Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in criminal justice administration news

Waynesburg University’s Criminal Justice Club will participate in the annual Waynesburg Borough Halloween parade sponsored by the Lions Club to support the Special Olympics Greene County Program. The parade will be held Thursday, Oct. 29, immediately following the Borough’s trick-or-treating tradition behind the Greene County Office Building.

The Criminal Justice Club is partnering with the Special Olympics Greene County management team to create awareness of the Special Olympics program in the county. Both organizations have chosen to participate in this event because of the large amount of community members who attend the parade each year. Their goal is to inform the community of the program as well as the benefits for individuals with intellectual disabilities to sign up as athletes. In addition, both organizations are looking to attract volunteers.

“This is one of the many events the Criminal Justice Club participates in to help spread awareness of the Special Olympics program,” said Todd Breninghouse, senior criminal justice administration major and president of the Criminal Justice Club. “Special Olympics is such a meaningful and amazing organization, and we want to make sure the community is well aware of the opportunities one can gain from being a part of it.”

The Criminal Justice Club and the Special Olympics Greene County management team will walk behind the Special Olympics athletes in the parade wearing Special Olympics T-shirts in support of the organization. Also, the two teams will be distributing candy promoting the program during the parade.

For more information, contact Randi Chambers, manager of Special Olympics Greene County at 724-998-8109.

Special Olympics is a global movement that unleashes the human spirit through the transformative power and joy of sports, every day around the world. The organizations empowers people with intellectual disabilities to become accepted and valued members of their communities, which leads to a more respectful and inclusive society for all.

# # #

Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 320

Waynesburg University’s Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science and Department of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences are teaming up for a community outreach event at Jefferson-Morgan Elementary School Thursday, Oct. 22.

All fourth graders at the school will have the opportunity to participate in four workshops covering information about the importance of shoeprints in criminal investigation. A group of University juniors and seniors from the Forensic Science and Criminal Justice clubs will lead each workshop.

The elementary students will rotate through the 15-minute workshops, which are entitled, “Class Characteristics of Footwear,” “Individual Characteristics of Footwear,” “Footwear Recovery and Lifting” and “Analysis of Crime Scene Footwear Impressions.” Under the guise of investigating a case about a lunch thief, participants will learn about why footwear impression evidence is important, how to collect imprints and how to analyze them to identify suspects or culprits.

Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science at the University, emphasizes that if students want to pursue a future in criminal justice, they will be required to master a wide variety of skills.

“To obtain a career in investigation requires an individual to wear many hats which all require an inquisitive nature,” said Musko. “This inquisitive nature involves both analytical and critical thinking skills, which is a necessary part of student development. By giving the students at Jefferson-Morgan a crime scene to solve, we are giving them a fun and thrilling way to enhance these skills.”

For more information, contact Faith Musko at 724-853-7716 or fmusko@waynesburg.edu.

# # #

Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 331

b2ap3_thumbnail_special-olympics-logo.jpgWaynesburg University’s Criminal Justice Club will host a Special Olympics Meet-and-Greet event Saturday, April 18, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., in the Waynesburg University Gymnasium. 

In conjunction with the Special Olympics Greene County Program, the purpose of the event is to inform the community of the local program and the benefits of participating. The two organizations welcome all prospective Special Olympics athletes, parents and individuals looking to volunteer at Special Olympics-sponsored events. 

The event will include demonstrations of sports the program will offer, testimonials from athletes and coaches as well as sign-ups for those interested in getting involved. 

“The meet-and-greet is a combined effort by criminal justice students, communication students and Waynesburg University alumni who share the vision of bringing training and competition to our Special Olympic athletes in Greene County,” said James Tanda, instructor of criminal justice at Waynesburg University and member of the Special Olympics Greene County Board.

The Criminal Justice Club, which resurrected the Special Olympics Greene County Program last year, hopes to gain athletes from the area who are committed to breaking down the barriers that exclude people with intellectual disabilities. 

“For the past two years, Waynesburg University’s Criminal Justice Club students have embraced the Special Olympics with energy and passion,” said Tanda. “Many have taken the freezing cold Polar Plunge and others are planning on running in the Law Enforcement Torch Run in our continued effort to raise money and awareness for the Special Olympics in our community.”

Members of the Criminal Justice Club as well as additional students from the University will volunteer at the event. The volunteers anticipate helping prospective athletes understand the program as well as making connections with them. 

Special Olympics is something very near and dear to my heart,” said Taylor White, sophomore public relations major and volunteer for Special Olympics Greene County. “The program allows athletes to open up and showcase their talents. I am excited to be a part of this event and help put a smile on their faces.” 

For more information, contact Tanda at jtanda@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3371.

