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b2ap3_thumbnail_special-olympics-logo.jpgWaynesburg University’s Criminal Justice Club will host a Special Olympics Meet-and-Greet event Saturday, April 18, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., in the Waynesburg University Gymnasium. 

In conjunction with the Special Olympics Greene County Program, the purpose of the event is to inform the community of the local program and the benefits of participating. The two organizations welcome all prospective Special Olympics athletes, parents and individuals looking to volunteer at Special Olympics-sponsored events. 

The event will include demonstrations of sports the program will offer, testimonials from athletes and coaches as well as sign-ups for those interested in getting involved. 

“The meet-and-greet is a combined effort by criminal justice students, communication students and Waynesburg University alumni who share the vision of bringing training and competition to our Special Olympic athletes in Greene County,” said James Tanda, instructor of criminal justice at Waynesburg University and member of the Special Olympics Greene County Board.

The Criminal Justice Club, which resurrected the Special Olympics Greene County Program last year, hopes to gain athletes from the area who are committed to breaking down the barriers that exclude people with intellectual disabilities. 

“For the past two years, Waynesburg University’s Criminal Justice Club students have embraced the Special Olympics with energy and passion,” said Tanda. “Many have taken the freezing cold Polar Plunge and others are planning on running in the Law Enforcement Torch Run in our continued effort to raise money and awareness for the Special Olympics in our community.”

Members of the Criminal Justice Club as well as additional students from the University will volunteer at the event. The volunteers anticipate helping prospective athletes understand the program as well as making connections with them. 

Special Olympics is something very near and dear to my heart,” said Taylor White, sophomore public relations major and volunteer for Special Olympics Greene County. “The program allows athletes to open up and showcase their talents. I am excited to be a part of this event and help put a smile on their faces.” 

For more information, contact Tanda at jtanda@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3371.

Special Olympics is a global movement that unleashes the human spirit through the transformative power and joy of sports, every day around the world. The organization empowers people with intellectual disabilities to become accepted and valued members of their communities, which leads to a more respectful and inclusive society for all.  

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Posted by on in News

b2ap3_thumbnail_CJ.pngThe Waynesburg University Department of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences and the Office of Admissions will host the spring Mock Crime Scene Workshop Saturday, March 28, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

The Mock Crime Scene Workshop provides high school students the opportunity to analyze crime scenes and collect and process evidence alongside Waynesburg University students and faculty, as well as experts in the field. 

The Workshop introduces prospective criminal justice students to the practical application of crime scene investigation, forensic analysis and related criminal investigative methods by law enforcement from local, state and federal levels who partner with the University’s Department of Criminal Justice. 

Students will attend technical workshops in the morning and then apply what they've learned in mock crime scenes or active response scenarios in the afternoon. Workshops related to arrest techniques, interview and interrogation practices and a firearms training simulator will also be offered.

“The students who have an interest in this profession get a firsthand look at the reality of crime scene investigation while also networking with professionals in the field of criminal justice, law enforcement, and forensic sciences,” said James Tanda, instructor of criminal justice at Waynesburg University.  “The University also benefits by the inherent recruitment of many of these students who decide to choose Waynesburg’s Criminal Justice program after attending this and similar CSI Camps at the our University.”

Under the instruction of University students, faculty and representatives from the Pennsylvania State Police, by the end of the day, students will be able to apply the principles and techniques learned to a challenging crime scene. 

Space is limited. To register, or for more information, contact the Office of Admissions at 800-225-7393.

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Waynesburg University will host its tenth annual Crime Scene Investigation summer camp Sunday, June 21, through Friday, June 26, on the campus of Waynesburg University. Participants will gain valuable insight into the field of forensic science through experiential learning and strategically planned activities. 

All workshops are interconnected through a series of evidence and crime scenes, designed with a hands-on approach to learning. Students will learn how to properly collect, preserve and analyze evidence. 

During this six-day, five-night experience, students are given the opportunity to study with experts in forensic science as well as professionals from various fields including state and federal agencies. This year, camp topics will include scene processing, burial remains excavation, surveillance and search warrant execution, forensic analysis of biological evidence and questioned documents analysis. 

Participants of the camp will train with special agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation Biometric Center of Excellence, Pennsylvania State Police Forensic Services, Bureau of Alcohol and the tobacco and Firearms (ATF), as well as representatives from Council Bluffs, Iowa, Police Department. The camp will enable students to enhance their knowledge and understanding of forensic topics, as well as allow them to make valuable connections with professionals and fellow peers in the field. 

