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b2ap3_thumbnail_image001.jpgDr. Darryl Husenits, CONSOL Energy’s vice president for material and supply chain management and a facilitator within Waynesburg University’s Master of Business Administration (MBA) Program, was recently awarded the Pittsburgh Business Times’ Educator Energy Leadership Award.

The Energy Leadership Awards recognize “the influencers who have helped shape the [energy] industry.” 

Husenits worked with representatives from Waynesburg as well as Dr. George Smith, general manager of value chain at CONSOL Energy and an alumnus of the University’s MBA Program, and Dr. Jeanna Cooper, manager of e-services at CONSOL Energy, to develop strategic curriculum for an Energy Management Concentration for the University’s MBA Program. The Energy Management Concentration was launched in 2012.

“This team was able to help Waynesburg design and implement our concentration in Energy Management,” said David Mariner, dean of graduate and professional studies at Waynesburg University. “We always look for ways to improve and enhance our curriculum. Husenits, Smith and Cooper were instrumental with this process.”

According to Mariner, through communication with students and employers, the University determined that there was a need to implement curriculum into the MBA degree that was geared toward the energy industry.

“We noticed an increase in enrollment from students working in the energy field,” Mariner said. “It was an easy choice to reach out to Dr. Husenits because of his experience and education, not to mention he was an alumnus of our MBA Program. Dr. Husenits then helped us to connect to Dr. Smith and Dr. Cooper.”

According to Husenits, the University’s Energy Management Concentration fills a void in higher education, as “it provides students with a broad view of the energy sector and will help students to make decisions that will add value to their employers.”

“The focus of the program is to deliver value to students by covering strategic industry drivers such as safety, compliance (internal and external), continuous improvement and risk analysis. This concentration also provides practical application processes in Project Management as well as Supply Chain Management,” said Husenits, who has taught courses for the concentration since its inception.

Husenits holds a bachelor’s degree in marketing management from Seton Hill University, an MBA in applied business from Waynesburg University and a Ph.D. in information systems and communication from Robert Morris University. 

Waynesburg University’s 36-credit MBA Program can be completed in two years or less. Students can set their own degree pace with an exclusive “step in – step out” class format. Courses are offered in eight-week accelerated sessions with year-round admission dates. Classes meet one night per week, Monday through Thursday, from 6 to 10 p.m., at four convenient locations: Monroeville, Seven Fields, Southpointe and Waynesburg. Saturday morning classes are offered at the Southpointe location.

For more information, contact Janice Crile at 724-743-2269 or jcrile@waynesburg.edu.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Tagged in: GAPS News MBA News
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b2ap3_thumbnail_whiteman.jpgDr. Kimberly Whiteman, assistant professor and co-director of the Graduate and Professional Studies (GAPS) Nursing Program and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program at Waynesburg University, recently published an article in Critical Care Nurse, a peer reviewed journal. 

The article, “Choosing the best evidence to guide clinical practice: Application of AACN levels of evidence,” was published in the April 2014 edition. 

The article was a result of the work of the Evidence-Based Practice Resource Work Group for the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN). As a member of that group, Whiteman shares authorship.

“The group was charged with revising the organization’s level of evidence hierarchy in 2011,” Whiteman said. “During the revisions, the group also decided to include a visual pyramid with the levels. Most of the research was around other organizations and their levels compared to AACN’s and on the current trends in evidence-based practice.”  

The level of evidences and evidence-based care pyramid will be introduced at the organizations National Teaching Institute in Denver, Colo., May 18 through 22.  

AACN is the world’s largest nursing specialty organization with more than 100,000 members. Most of the members are directly related to patient care, either as bedside nurses or supporting bedside nurses. 

“The organization strives to give the membership the tools that are needed to provide care for patients that is based on current evidence,” Whiteman said. “Projects such as this one permit nurses to use a common language to critique and apply evidence.” 

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Students in Waynesburg University’s Master of Arts in Counseling Program achieved a milestone during the most recent National Counselor Examination for Licensure and Certification (NCE), collectively scoring above the national average for accredited counseling programs. One Waynesburg University student obtained the top national score, an honor shared with the top 5 percent of examinees nationwide. 

More than 4,000 graduate counselors sat for the exam.

“The NCE is the national benchmark for knowledge and skills in the counseling profession,” said Scott Tracy, director of graduate programs in counseling at Waynesburg. “Waynesburg University’s Program has reached a point in its evolution that makes it comparable to similar programs at large universities.”

The NCE is used for two purposes: national counselor certification and state counselor licensure. The purpose of the NCE is to assess knowledge, skills and abilities viewed as important for providing effective counseling services. The NCE is designed to be general in nature. It is intended to assess cognitive knowledge which should be known by all counselors regardless of their individual professional specialties.
Satisfactory performance on the NCE is one of the criteria used by the National Board for Certified Counselors to identify professionals who may be eligible to become National Certified Counselors.

Waynesburg University’s Master of Arts in Counseling Program is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). CACREP is an independent agency recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation to accredit master's degree and doctoral programs in counseling. To achieve accreditation, programs voluntarily submit a self-study that is reviewed against the CACREP Standards by counselors and counselor educators to ensure that students receive a quality educational experience.

Courses within Waynesburg University’s Graduate and Professional Studies (GAPS) Programs are offered in eight-week accelerated sessions with year-round admission dates. Classes meet one or two nights per week, Monday through Thursday, from 6 to 10 p.m., at four convenient locations: Monroeville, Seven Fields, Southpointe and Waynesburg.

