Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in forensic science news

Posted by on in Alumni

Kelly-Brady.jpgKelly Brady, 2011 Forensic Science 

Forensic technician at the Philadelphia Medical Examiner’s Office in Philadelphia, Pa.

Working a full-time job while earning a master’s degree may be difficult for some, but for Kelly Brady, juggling both came easily.

A 2011 graduate of Waynesburg University, the former forensic science major currently works as a forensic technician at the Philadelphia Medical Examiner’s Office, where she performs autopsies, extracts fluids and organs from decedents for toxicology, takes photographs of decedents and releases them to funeral homes. Just recently, she earned her master’s degree in forensic medicine from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. 

Reflecting on her time at Waynesburg University, the former vice president of Waynesburg’s Gamma Sigma Epsilon, a chemistry honorary society, chapter credits her alma mater for preparing her for life after college.

“Waynesburg University gave me countless opportunities to network with people in my field and to gain as much knowledge as possible,” said Brady. “I feel that all of the coursework and extracurricular activities at Waynesburg were beneficial and prepared me for the workforce because I was able to see what my field was really like.” 

 

Hits: 89

b2ap3_thumbnail_Monogram Small.jpgThe Waynesburg University Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science and the Office of Admissions will host the fall Mock Crime Scene Workshop Saturday, Nov. 8, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

The Mock Crime Scene Workshop provides high school students the opportunity to analyze crime scenes and collect and process evidence alongside Waynesburg University students and faculty, as well as experts in the field. 

Students will gain hands-on training from skilled experts in the forensic sciences and have the opportunity to utilize those practices by applying them at a crime scene. The vast array of workshops offered will help students to determine if they can see a forensic science or criminal justice career in their futures. 

“The Mock Crime Scene weekend gives the current students, faculty and staff the opportunity to meet prospective students and show them, through experience, what they can expect by attending Waynesburg University,” said Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science. “Our goal is to excite them about our programs, the opportunities available to them and assist them with making lasting connections with our community.” 

Every year, typically more than 40 current high school sophomores, juniors and seniors attend the event. 

To register, or for more information, contact the Office of Admissions at 800-225-7393. 

# # #

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 940

b2ap3_thumbnail_Mike-Cipoletti.jpgWaynesburg University will host its annual Crime Scene Investigation summer camp Sunday, June 22, through Friday, June 27, on the campus of Waynesburg University. Participants will gain valuable insight into the field of forensic science through experiential learning and strategically planned activities.

All workshops are interconnected through a series of evidence and crime scenes, designed with a hands-on approach to learning. Students will learn how to properly collect, preserve and analyze evidence. 

During this six-day, five-night experience, students are given the opportunity to study with experts in forensic science as well as professionals from various fields including state and federal agencies. This year, camp topics will include scene processing, interviewing and interrogation techniques, fingerprinting, DNA profiling, Hazmat evidence collection, surveillance and search warrant execution techniques.

This year’s camp will also feature a new workshop titled Forensic Analyzation of Evidence, better known as Forensic Science. Students will have the opportunity to analyze evidence as illustrated in popular crime drama television series.

“By adding this component, we would like to give students the opportunity to conduct a few of these tests themselves in order to obtain a real-life perspective on how much time, energy and knowledge it takes to be in this career field,” said Faith Musko, camp advisor and instructor of forensic science at Waynesburg University.

Students interested in forensic science and criminal justice will train with special agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Bureau of Alcohol and the Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), as well as crime scene investigators from the Pennsylvania State Police and other municipal police departments. The camp will enable students to enhance their knowledge and understanding of forensic topics, as well as allow them to make valuable connections with professionals and fellow peers in the field.

Individuals entering 11th grade, 12th grade or who are spring 2014 high school graduates are eligible to attend the camp.

Participating Waynesburg University faculty include: 

•Mike Cipoletti, camp director, director of the Forensic Science Program and assistant professor of forensic science at Waynesburg University, previously worked for the Pennsylvania State Police Crime Lab. He served as a forensic scientist and lab system quality specialist in chemistry and drug identification.

