to 10 p.m., at four convenient locations: Monroeville, Seven Fields, Southpointe and Waynesburg.

For more information, contact Tracy at stracy@waynesburg.edu or 724-743-2259.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Waynesburg University's Master of Arts in Counseling Program has recently been accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).
 
“CACREP accreditation is the most widely recognized and sought after accreditation for counseling programs,” said Waynesburg University Provost Dr. Robert J. Graham. “This is a wonderful recognition of the quality of our program and faculty and is the result of several years of hard work by the counseling faculty.”
 
CACREP is an independent agency recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation to accredit master's degree and doctoral programs in counseling. To achieve accreditation, programs voluntarily submit a self-study that is reviewed against the CACREP Standards by counselors and counselor educators to ensure that students receive a quality educational experience.
 
“This national accreditation is evidence of Waynesburg University's commitment to provide high-quality, state-of-the-art programs designed to meet the behavioral health needs of today's society,” said Dr. Scott Tracy, director of Waynesburg University's Graduate Programs in Counseling.
 
For the 2011-12 academic year, students within the University's Counseling Program achieved a 100 percent pass rate on the National Counselor Exam, which serves as the licensing exam for most states, including Pennsylvania.
 
Designed in accordance with the standards set forth by the American Counseling Association (ACA), Waynesburg's Counseling Program offers two specialized tracks: Clinical Mental Health Counseling and Addiction Counseling, which is one of the first CACREP approved addictions programs in Pennsylvania.
 
The curriculum was designed and implemented in 2004 by Dr. James Hepburn, professor of psychology in the University's Graduate and Professional Studies Program. The program quickly grew with the enrollment of many students interested in becoming licensed.
 
“Our focus has always been on providing a quality curriculum to our students,” said Mariner. “Dr. Hepburn was instrumental in the program achieving such great results. Dr. Tracy has followed in his footsteps and provided great leadership through the CACREP evaluation process.”
 
Courses are offered in eight-week accelerated sessions with year-round admission dates. Classes meet one or two nights per week, Monday through Thursday, from 6 to 10 p.m., at four convenient locations: Southpointe, North Hills, Monroeville and Waynesburg.
 
For more information, contact Tracy at stracy@waynesburg.edu or 724-743-2259.
 
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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

 

 

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