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b2ap3_thumbnail_9-9-Robinette-chair-elect.jpgTeresa Robinette, coordinator of student enrollment and professional development for Waynesburg University’s Graduate and Professional Studies program, was recently named chair-elect of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing’s (AACN) Graduate Nursing Admissions Professionals (GNAP) awards committee.

“I am very excited to have been asked to be a part of a national group and to represent Waynesburg University,” said Robinette. “I look forward to learning and sharing with others from across the country.”

Robinette will work directly with the chair of the GNAP awards committee in exploring potential candidates for the GNAP’s annual awards: the Best Practice in Graduate Nurse Recruiting Award and the Sandy J. Cody Service to the Graduate Nursing Admissions Professional Leadership Network Award.

Waynesburg will benefit from Robinette’s appointment through networking and the sharing of best practices for the application, enrollment and retention strategies of graduate study in nursing.

GNAP is comprised of nursing education administrators and faculty whose purpose is to provide an opportunity for those most involved in recruiting graduate nursing students to share their successes, develop new strategies and to establish a resource network of peers.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

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b2ap3_thumbnail_HEALTH_UD_078.jpgWaynesburg University’s Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program hosted a panel discussion and debate at the University’s Monroeville center Sunday, Nov. 16. 

In an effort to promote interprofessional opportunities, the DNP Program invited six first-year medical students from the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine to participate in the debate about healthcare utilization. 

“Most professions are seeking opportunities for interprofessional development,” said Dr. Kimberly Whiteman, assistant professor and co-director of the Graduate and Professional Studies Nursing Program and DNP Program at Waynesburg University. “We don’t have a medical school and they don’t have a nursing school; this program enabled both of us to have a collaborative experience.” 

Waynesburg’s DNP Program established this event in conjunction with the Institute of Medicine’s initiative to promote “interprofessional education for collaboration.” 

“It was well received on both ends,” said Dr. Kimberly Stephens, assistant professor of nursing at Waynesburg and co-director of the DNP Program. “Both our students and theirs thought it was beneficial, and it encouraged us to continue to look for opportunities that are valuable.”

Amber Egyud, full-time chief nursing officer for Allegheny Health Network and a second-year DNP student at Waynesburg University, participated in the debate. 

“The debate helped to develop networks that foster the exchange, synthesis and application of innovation to improve healthcare outcomes,” she said. “The benefit of interprofessional collaboration is the ability to share professional competence and experience to improve healthcare outcomes.” 

Waynesburg University's 36-credit Doctor of Nursing Practice program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, D.C., 20036, 202-887-6791. It is offered at the Monroeville Center. Each course meets one weekend every other month in the 15-week semester, with learning activities and assignments to be completed between seminars. 

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
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A Waynesburg University Graduate Counseling Program faculty member, as well as a faculty-and-student team, recently had scholarly papers accepted for presentation at national conferences.

Dr. Devon Manderino, assistant professor of counseling, will present her original research on spirituality in counseling at the North Atlantic Regional Conference of the Association of Counselor Educators and Supervision in Providence, R.I., later this month. 

Additionally, Laura Smith, a graduate counseling student; Dr. Scott Tracy, director of graduate programs in counseling and assistant professor of counseling; and Dr. Mark Lepore, an adjunct faculty member, will present their clinical poster, “Risk and Resiliency: The Prevention and Aftermath of School Violence,” at the Annual Conference of the American Counseling Association in Orlando, Fla., in April. 

“Waynesburg University students and faculty are committed both to adding to new knowledge about relevant counseling topics and serving the Christian mission of the institution,” Tracy said. “Both of these projects represent those commitments, as well as receiving the approval from peer reviewers.”

Manderino studied how spirituality has been directly linked to positive outcomes in counseling, while spiritual crises contribute to psychological symptoms such as anxiety, depression and psychosis. Despite this recognized link, counselor training related to spirituality is inconsistent and untested.

She said her project was aimed at developmentally educational activities that may significantly improve counselor trainee competency levels regarding the role of spirituality and religion in counseling.

Smith, Tracy and Lepore’s poster focused on the prevalence of school violence incidents, which have illuminated the need for a better understanding of the factors that predict mental health outcomes for students, teachers, school administrators, first responders and adjacent school communities.

“In almost all instances of school violence, somebody close to the perpetrator knew of the plan before it happened; however, in most cases the warning signs become clear only after the event takes place,” Smith said.

The poster outlines a model for understanding community needs that result from exposure to school violence with treatment strategies that may help affected communities heal and move forward.

