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Fourteen Waynesburg University early childhood education majors who are members of the University’s chapter of Kappa Delta Pi (KDP), an international honor society in education, will travel to Dallas, Texas, Thursday, Oct. 24 through Saturday, Oct. 26 to attend the 49th Biennial Convocation of KDP.

Educators and teacher candidates from across the United States and around the world will attend the conference’s professional development activities.

The conference will offer more than 150 educational sessions aimed for professional development and will include workshops on leadership or policy, research or action research and practice or instructional strategies.

Debra Clarke, chair of the Department of Education and assistant professor of education, and Yvonne Weaver, education department field placement coordinator and certification officer at the University, will accompany the students.

Clarke will present a workshop, “Capes aren’t just for super heroes: Using the teacher CAPE to support all learners.”
 
“During the workshop, I will introduce the participants to CAPE, a strategy that gives 21st century teachers the super powers to effectively plan instruction that supports the needs of all learners in the inclusive classroom,” Clarke said.

Students attending the conference include:

  • Jena Blissman, Chapter President a senior from Greensburg, Pa. (Greater Latrobe)
  • Morgan Brumbaugh, Chapter Vice President, a senior from Williamsburg, Pa. (Central High School)
  • Makalah Beazell, Chapter Secretary, a senior from Waynesburg, Pa. (West Greene High School)
  • Lauren Boscaljon, Chapter Treasurer, a senior from Waynesburg, Pa. (home school)
  • Kaitlyn Berkebile, Chapter Fundraising Co-Chair, a senior from Friedens, Pa. (Somerset Area Senior High School)
  • Shannon Falleroni, Chapter Fundraising Co-Chair, a senior from Washington, Pa. (Trinity High School)
  • Tanya Aul, a senior from Kane, Pa. (Kane Area High School)
  • Alyssa Crile, a senior from Washington, Pa. (Trinity High School)
  • Angele Hagy, a senior from Pittsburgh, Pa. (Mount Lebanon High School)
  • Ali Hulsey, a senior from Bakersfield, Calif. (Garces Memorial High School)
  • Stephanie Sapic, a senior from Washington, Pa. (Trinity High School)
  • Stephanie Stancliffe, a senior from Lower Burrell, Pa. (Burrell High School)
  • Hannah Szymanik, a senior from Mount Holly Springs, Pa. (Boiling Springs High School)
  • Chelsea Watson, a senior from Jeannette, Pa. (Jeannette High School)

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Tagged in: education news
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The Pittsburgh Project's purpose to develop servant leaders and uphold the dignity of vulnerable homeowners has much in common with Waynesburg University's mission of educating students through faith, learning and serving.

For several years, Waynesburg University has worked to build a partnership with The Pittsburgh Project, a nonprofit community development organization committed to meeting the needs of the Pittsburgh community. Each semester, Waynesburg students are given the opportunity to serve extensively with The Project in programs such as tutoring, work camps and community garden.

“The Pittsburgh Project is striving to provide for its community through education and home improvements for the elderly, widows and those with disabilities who fall 150 percent below the poverty level,” said Sarah Brandstetter, coordinator of Waynesburg University's Bonner Scholar Program.

This year, five Waynesburg students and a recent alumnus are dedicating their summers to the cause, serving as worksite liaisons from the beginning of June to mid-August.

Those working with The Project include: Kimber Blair, a junior interactive design major from New Castle, Pa; Darartu Boyer, a senior early childhood education major from Columbia, Pa; Ethan Hacker, a junior biblical ministry studies (children and youth) major from Butler, Pa; Blake McCarty, a sophomore business management major from Frisco, Tx; Esteban Saldi a 2012 human services alumnus from La Paz, Bolivia and Steven Snow, a sophomore criminal justice administration major from Butler, Pa.

“I decided to serve at the Pittsburgh Project this summer so that I could minister to people in my home city,” Hacker said. “I like working hands on and doing labor. I am excited to work with the homeowners and other groups to make the city a little bit better every day.”