Special Olympics is a global movement that unleashes the human spirit through the transformative power and joy of sports, every day around the world. The organization empowers people with intellectual disabilities to become accepted and valued members of their communities, which leads to a more respectful and inclusive society for all.  

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 1012

Waynesburg University’s Criminal Justice and Social Sciences Department recently welcomed two guests who brought legends of the Pittsburgh Mob to life. 

Ed Reiser and Bruce Teitelbaum, longtime experts in the field of criminal justice, visited Waynesburg University to share insight into the world of organized crime, or mob activity, with criminal justice administration students. They began by debunking the myths that organized crime exists only in cities like Chicago and New York.

“Pittsburgh also had a very active organized crime family that dates back to the turn of the 19th century at least,” said Reiser, a retired special agent for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Criminal Investigation Division.

As members of the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF), Reiser and Teitelbaum spent years unraveling cases involving the Pittsburgh Mob. 

According to Reiser, the investigations leading to the successful prosecution of members of the Genovese organized crime family in Pittsburgh spanned seven years, from 1984 through 1990, and resulted in the indictments of more than 60 individuals for 182 separate violations of federal laws.

After decades of investigating organized crime, both men agree on the secret to ending mob violence.

“When you are conducting an investigation of organized crime, you have to have an insider,” Reiser said. “If you try to use outsiders to testify, fear is always there to keep people from cooperating with the government.”

Reiser graduated from Robert Morris College in 1975 and immediately began working in the Examination Division of the IRS. He worked in the Criminal Investigation Division of the IRS from 1977 until his retirement in 2010. He has received eight awards for superior performance at the IRS and has been awarded numerous other honors from the OCDETF and other organizations.

Teitelbaum, who graduated from Duquesne Law School in 1980, worked as a United States Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania until his retirement in 2012. In this position, he served as the lead attorney and section chief for the Organized Crime and Narcotics sections. Teitelbaum was also the lead attorney for the OCDETF, and he now practices law at a private firm.

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 809

Posted by on in News

b2ap3_thumbnail_monogram.jpgWaynesburg University, in conjunction with local, state and federal law enforcement as well as the University’s Criminal Justice Department and Department of Public Safety, will hold an Active Shooter Learning Drill Sunday, April 12.

“This learning exercise clearly integrates all aspects of the Waynesburg University mission of connecting faith, learning and service,” said Mary Cummings, the University’s vice president of Student Services. “While we pray that our community will never need to engage in this type of situation in a real-life event, we are committed to providing learning opportunities to prepare students. In this case, we are preparing criminal justice students for their futures as they have chosen a life of service in a public safety related role.”

Similar to other mock events held on campus, such as the Mock Crime Scene event and Sports Broadcasting Camp, the drill will be highly participative as an experiential learning opportunity. Approximately seventy criminal justice administration majors will have the opportunity to be a part of the exercise and learn alongside professionals who have also chosen a life of service in public safety.

“The Department of Criminal Justice Administration and Social Sciences is strategically staffed with faculty who can provide both academic learning to students as well as incorporate practical experience from their real-world positions in the field,” said Adam Jack, chair of the Department of Criminal Justice Administration and Social Sciences and current Greene County detective. “We are fortunate to have Criminal Justice Instructor James Tanda leading this exercise. He was previously the supervisory special agent and the team leader of the Special Response Team with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF).”

Other agents from the ATF’s Pittsburgh office, along with Pennsylvania State Police Waynesburg Barracks, Waynesburg Police Department, Greene County Sherriff’s Department, Greene County Emergency Services, Waynesburg Fire Department, Southwest Regional Medical Center and EMS Southwest will be participating in the drill.

“Waynesburg University is fortunate to have strong relationships with the various law enforcement and other agencies participating in the drill and is grateful for their willingness to join the drill,” Tanda said. “This is truly an example of a win-win scenario.  Our students have the opportunity to learn while the agencies have an opportunity to practice various protocols and cross-agency communication tactics they have already been trained to do.”

The drill will take place in Buhl Hall and will include the use of two external congregation points outside of the building. Emergency vehicles will be parked in front of Buhl Hall and in the Stover parking lot.  There will be several rounds of varying scenarios taking place with learning discussions interspersed between each.

“We want all students and the community to know in advance that this is just a drill in order to avoid concern when there are multiple emergency response vehicles and personnel on campus,” said Mike Humiston, director of Public Safety. “The area will be marked off with tape and signs. We will also be using e2campus, our campus security alert system, to remind students that this is only a drill during the event. We ask that everyone not involved in the drill please go about their normal business and not attempt to become spectators, take photographs or video the drill.”

# # #

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 620