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b2ap3_thumbnail_9-20-Mock-Crime-Scene-Workshop.jpgWaynesburg University’s Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science will host a fall Mock Crime Scene Workshop Saturday, Nov. 12, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The workshop, hosted in conjunction with the University’s Office of Admissions, provides high school students with the opportunity to analyze crime scenes and collect and process evidence alongside Waynesburg University students and faculty, as well as local experts in the field.

“The Mock Crime Scene weekend gives the current students, faculty and staff the opportunity to meet prospective students and show them, through experience, what they can expect by attending Waynesburg University,” said Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science. “Our goal is to excite them about our programs, the opportunities available to them and assist them with making lasting connections with our community.”

Students who attend will have hands-on training from skilled experts in the forensic sciences and have the opportunity to utilize those practices by applying them at a crime scene. The variety of sessions offered will help prospective students decide on pursuing a career in forensic science or criminal justice.

For more information or to register, contact the Office of Admissions at 800-225-7393.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Posted by on in Internships

b2ap3_thumbnail_Melanie-Kauffman.jpgMelanie Kauffman might have only spent one year so far at Waynesburg University, but the junior forensic science transfer student has wasted no time benefiting from her Waynesburg professors, education and experiences.

“Since I have only had two semesters at Waynesburg, I’ve only taken a handful of classes, however, in various ways, all of the classes I have taken are applicable to my work and have prepared me for this laboratory experience,” said Kauffman.

The laboratory experience she speaks of has been a three month internship as an inclusion analyst in the quality control laboratory of North American Hoganas in Hollsopple, Pennsylvania, also known as the Stony Creek plant.

Hoganas is an international company known for making a wide variety of products, such as metal powders, alloys for surface protection of exposed surfaces, brazing filler metals and pastes, as well as inductors and electric drive systems. North American Hoganas is one of three branches in North America and specializes mostly in the mass production of powdered metals.

Kauffman learned of the internship opportunity through her father, who works in the Maintenance Department at North American Hoganas.

“One night at school, I called home to talk with my parents and I had mentioned to them that I was looking for a summer internship,” said Kauffman. “And it turned out that very day my dad had a meeting where they explained to employees that they were accepting internship applications for the Stony Creek plant.”

Upon submitting her application materials, Kauffman was invited to tour the plant where she completed standard paperwork, discussed the specifics of her potential job and took a critical thinking test. This visit was in lieu of a traditional interview, which is standard for most internship applicants.

“They merely took me on the basis of my resume,” said Kauffman.

Kauffman was able to build her academic resume and expand her general wealth of knowledge by enrolling in Dr. Chad Keyes’ organic chemistry class last year. A class, she said, that prepared her the most for her internship.

“Through his energetic lectures, I was able to learn a vast array of chemical reactions, molecular structures and how various microscopes can aid in meticulous analyzation,” said Kauffman.

Kauffman’s internship has been equally rewarding and challenging. Her favorite part, though, is having the opportunity to eat lunch with her dad every day and having a small glimpse into his role at the plant.

Additionally, she has become part of the lab’s family and learned various methodologies for her work.

“I have constantly improved my meticulous analyzation of the inclusions and preparation processes,” said Kauffman. “This is something that I think will be very beneficial in my future.”

Oddly enough, these same benefits have also been the most challenging for her, in addition to learning the wide range of testing and machinery in the lab.

All in all, Kauffman’s experience at North American Hoganas will no doubt propel her into her final years of study at Waynesburg and beyond.

“By obtaining this laboratory experience and making these connections with the wonderful people at North American Hoganas, I have taken a step forward to polishing my resume, gaining hands-on experience and acquiring skills that can only be obtained on a day-to-day basis that will further aid me in my future endeavors,” said Kauffman.

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Posted by on in Alumni

b2ap3_thumbnail_7-11-ACS-Regional-Mtg-JK.jpgIn a few short weeks, Jelena Kyle, recent forensic science alumna, will be continuing her education across the Atlantic Ocean. Kyle will be pursuing a master’s degree in forensic science at Northumbria University in the United Kingdom.

Kyle first learned of Northumbria through Dr. Evonne Balduaff, associate professor of chemistry and chair of the Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science, who, at the time, was exploring a future study abroad program with the school.

