Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in criminal justice administration news

b2ap3_thumbnail_special-olympics-logo.jpgWaynesburg University’s Criminal Justice Club will host a Special Olympics Meet-and-Greet event Saturday, April 18, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., in the Waynesburg University Gymnasium. 

In conjunction with the Special Olympics Greene County Program, the purpose of the event is to inform the community of the local program and the benefits of participating. The two organizations welcome all prospective Special Olympics athletes, parents and individuals looking to volunteer at Special Olympics-sponsored events. 

The event will include demonstrations of sports the program will offer, testimonials from athletes and coaches as well as sign-ups for those interested in getting involved. 

“The meet-and-greet is a combined effort by criminal justice students, communication students and Waynesburg University alumni who share the vision of bringing training and competition to our Special Olympic athletes in Greene County,” said James Tanda, instructor of criminal justice at Waynesburg University and member of the Special Olympics Greene County Board.

The Criminal Justice Club, which resurrected the Special Olympics Greene County Program last year, hopes to gain athletes from the area who are committed to breaking down the barriers that exclude people with intellectual disabilities. 

“For the past two years, Waynesburg University’s Criminal Justice Club students have embraced the Special Olympics with energy and passion,” said Tanda. “Many have taken the freezing cold Polar Plunge and others are planning on running in the Law Enforcement Torch Run in our continued effort to raise money and awareness for the Special Olympics in our community.”

Members of the Criminal Justice Club as well as additional students from the University will volunteer at the event. The volunteers anticipate helping prospective athletes understand the program as well as making connections with them. 

Special Olympics is something very near and dear to my heart,” said Taylor White, sophomore public relations major and volunteer for Special Olympics Greene County. “The program allows athletes to open up and showcase their talents. I am excited to be a part of this event and help put a smile on their faces.” 

For more information, contact Tanda at or 724-852-3371.

Special Olympics is a global movement that unleashes the human spirit through the transformative power and joy of sports, every day around the world. The organization empowers people with intellectual disabilities to become accepted and valued members of their communities, which leads to a more respectful and inclusive society for all.  

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or

Hits: 679

Waynesburg University’s Criminal Justice and Social Sciences Department recently welcomed two guests who brought legends of the Pittsburgh Mob to life. 

Ed Reiser and Bruce Teitelbaum, longtime experts in the field of criminal justice, visited Waynesburg University to share insight into the world of organized crime, or mob activity, with criminal justice administration students. They began by debunking the myths that organized crime exists only in cities like Chicago and New York.

“Pittsburgh also had a very active organized crime family that dates back to the turn of the 19th century at least,” said Reiser, a retired special agent for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Criminal Investigation Division.

As members of the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF), Reiser and Teitelbaum spent years unraveling cases involving the Pittsburgh Mob. 

According to Reiser, the investigations leading to the successful prosecution of members of the Genovese organized crime family in Pittsburgh spanned seven years, from 1984 through 1990, and resulted in the indictments of more than 60 individuals for 182 separate violations of federal laws.

After decades of investigating organized crime, both men agree on the secret to ending mob violence.

“When you are conducting an investigation of organized crime, you have to have an insider,” Reiser said. “If you try to use outsiders to testify, fear is always there to keep people from cooperating with the government.”

Reiser graduated from Robert Morris College in 1975 and immediately began working in the Examination Division of the IRS. He worked in the Criminal Investigation Division of the IRS from 1977 until his retirement in 2010. He has received eight awards for superior performance at the IRS and has been awarded numerous other honors from the OCDETF and other organizations.

Teitelbaum, who graduated from Duquesne Law School in 1980, worked as a United States Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania until his retirement in 2012. In this position, he served as the lead attorney and section chief for the Organized Crime and Narcotics sections. Teitelbaum was also the lead attorney for the OCDETF, and he now practices law at a private firm.

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or

Hits: 561

Posted by on in News

b2ap3_thumbnail_monogram.jpgWaynesburg University, in conjunction with local, state and federal law enforcement as well as the University’s Criminal Justice Department and Department of Public Safety, will hold an Active Shooter Learning Drill Sunday, April 12.

“This learning exercise clearly integrates all aspects of the Waynesburg University mission of connecting faith, learning and service,” said Mary Cummings, the University’s vice president of Student Services. “While we pray that our community will never need to engage in this type of situation in a real-life event, we are committed to providing learning opportunities to prepare students. In this case, we are preparing criminal justice students for their futures as they have chosen a life of service in a public safety related role.”

Similar to other mock events held on campus, such as the Mock Crime Scene event and Sports Broadcasting Camp, the drill will be highly participative as an experiential learning opportunity. Approximately seventy criminal justice administration majors will have the opportunity to be a part of the exercise and learn alongside professionals who have also chosen a life of service in public safety.

“The Department of Criminal Justice Administration and Social Sciences is strategically staffed with faculty who can provide both academic learning to students as well as incorporate practical experience from their real-world positions in the field,” said Adam Jack, chair of the Department of Criminal Justice Administration and Social Sciences and current Greene County detective. “We are fortunate to have Criminal Justice Instructor James Tanda leading this exercise. He was previously the supervisory special agent and the team leader of the Special Response Team with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF).”