Dave Calvario, Director of the Center for Service Leadership, and Brandstetter have worked alongside students within The Project throughout the years and regularly encourage students to take the next step when it comes to serving others.

“Sarah Brandstetter and Dave Calvario have always been supportive and influential in my life, and they are the ones who helped me decide to work with The Project my first summer,” Blair said.

Proud to be part of an organization that has genuine interest in the people of Pittsburgh, Blair reflected on how God has opened her eyes to the need in the area.

“There's a need to care for vulnerable, sometimes neglected, homeowners who are unable to continue the upkeep on their own homes,” she said. “There is a need for positive influences in the lives of the youth. There is a need for reconciliation between gangs and other groups.”

With all of the need in the Pittsburgh area, and around the world, there is an even bigger need for individuals like these Waynesburg students and alumnus who have given their summers in order to serve God and make a difference for those around them.


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Pennsylvania's Secretary of Education Ron Tomalis recently announced that Ryan Devlin, a 2007 Waynesburg University secondary English education alumnus, is one of the 12 finalists for Pennsylvania's 2013 “Teacher of the Year.”

“These finalists for Teacher of the Year, and many of the professionals in our schools, are dedicated to improving the learning environment for every student and inspiring students to reach for excellence,” Tomalis said. “Teachers play a crucial role in the lives of their students and, as such, they have the responsibility of preparing students for a successful future, both academically and personally.”

The finalists must also be prepared to effectively carry out the duties of the state's Teacher of the Year, which includes being the Pennsylvania's nominee for National Teacher of the Year.

“I truly believe that many of our nation's most passionate and innovative educators are working in Pennsylvania schools,” Tomalis said. “The teachers who have been chosen as finalists for Teacher of the Year are proof of that.”

Devlin is the youngest educator to have been nominated for this award, which comes as no surprise considering the fact that Devlin has known since the age of 8 what he wanted to do with the rest of his life.

“I spent a lot of my childhood and adolescent years daydreaming about the type of teacher I wanted to become,” he said. “Teaching seemed like the perfect outlet for my creativity, and I wanted to do something that would enable me to make a difference in the world.”

After graduating from Waynesburg, Devlin was hired as an English teacher at Brockway Area High School in his hometown of Brockway, Pa. Devlin teaches British Literature, Creative Writing, Digital Media and Computer Science. He also serves as the advisor to the senior high gifted program.

In 2009, Devlin completed his master's degree in Education at California University of Pennsylvania. The following year he was hired as the chair of the English Department at Brockway Area School District. On top of teaching and coaching cross country (a program he created at Brockway in 2008), he now oversees the curriculum, plans professional development and analyzes student data for the English Department.

He also plays an active role in introducing new technology to both students and staff at Brockway. Devlin strives to develop 21st century learning skills through creating a classroom environment that fosters creativity, collaboration, communication, innovation, critical thinking and problem solving. As a result, Devlin received the 2009 and 2012 Pennsylvania State Education Association's Innovative Teaching Grant.

The 12 finalists for Pennsylvania's 2013 “Teacher of the Year” were nominated by students, parents, their colleagues and members of their community who wished to recognize their achievements in and outside the classroom. The winner will be announced in December.


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Waynesburg University Stover Scholars recently visited U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor and Swiss Ambassador Manuel Sager in Washington, D.C.
Justice Sotomayor urged the students to pursue their passions while contributing to the broader community. Sotomayor hinted that one person in the room might one day become a member of the Supreme Court. Sotomayor emphasized that the opportunity to serve should be recognized as a privilege and that it is worthwhile to give of oneself to fulfill his or her vocation.
 
The Stover Scholars, chosen for their interest in the relationship between the U.S. Constitution and Christian Ethics, asked Sotomayor questions about the role of her own experiences, her faith and the personal challenges of being in the public eye.
 
"When people are presented with the privilege of serving the public, they have an obligation to take it," she said.
 