“The camp affords participating students a chance to experience the realities of the professions in which they have found some interest,” said Michael Cipoletti, camp director, director of the Forensic Science Program and assistant professor of forensic science at Waynesburg University. “Students’ perspectives are typically formed from popular television shows or books; this camp gives them the ability to work with real professionals, ask them what their jobs are like and how they got to where they are.” 

Individuals entering 11th grade, 12th grade or who are spring 2015 high school graduates are eligible to attend the camp.

Participating Waynesburg University faculty include: 

•Mike Cipoletti, camp director, director of the Forensic Science Program and assistant professor of forensic science at Waynesburg University, previously worked for the Pennsylvania State Police Crime Lab. He served as a forensic scientist and lab system quality specialist in chemistry and drug identification.

•John Mcllwain, camp advisor and adjunct instructor of criminal justice at Waynesburg University, has taught for 16 years. He began his professional career as a U.S. Army Military Police Officer in Germany. Mcllwain left the military in 1977 and became a Special Agent with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. He conducted investigations of the Federal Firearms Laws for 11 years.

•Faith Musko, camp advisor and instructor of forensic science at Waynesburg University, is a former toxicologist and forensic chemist with AIT Laboratories in Indianapolis, Ind. She is a member of the American Academy of Forensic Scientists, the American Chemical Society and the Society of Forensic Toxicologists.

•Adam Jack, camp co-creator, chair of the Department of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences and assistant professor of forensic science at Waynesburg University, is a former forensic detective with the Westmoreland County District Attorney’s Office and police officer in Rostraver Township, Pa. He is a Certified Senior Crime Scene Analyst through the International Association for Identification and has testified as an expert in Crime Scene Investigation and fingerprints.

•Marietta Wright, camp workshop presenter and assistant professor of biology at Waynesburg University, previously conducted molecular biology research in type I diabetes at the University of Pittsburgh. Her main areas of interest are cell and molecular biology, genetics, DNA profiling and scientific teaching.

•James Tanda, camp advisor and instructor of criminal justice at Waynesburg University, brings a wealth of experience to the program. Prior to joining the University, James worked as a Special Agent with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms for 27 years and has also served as a Contracted Explosives Specialist with the U.S. Government.

To register, visit csicamp.waynesburg.edu or call 724-225-7393.

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_imagerrrr.jpgWaynesburg University’s Criminal Justice Club participated in the Pittsburgh Polar Bear Plunge at Heinz Field Saturday, Dec. 6, to raise money for Special Olympics. 

Approximately 20 students joined Waynesburg University instructor of criminal justice James Tanda in the plunge. The Criminal Justice Club raised more than $1,500 leading up to the event. This was the second year that the club participated. In two years, the club has raised more than $2,500. 

The Pittsburgh Polar Bear Plunge Weekend is Special Olympics Pennsylvania’s largest fundraiser, grossing more than 1 million dollars during the first four years. Individuals and teams, alongside Special Olympics athletes, take the plunge into the Ohio River on Pittsburgh’s North Shore. 

Student representatives from freshmen to seniors gave up their Saturday to join more than 1,800 other plungers in the freezing rain for the cause. This year, the air temperature was 39 degrees and the water temperature was 38 degrees at the time of the plunge.

“Our goal was to follow the University's mission of service to this very needy cause while also connecting our criminal justice and forensic science students to a network of law enforcement, attorneys, federal agencies and others in the profession,” said Tanda.   “This year's donation will be used to help further the mission of Special Olympics Pennsylvania and help support the more than 20,000 athletes served in the commonwealth.”

According to Tanda, half of the money raised by Waynesburg’s Criminal Justice Club will go directly to Greene County's Special Olympics program, which Waynesburg's Criminal Justice Club resurrected last year.

Tanda has plunged every year since the event’s inception - both as an agent with his former federal agency - and now leading Waynesburg's involvement in the service project.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Posted by on in Alumni

Criminal Justice

Federal Law Enforcement Officer at the Federal Correctional Institution

Cumberland, Md.

Additional Info:

  • Fort Hill High School Football Coach
  • Bachelor of Science, Waynesburg University, 2013

“Being involved in the Criminal Justice program at Waynesburg University gave me a huge benefit when looking for different jobs in my field of work. The wide range of classes to take in the criminal justice major was a huge benefit. The professors having careers in the subjects they taught established great rapport with me and other students.  Also, investing a lot of time as a student athlete at Waynesburg has given me the tools I need to become a passionate coach.”

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