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b2ap3_thumbnail_Jill-Sunday.jpgJill Sunday, director of the Writing Center at Waynesburg University, has recently been accepted as a Book Reviewer for The Los Angeles Review of Books (LAR).

Established in 2003, LAR is a literary journal that is published twice a year in print and monthly online. LAR publishes fiction, nonfiction, poetry, translations, interviews and book reviews that mirror Los Angeles itself: sprawling, unexpected and unpredictable.

As a book reviewer, Sunday will review prose titles for LAR in a freelance capacity.

“I get to do what I love most: read and tell others how I think each particular book fits into our human awareness,” said Sunday.

The opportunity became available to Sunday after a friend who reviews for LAR mentioned that the literary journal was in search for additional reviewers. After submitting her curriculum vitae and a writing sample, Sunday was asked to begin reviewing books.

Having already submitted her first review, she is excited to use her extensive English background to facilitate communication between other writers.

“I am an avid reader and writer, and one of my teaching focuses is creative nonfiction writing,” said Sunday. “I am very interested in reading and discussing what others have written. Stories are our human heartbeat.”

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Tagged in: English news LAR
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b2ap3_thumbnail_1-19-Richard-Pierce.jpgThree poems written by Waynesburg University’s Dr. Richard Pierce have been selected for publication in Image journal. Pierce, an assistant professor of English at the University, submitted poems entitled “Go Gentle,” “Father Rodney,” and “Salt of Sodom,” all of which will appear in a future issue of Image.

Image, an internationally-read quarterly, features artistic works grounded in religious faith or featuring spiritual grappling. Pierce submitted his three poems because he felt they aligned with the publication’s focus on faith and art.

“Being published in Image means very much to me, and I am very thankful for the opportunity,” said Pierce. “It has been a dream of mine for quite a while.  If you are a writer of faith, you want to be published in Image.”

The poems were submitted after Pierce sought revisions and feedback from a number of colleagues, both at the University and outside of it. He believes his experiences writing poetry and getting published have a direct influence on the tools and skills he teaches creative writing students at Waynesburg.

“This publication helps me to teach students the important lesson that perseverance and patience are imperative to becoming a good writer,” said Pierce.

Pierce also published a poetry chapbook, “The Book of Mankey,” in 2015 and has had upwards of a dozen other poems published in various poetry collections and reviews.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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If you ask senior Luisa Singletary what the greatest thing is about Waynesburg University, she is likely to tell you it’s the school’s ability to turn passions into careers and futures.

When she began her education at Waynesburg University, Singletary was unsure about the direction of her career path. But after a short period of time, during which she utilized the skillsets and connections of her classes and professors, she was certain she wanted to become a writer. Her passion for writing overflowed into her every educational and professional pursuit, leading her to a major in English and professional writing.

Now, she believes the skills and lessons she has learned throughout her spectrum of writing courses have set her up for possible jobs in any number of fields.

After three semesters at the University, Singletary chose to add a Communication minor. The Department of Communication was unfamiliar territory for her, but in a good way – she soon learned that her class work in her communication courses was often used for real-world journalistic or public relations pursuits.

Through multiple internships and a varied course load, Singletary has enough professional experience to require a tiny font size on her résumé. She has completed tasks like developing grant templates, offering public relations work to businesses, becoming a published writer and copy editor and experiencing multiple roles related to TV production.

“Between the preparation I’ve gotten from my English major and the professional opportunities I’ve received through my Communication minor, I truly feel prepared for whatever line of work I choose,” she said.

While Singletary’s undergraduate success is unmistakably a result of her own passion and ambition, she is also quick to mention the things that led her to Waynesburg and how they have played a part in her achievements. She cites dedicated professors, generous financial aid and a Christian community as having benefited her both in college and in the long run.

Just a half-semester away from graduating, Singletary is grateful to discover she’ll leave college with far more than a degree. She has, in fact, acquired nearly every tool, skill and quality necessary for success in the future, because Waynesburg University has helped her to direct her love for writing toward what is sure to be a successful life.

Singletary’s Waynesburg experience has led her to this advice for her fellow students: “Pray. Breathe. Trust. God has a plan for all of us.”

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b2ap3_thumbnail_BobRandolph.jpgDr. Robert Randolph, chairperson for Waynesburg University’s Department of English and Foreign Languages, was recently invited to serve as pastor-in-residence at Gettysburg Lutheran Seminary in Gettysburg, Pa.

Randolph spent the week of October 12 at the oldest Lutheran seminary in the Americas, where he preached during three chapel services. In addition, Randolph visited classes and had the opportunity to interact with the seminary community.

“I am honored to have been selected to be this year’s pastor-in-residence at such a distinguished seminary,” said Randolph. “In doing so, I am the latest in a list of invitees that dates back 33 years.”

In 1982, Dr. Oscar V. Carlson established an annual fund to invite a parish pastor to preach to the Seminary community and visit classes. Reflecting the characteristics of Carlson, the pastors who are selected each year must be considered an effective parish pastor, a preacher of excellence and a life-long scholar.

As a pastor at a Presbyterian Church in Greensboro, Randolph states that he was selected because he is a man who wears many hats.

“The original impulse to select me for the residency came from a poem I sent to the Seminary Ridge Review, a publication of the Seminary,” said Randolph. “The selection committee became interested in how one could write published poetry, be a department chair at a university and be pastor at a church. They were interested in knowing how I balance those things and how they informed each other.”

Randolph was able to incorporate his work as a published poet into his sermons he preached to the Seminary. This residency was especially important to him because it combined his lifelong love for poetry and pastoring into one impactful experience for both him and the Seminary community.

“I am sincere about loving poetry and trusting in God, and that sincerity, along with telling true stories about my church work in the small congregation I serve, led people to see that my heart is pretty much where I say it is. With me, what you see is what you get,” said Randolph.

During the same week, 21 Waynesburg University students served nearby at Gettysburg National Military Park and Daniel Lady Farm. The students were able to attend one of Randolph’s chapel services at the Seminary and witness his teachings to the community.

Gettysburg Seminary is a graduate and professional theological school of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, preparing outreach oriented pastors, mission leaders and public theologians for the 21st century and world.

The Seminary provides leaders and scholars with biblical, theological and practical insight in a robust integrative learning environment.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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The Department of English and Foreign Languages at Waynesburg University will hold a Creative Writing Workshop for high school students in grades nine through twelve Friday, Nov. 13, at 10 a.m. with check-in at 9:30 a.m. The deadline for registration is Friday, Oct. 9.

The event will feature Julia Paganelli, a poet and Waynesburg University alumna who is currently pursuing a master’s degree at the University of Arkansas.

The goal of the Creative Writing Workshop is to give high school students the opportunity to engage their imaginations and strengthen their writing skills through writing exercises provided by workshop facilitators.

Activities will include two workshops facilitated by Department of English and Foreign Languages faculty and students. During the student workshops, teachers will attend a workshop facilitated by Paganelli. Following the workshops, there will be a luncheon and student reading. The cost per student is $5. 

Paganelli is the author of a poetry chapbook, Blush Less, which focuses on the lives of young women in Appalachia. Other recent publications include poetry in Hobart, The Madison Review, BOAAT, Connotation Press and The Chautauqua Literary Journal.

Her work with the Bonner Program at Waynesburg greatly influenced her writing about Appalachia, as did her work with the Greene County Food Security Partnership.

Paganelli holds a bachelor’s degree in creative writing from Waynesburg University.

For more information, contact Amy Randolph at 724-852-3430 or by email at arandolp@waynesburg.edu.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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