"Meeting Justice Sotomayor was more than memorable to me," said Chase Ayers, a pre-law major from Charleroi, Pa. "Hearing her words conveyed a special meaning that I could not have received from a book."
 
The group then visited Ambassador Sager at the Swiss Embassy. They discussed Switzerland's system of government, strong economic foundation, neutral foreign policy, and Swiss-American relations.
 
"Hearing about Switzerland from the Swiss perspective was unique," said Jeremy Hinkle, a freshman history major from Washington, Pa.
 
The students then met several prominent Washington government officials and scholars at the historic City Tavern Club in Georgetown. Thomas R. Johnson, a partner at the Pittsburgh law firm K&L Gates, spoke on the attributes of strong leadership.
 
“Mr. Johnson reminded us that when we are called to fulfill a duty, it is our civic obligation to do so,” said Daniel Czajkowski, a criminal justice and political science major from Frederick, Md.
 
Reflecting on the trip, Zander Shashura, a business major from Fredericktown, Pa., said, “On this trip, we were surrounded by people who are carrying out what they and the Stover Program preach.” Shashura continued, “Talking to them and listening to the stories they have to tell of their own lives gives us all examples to follow as we aspire to be leaders and change the world around us.”
 
Zachary Mason, a secondary education major from Waynesburg, said, "Our trip to D.C. was a truly remarkable experience that I will never forget. Not every person has the privilege to meet a Supreme Court Justice, meet a foreign Ambassador and have dinner with so many distinguished individuals."
 
Dr. Lawrence M. Stratton, director of the Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership, said, "I was proud of the Stover Scholars as they conversed with Justice Sotomayor, Ambassador Sager, Attorney Johnson, and the other individuals who are making a difference for civilization. I hope that the Stover Scholars will aspire to follow in their footsteps and that the officials will cherish memories of meeting Waynesburg University students."
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Maya Angelou once said that “Any book that helps a child form a habit of reading, to make reading one of his deep and continuing needs, is good for him.” Without encouragement to read, some children may grow up never knowing the joy of becoming lost in a good book. To foster this growth, the senior Waynesburg University Bonner Scholars recently donated 400 contemporary children's books to the Reading Clinic, an annual spring event hosted by the Department of Education for local children.

To complete the project required by each Bonner Scholar class, students must identify a need in the community by impacting and educating the members. For Leeann Danley, a senior Bonner Scholar and elementary special education major, the need was obvious.

Observing how empty the shelves were in the Reading Clinic, Danley proposed that for their project, the senior Bonner Scholars should raise money and purchase books to contribute to the cause. Her classmates were quick to agree, due to the impact of the donation.

“I was astonished by the response that I received for this project,” Danley said. “So many of the senior Bonners understood the need and took action.”

For several weekends in October and November 2011, the senior Bonner Scholars collected monetary donations from patrons at Walmart and Giant Eagle. As they were collecting the gifts, they were able to tell the community members about the need for a literacy program and the need for the books.

Through their efforts, more than $1,000 was raised. With this money, the group scattered to different libraries and book stores in the area to purchase a variety of books. They attempted to find multiple copies to give to children who participate in the clinic. In total, 400 books were added to the Reading Clinic library.

Dr. Fran Boyd, associate professor of education and director of the Reading Clinic, appreciates the additional books and the continued support of her dream.

“At the clinic, we give the children tutorial skills, but we also teach them to learn to love it,” Boyd said. “In a world of distractions, we want them to pick up a book.”

Each book is marked with a label indicating that it belongs to the Reading Clinic, but an additional insert was included to honor the students that worked diligently to provide for the community. A thank you to the senior Bonner class is visible to all who read the donated books.

Debra Clarke, chair of the department of education, thanked the students profusely for their generous support.

“Their generous donation of many, many new books for the clinic is a wonderful gift and legacy,” Clarke said. “Long after they leave Waynesburg University, children in this community will be reading the books that they have donated. The gifts will help others learn to teach and will help others learn to love to read.”


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