“We would always joke that I was going to go there for graduate school, but I don’t think either of us thought that one day I actually would,” said Kyle.

Baldauff and Michael Cipoletti, assistant professor of forensic science, once visited Northumbria and upon their return, shared how amazing it was as a school. This was when Kyle made a decision that Northumbria was where she wanted to continue her education.

Kyle’s professors at Waynesburg have helped shape her into the person she has become today. In addition to Baldauff and Cipoletti, Kelly Wilczynski, chemical hygiene officer and safety coordinator, and Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science, have become personal and academic influencers to Kyle.

In addition to being her professor, Baldauff was her research advisor and saw firsthand the amount of time and dedication that Kyle devoted to her studies in the chemistry lab.

“I am surprised that she didn’t get sick of me for how much time I spent up there on the fifth floor of Stewart Hall,” said Kyle. “The joke was that I was either going to become the mascot or that I should just bring my mattress and move in.”

Musko was Kyle’s biggest cheerleader and the one who pushed her harder every day to do her best. Another friend and Kyle coined the phrase, “Musko Wednesdays,” which became a time when they held conversations with Musko in her office about anything from school to politics to TV.

“It might not seem like much, but it was honestly one of the biggest stress relievers for me,” said Kyle.

Kyle credits the structure of Waynesburg’s forensic science curriculum for helping her with choosing a career. At Waynesburg, students experience all disciplines in the forensic science field rather than being forced to choose a specific discipline from the start.

“Not many colleges other than Waynesburg offer this,” said Kyle. “I was able to study a little bit of every division so I would be better suited to then pick what it was I wanted to do as a career.”

Indeed, that is how Kyle decided that she wanted to become a latent fingerprint examiner and work for the counterfeiting division of the Secret Service.

In September, Kyle will begin her coursework at Northumbria, and she is very eager to do so.

“I think I am most excited about going to a different country for my degree,” said Kyle. “I am going to learn so much over there, not just from my new professors, but from the culture and area.”

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The Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science at Waynesburg University will hold its annual Science Day Thursday, Dec. 10. Organized in conjunction with the Office of Admissions and the American Chemical Society, local high school students and University applicants have the opportunity to spend the day as a science student.

Intended to excite high school students about science, participants will enjoy hands-on activities and lectures by students and faculty as well as demonstrations. A question-and-answer session will be offered to provide prospective students with the opportunity to ask undergraduates about the college experience.

Special presentations in chemistry, biology and forensic science will occur in addition to a tour of the marine biology lab, all hosted by professors and students.

Dr. Evonne Baldauff, chair of the Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science and associate professor of chemistry, believes high school students will benefit from attending Science Day.

“Science Day is important because it gives high school students the opportunity to see firsthand what it is like to study science at a college level,” said Baldauff. “While on campus, students will interact with faculty and current undergraduates and experience the exciting programs we have in the sciences at Waynesburg University.”

The University will also host an additional Science Day event for prospective students during the spring semester, Thursday, April 14.

For more information, contact Baldauff at ebaldauf@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3617.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Waynesburg University’s Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science and Department of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences are teaming up for a community outreach event at Jefferson-Morgan Elementary School Thursday, Oct. 22.

All fourth graders at the school will have the opportunity to participate in four workshops covering information about the importance of shoeprints in criminal investigation. A group of University juniors and seniors from the Forensic Science and Criminal Justice clubs will lead each workshop.

The elementary students will rotate through the 15-minute workshops, which are entitled, “Class Characteristics of Footwear,” “Individual Characteristics of Footwear,” “Footwear Recovery and Lifting” and “Analysis of Crime Scene Footwear Impressions.” Under the guise of investigating a case about a lunch thief, participants will learn about why footwear impression evidence is important, how to collect imprints and how to analyze them to identify suspects or culprits.

Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science at the University, emphasizes that if students want to pursue a future in criminal justice, they will be required to master a wide variety of skills.

“To obtain a career in investigation requires an individual to wear many hats which all require an inquisitive nature,” said Musko. “This inquisitive nature involves both analytical and critical thinking skills, which is a necessary part of student development. By giving the students at Jefferson-Morgan a crime scene to solve, we are giving them a fun and thrilling way to enhance these skills.”

For more information, contact Faith Musko at 724-853-7716 or fmusko@waynesburg.edu.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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