•John Mcllwain, camp advisor and instructor of criminal justice at Waynesburg University, has taught for 16 years. He began his professional career as a U.S. Army Military Police Officer in Germany. Mcllwain left the military in 1977 and became a Special Agent with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. He conducted investigations of the Federal Firearms Laws for 11 years.

•Faith Musko, camp advisor and instructor of forensic science at Waynesburg University, is a former toxicologist and forensic chemist with AIT Laboratories in Indianapolis, Ind. She is a member of the American Academy of Forensic Scientists, the American Chemical Society and the Society of Forensic Toxicologists.

•Adam Jack, camp co-creator, chair of the Department of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences and assistant professor of forensic science at Waynesburg University, is a former forensic detective with the Westmoreland County District Attorney’s Office and police officer in Rostraver Township, Pa. He is a Certified Senior Crime Scene Analyst through the International Association for Identification and has testified as an expert in Crime Scene Investigation and fingerprints.

•Marietta Wright, camp workshop presenter and assistant professor of biology at Waynesburg University, previously conducted molecular biology research in type I diabetes at the University of Pittsburgh. Her main areas of interest are cell and molecular biology, genetics, DNA profiling and scientific teaching.

To register, visit csicamp.waynesburg.edu or call 724-225-7393.

###

Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 971

Posted by on in Achievements

b2ap3_thumbnail_Monogram Small.jpgThe Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science at Waynesburg University held its annual Science Day Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013. Organized in conjunction with the Office of Admissions and the American Chemical Society, local high school students and University applicants had the opportunity to spend the day as a science student. Special presentations in chemistry, biology and forensic science occurred in addition to a tour of the marine biology lab, all hosted by professors and students.

Hits: 604

On October 21, 2013, Waynesburg University students enrolled in instructor of criminal justice James Tanda’s terrorism class welcomed Edward Bender, a visiting guest speaker from the National Center for Explosives Training and Research in Huntsville, Ala.

More than 100 Waynesburg University students from classes including terrorism, criminal investigations, criminal justice, forensic science, criminalistics, criminal law, white collar crime, interview & interrogation and private security attended Bender’s instructional presentation involving crime scene investigation, laboratory analysis, evidence collection and case studies globally spanning the last 25 years.

“Waynesburg students could see that expertise come through with detailed and animated descriptions of Bender’s firsthand accounts of examining the World Trade Center truck bomb and the Oklahoma City federal building bombing,” said Tanda.

Tanda and Bender worked closely together for more than 22 years in the field on bomb scenes and in explosives investigative training environments. They continue to stay close to the explosives law enforcement community as they are both contracted subject matter experts at the National Center for Explosives Training and Research.

Bender earned his bachelor’s degree from Saint Mary’s College in 1979.  His career in forensic chemistry began that same year in the Instrumental Analysis Section of the FBI Laboratory with an emphasis on explosives and trace evidence examination. He continued his career at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives National Laboratory in 1990, specializing in the chemical analysis of explosives, explosive effects and trace evidence.  After 34 years of service to the Department of Justice as an expert in his field, Bender retired from ATF’s Washington National Laboratory in 2012.

Although Bender worked on hundreds of criminal investigations at the federal, state and international levels, some of his more notable investigations included the bombing of the Embassy and Marine Corps barracks in Beirut, Lebanon, the attempted assassination of president Ronald Reagan, the “Unibomber" serial bombing case, the bombing of the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires and the 1996 TWA Flight 800 investigations.

During his Waynesburg University presentation, Bender touched on many of these historic cases with first-hand accounts and details not found in history books.

Bender has 26 peer reviewed scientific publications including contributions to three books. He has taught numerous post-blast investigation courses and has given lectures in nearly every state in the country.  He has also taught explosives investigations throughout the world including international law enforcement academies in Africa, Hungary and Thailand.

He currently teaches more than 20 classes a year for the homemade explosives course at the National Center for Explosives Training and Research as well as a pipe bomb analysis course at the Canadian Police College in Ottawa, Ontario, and the Western Regional CPC in Chilliwack, British Colombia. 

# # #

Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 1006