“This project proposed the development of a collaborative system for students, teachers, parents and community members to provide children with emotional and social skills training, and when necessary, report concerns about the threat of violence,” Tracy said.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
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Beginning this fall, Waynesburg University will offer new athletic administration options through its Master of Education (M.Ed.) Program in partnership with the Western Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic League (WPIAL).

Developed in conjunction with athletic directors and coaches, the strategic curriculum will train and qualify prospective athletic directors. The program will also accredit current coaches and athletic directors, Amateur Athletic Union coaches and community coaches, among others. A 10 percent discount will be offered to individuals employed at all WPIAL schools for the first year only.

“Today’s athletic director is responsible for a wide variety of administrative duties,” said Dr. Lawrence G. Kushner, assistant professor and program director for the Graduate Education Program at Waynesburg University. “A comprehensive training program in athletic administration is long overdue in Pennsylvania.”

The National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association (NIAAA) requires athletic directors to be nationally certified through NIAAA-approved programs. The athletic administration offerings at Waynesburg University are currently in the approval process.

Main concepts within the curriculum include contemporary issues, facilities and event management, fundraising, sports budgets and fiscal practices and sports law.

The three new athletic administration options include:

  • A Concentration in Athletic Administration (15 credits)
  • An M.Ed. in Athletic Administration (30 credits)
  • An M.Ed. in Athletic Administration with Principal Certification (39 credits)

The M.Ed. in Athletic Administration with Principal Certification consists of fieldwork as well as coursework. Act 48 credits are available.

Courses within the Concentration in Athletic Administration will be offered on Saturdays at the University’s Southpointe Center. Other courses meet one night per week, Monday through Thursday, from 6 to 10 p.m., also at Southpointe. Courses are offered in eight-week accelerated sessions with year-round admission dates. The M.Ed. Program can be completed in two years or less.

The M.Ed. Program affords students the opportunity to earn graduate credits toward their Instructional II Certification. Students have the ability to choose a concentration from multiple options that will prepare them to become master teachers and school leaders. Concentrations in Online Teaching, Curriculum and Instructional Leadership and Autism Spectrum Disorders are also available.

For more information, contact Dr. Kushner at or 724-743-2260.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
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Beginning this fall, Waynesburg University will offer a Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision through its reputable Graduate and Professional Studies Program.

Employment of mental health counselors and substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors is projected to grow 29 percent and 31 percent, respectively, from 2012 to 2022 – much faster than the average for all occupations, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (2014).

Growth is expected because more people have addiction and mental health counseling services covered by their insurance policies.

“Waynesburg University’s Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision Program was developed based on a national need for counselor educators,” said Dr. Scott Tracy, director of graduate programs in counseling and assistant professor of counseling at the University. “Government agencies and insurance companies have come to grips with the magnitude of mental health in America. There’s a push to have more counselors, and as a result, we need more counselor educators.”

The Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision Program will be available September 1 and can be completed in three years.

With an over-arching goal of preparing leaders for the field of counseling, the Program was designed to develop students in the Christian tradition of Waynesburg University and prepare them for leadership roles in the counseling field.

“As a University dedicated to Christian service, the founding goals of the institution closely mimic that of the counseling profession,” Tracy said. “Our Christian identity makes this program distinctive, and we will be able to say the same about future graduates.”

The program is intended to prepare individuals for employment as counselor educators in colleges and universities and as leaders in clinical mental health counseling, addictions counseling or school counseling.

“The Waynesburg University Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision Program provides doctoral students with the information and skills required to carry out scholarly research, lead organizations and create new knowledge,” said Dave Mariner, the University’s director of program development.

In addition to core doctoral classes in research, students will also have experiences in college teaching and counselor supervision.  Some advanced courses in counseling practice are also offered. The program consists of a minimum of 54 semester credits beyond the master's degree, a clinical practicum, a specialty practicum, an internship, a candidacy examination and a dissertation.

With strategic curriculum developed by the fulltime counseling faculty at the University, the Ph.D. is designed to attract experienced professionals who hold master’s degrees and who want to become leaders in the counseling field.

“Specifically, we’re targeting for leadership positions in community mental health counseling, addictions counseling and school counseling,” Tracy said.

Tracy worked with fulltime counseling faculty on the curriculum for the Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision Program. The team also received guidance from Mariner.

Waynesburg University master's degree programs in clinical mental health counseling and addiction counseling are accredited by the American Counseling Association's Council on Accreditation for Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The School Counseling and Ph.D. Counselor Education specializations are in the application phase of the accreditation process.

For more information, contact Tracy at 724-743-2259 or

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
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