For more information, contact Tracy at stracy@waynesburg.edu or 724-743-2259.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Deborah-Lewis-resized.jpgDr. Deborah Lewis, director of the RN to BSN Program at Waynesburg University, was selected to present at the 6th Annual Best Practice in Nursing Education Conference March 21, 2014 at UPMC Mercy Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Her abstract, “You want me to do what?  Practice Experience in an RN to BSN program,” outlines the ways in which Waynesburg University’s RN to BSN Program provides practice experience and “allows theory to inform students’ practice and their practice to inform theory with the use of adult learning principles in the classroom.”  

Lewis submitted her abstract to share with other local educators and nurses the process of practice experience in Waynesburg's RN to BSN Program. 

“The students have a required one credit of service learning,” she said. “I think this, along with their other experiences such as the Intro to the New Testament course, gives students the background for looking at their professional and personal life in a different way.”

Sponsored by the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing, UPMC St. Margaret School of Nursing, UPMC Shadyside School of Nursing and Pennsylvania League for Nursing Area VI, the conference aims to bring together nursing educators from across the region to discuss best practices.

Lewis’s presentation will include the learning objectives, method of instruction and content covered in her poster.

Waynesburg University's RN to BSN Program is designed specifically to meet the needs of working RNs who are motivated to meet personal educational goals and want to enhance their career options. The Program is structured in a user-friendly format that allows adult students to balance work and family responsibilities with school-related efforts.

 

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Kimberly Stephens

Waynesburg University's fully accredited Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program now offers two degree plans implemented to better accommodate the needs of the working professional.

The University's DNP Program, offering a terminal professional degree that focuses on the clinical aspects of nursing rather than academic research, can now be completed through a three-year or a four-year track.

“The four-year degree plan for the DNP Program was created because we really listen to the feedback that our students give us,” said Dave Mariner, dean of Graduate Studies at Waynesburg University. “Our DNP students are juggling family, demanding careers and school. The four-year option allows students to have a little more time to manage their priorities.”

In addition to a new degree plan, the DNP Program recently named Dr. Kimberly Stephens and Dr. Kimberly Whiteman co-directors of the Program.

“I strive to make our program high-quality and to honor the Christian mission of the University,” Dr. Whiteman said. “I want to help students acquire the knowledge and skills they need to lead in the complex health care environment.”

Dr. Stephens and Dr. Whiteman have been with Waynesburg University since 2008 and 2009, respectively. Prior to transitioning into their current roles, they served as assistant professors of nursing in the University's Graduate and Professional Studies Program. Both are also graduates of the program which they now oversee.

“As nurse leaders, we have a professional imperative to understand systems, system change and how to inspire and lead teams through what will be a pivotal time in transforming health care,” Dr. Stephens said. “I believe we can't miss this opportunity to demonstrate what a DNP-prepared nurse can contribute to our changing health care landscape. I strive to inspire and challenge every DNP student to a life of leadership and purpose for the glory of God.”

Waynesburg University established its DNP Program in 2007 as one of the first 25 DNP programs in the United States.

From 2004 to 2006, Dr. Nancy Mosser, professor of nursing and chair of the Department of Nursing at Waynesburg University, served as a committee member of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing DNP Roadmap Task Force. The committee was charged with examining DNP program development, master's-to-doctoral transition programs, regulations, licensure, reimbursement for advanced practice and other issues.

The Roadmap Task Force worked closely with the DNP Essentials Task Force, whose goal was to develop curricular and content requirements for DNP programs. Dr. Mosser and other committee members from both task forces attended regional meetings across the country to obtain input related to DNP program development from a number of constituencies.

“The exploration and development of the DNP Program at Waynesburg is consistent with the guidelines developed by both committees,” Dr. Mosser said.

Kimberly WhitemanWaynesburg's DNP Programs differs from Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) programs because the focus is on evidence-based practice and systems leadership that has an immediate impact on the quality of health care delivery, rather than on developing programs of original research as traditional Ph.D. program graduates do. According to Dr. Mosser, Waynesburg's DNP Program serves as a natural extension to the University's Master of Science in Nursing degree program with a concentration in administration, but also is appropriate for those with education, informatics and advanced practice backgrounds.

“In this program, students enhance their understanding of principles of leadership and are ready to assume an active role in promoting the highest quality health care delivery from a values-based perspective,” Dr. Mosser said.

Among the students in the University's DNP Program are administrators, educators, executive leaders, certified registered nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and certified registered nurse anesthetists from all over the country.

With their dedication to leading a quality program and personal experience within the program itself, both Dr. Stephens and Dr. Whiteman are assets to the DNP Program.

“We use a leadership team to manage the operations of the DNP Program,” Mariner said. “Both Dr. Stephens and Dr. Whiteman work extremely well together and have provided great leadership to our faculty and students.”

Before joining Waynesburg, Dr. Stephens served as a professor of nursing at the Community College of Allegheny County and an education and staff development specialist for the West Penn Allegheny Health System. She also worked in a variety of clinical settings including rehabilitation, oncology and home care at major hospitals throughout the Pittsburgh area.

In addition to a DNP degree from Waynesburg University, Dr. Stephens holds a Master of Science in Nursing and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, both from Duquesne University.

Dr. Whiteman served as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Nursing and a nurse educator with UPMC Presbyterian prior to joining Waynesburg. She also served in various roles within the Liver Transplantation Intensive Care Unit at UPMC and as a staff nurse at Hershey Medical Center and UPMC.

Dr. Whiteman received a DNP degree from Waynesburg University, a Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Pittsburgh and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Pennsylvania State University.

Waynesburg University's 36-credit DNP Program is offered at one of three suburban Pittsburgh locations, Southpointe, Monroeville or North Hills, determined by the geographic location of admitted students. Each course meets one weekend every other month in the 15-week semester, with learning activities and assignments to be completed between seminars. The program has been approved by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu


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