Other agents from the ATF’s Pittsburgh office, along with Pennsylvania State Police Waynesburg Barracks, Waynesburg Police Department, Greene County Sherriff’s Department, Greene County Emergency Services, Waynesburg Fire Department, Southwest Regional Medical Center and EMS Southwest will be participating in the drill.

“Waynesburg University is fortunate to have strong relationships with the various law enforcement and other agencies participating in the drill and is grateful for their willingness to join the drill,” Tanda said. “This is truly an example of a win-win scenario.  Our students have the opportunity to learn while the agencies have an opportunity to practice various protocols and cross-agency communication tactics they have already been trained to do.”

The drill will take place in Buhl Hall and will include the use of two external congregation points outside of the building. Emergency vehicles will be parked in front of Buhl Hall and in the Stover parking lot.  There will be several rounds of varying scenarios taking place with learning discussions interspersed between each.

“We want all students and the community to know in advance that this is just a drill in order to avoid concern when there are multiple emergency response vehicles and personnel on campus,” said Mike Humiston, director of Public Safety. “The area will be marked off with tape and signs. We will also be using e2campus, our campus security alert system, to remind students that this is only a drill during the event. We ask that everyone not involved in the drill please go about their normal business and not attempt to become spectators, take photographs or video the drill.”

# # #

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or

Hits: 509

b2ap3_thumbnail_monogram.jpgPartnering with forensic science training and consulting firm Forensic Pieces, Waynesburg University will host a forensic science training course for professionals from Monday, June 8, through Friday, June 12.

The purpose of the five-day course is to enhance the knowledge of crime scene investigators and law enforcement professionals looking to acquire skills in crime scene processing. The sessions are also open to college students interested in criminal justice or forensic science.

The hands-on course will demonstrate and elaborate on techniques that have been acquired in the field and will assist in developing new techniques in crime scene examinations.

“Participants will benefit by receiving top-notch training from an instructor with more than 40 years of experience,” said Adam Jack, chairperson for the Department of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences and assistant professor of criminal justice. “There is a wide variety of participants, ranging from lawyers to forensic science students to senior crime scene analysts to police officers.”

The course will be taught by Jan Johnson, who retired with more than four decades of experience in law enforcement and has taught numerous courses in the areas of both crime scene and bloodstain pattern interpretation in the United States and abroad, including South Africa, Brazil and Bermuda.

As an IAI certified senior crime scene analyst, Johnson specializes in numerous fields of forensic analysis including latent print processing, bloodstain pattern analysis, trajectory analysis and crime scene reconstruction.

After ten years with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Johnson made the transition to crime scene analysis. She worked for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement in Pensacola for more than twenty-two years. As a laboratory analyst and crime scene examiner, her field of experience includes detection, collection and preservation of physical evidence, bloodstain pattern interpretation, trajectory analysis, buried body and skeletal remains recovery, clandestine laboratories and other numerous procedures involving crime scene investigation.

Course topics for the event include:

  • Bloodstain Pattern: Terms and Documentation
  • Bluestar Forensics Blood Detection
  • Crime Scene Management
  • Documentation: Photography, Note Taking, Searching, Sketching, Measurements
  • Equipment and Safety
  • Evidence Detection, Documentation, Collection and Preservation
  • Physical Evidence Packaging
  • Report Writing and Courtroom Presentations

For more information or to register, visit

# # #

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or

Hits: 760

b2ap3_thumbnail_monogram.jpgBeginning in the fall of 2015, Waynesburg University will offer a new master’s degree in Criminal Investigation.

“The master’s degree in Criminal Investigation is a 30-credit program that will distinguish our University from many others in the region that offer graduate level courses beyond Criminal Justice, Criminology or Police Administration,” said James Tanda, instructor of criminal justice at Waynesburg University. 

Criminal Investigation is a 500 level graduate program for professionals and students who have completed the requisite undergraduate courses in Criminal Justice Administration or have comparable training, skills or professional experience relating to the field.

The program consists of courses such as Advanced Criminal Investigation, Advanced Crime Scene Investigation, Advanced Interview and Interrogation, Research in the Justice System and Effective Criminal Profiling. 

Students pursuing a master’s degree in Criminal Investigation will learn about ethical decision-making and leadership in the field as well as build upon their interview and interrogation skills.

“This unique blend of advanced level courses from each discipline creates an exclusive opportunity for students, police officers and other professionals in the field to obtain a Master’s Degree in Criminal Investigation, not offered anywhere outside of Waynesburg University,” said Tanda.

The Criminal Investigation courses will be offered at Waynesburg University’s main campus as well as the Southpointe, Monroeville and Seven Fields centers. Select courses can be completed online.

For more information, visit or contact Tanda at or Adam Jack, chairperson for the Criminal Justice and Social Sciences Department and assistant professor of criminal justice, at

# # #

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or

Hits: 1171