Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in history

b2ap3_thumbnail_5-16-Gettysburg-monuments.pngWaynesburg University recently adopted two monuments at Gettysburg National Military Park. The monuments will be maintained and preserved during the University’s annual fall Faith, Learning and Service Immersion Trip to Gettysburg.

The adopted monuments include the 140th Pennsylvania Infantry – West of Sickles and the 1st Regiment US Sharpshooters (Andrews SS-MA) – Zeigler’s Grove.

Rea Redd, director of the Eberly Library, is the team leader for the Gettysburg service trips and presented the project to the University in an effort to form a long-term service agreement between Waynesburg University and the Gettysburg National Military Park.

“Students who participate in these service learning trips to care for our adopted monuments will help to preserve our nation’s heritage of freedom and the beauty of the natural environment,” said Redd. “The monuments represent the stories of soldiers, several of whom are Waynesburg alumni and Medal of Honor recipients.”

Redd will volunteer with the students to help educate them and make connections between their real-life experiences and American history.

“The monuments are also memorials to Gettysburg civilians who performed heroic deeds in caring for the wounded or burying the dead,” added Redd. “Learning their stories will help students think about how to respond should they ever find themselves living through the kind of local devastation that followed the battle of Gettysburg.”

The roles and responsibilities of the adoption agreement state that tasks may include raking, seeding, erosion control, litter pick up, brush clearing, fence repair and/or restoration, clearing/restacking stone walls, painting, weed and/or exotic plant removal and other general work as directed by park personnel.

“Students will now have the opportunity to learn about history outside of the classroom by volunteering on the battlefield,” said Kelley Hardie, assistant dean of student services. “One of the many goals of our service trips is for students to make the connections between academics and service, and this certainly fulfills that mission.”

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

# # #

Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 451

b2ap3_thumbnail_Karen-Fisher-Younger.jpgDr. Karen Fisher Younger, chair of the Department of Humanities at Waynesburg University, will appear in a documentary film, “The Daring Women of Philadelphia,” which will be produced by the Emmy-Award-winning studio History Making Productions.

The writer of the documentary requested to interview Younger after reading a scholarly article she wrote which was published in Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography in July 2010. The article, based on Younger’s doctoral dissertation, discussed females’ role in the American colonization movement in Philadelphia in the 1830s-40s.

“The American colonization movement was an early anti-slavery movement that predated the rise of abolitionism,” said Younger. “The movement advocated freeing slaves and resettling them in Liberia, Africa. It attracted some of the most well-known men and women of the era, but an examination of northern female participation had been virtually ignored by historians.”

Younger will be interviewed this month for the first episode of the documentary, which is about abolitionist pioneers of the 19th century.

“I’m always excited to be able to share what I know with the public,” said Younger. “It’s a validation of my scholarship, and this particular opportunity seems really fun.”

To learn more about the History program at Waynesburg University, visit waynesburg.edu/history.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

# # #

Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Tagged in: history History News
Hits: 404

Students in Waynesburg University's Honors and History programs are preparing to begin a cemetery conservation project in conjunction with Hill’s Schoolhouse Cemetery.

Led by senior history major David O’Donoghue, the project is the result of collaboration between students in the Honors Program, the History Club and a Public History course taught by Dr. Karen Fisher Younger, chair of the Department of Humanities.

Throughout the semester, history students will research the history of the cemetery site and delve into the genealogy and lives of families buried there.

Then, the Honors Program will host a cemetery preservation workshop March 18, the University’s Day of Service. The hands-on workshop will teach students about upkeep of grounds and preserving and documenting tombstones at the cemetery.

Younger said the project is just one example of the University working to tie students’ learning into contributions to the local community.

“History is alive all around us. I hope students will come away with a feeling of great satisfaction knowing that they served the surrounding community by caring for the final resting place of over two dozen men, women and children,” said Younger.

Members of the community with information about individuals or families buried at the site and/or old photographs of the cemetery that could aid students in their research are encouraged to contact O’Donoghue at odo1639@student.waynesburg.edu.

The University owns and maintains the cemetery; it was acquired in the same purchase as the land that now holds the baseball fields and tennis courts.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

# # #

Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

 

Hits: 551

A Waynesburg University professor was recently published in the online journal The Imaginative Conservative. Dr. William Batchelder, assistant professor of history, wrote an article that appeared in the journal Sept. 22.

The article, entitled “The Counsel of Despair? Albert J. Nock on Self-Government,” explores the ideas of political theorist Albert J. Nock, whose written works were widely published. Batchelder said Nock was a radical (a Libertarian in today’s terms) but saw no point in trying to convince others to align with his views, as he thought most people could not be educated.

“The question I posed is, ‘Why would he bother writing on political theory if he felt there was little to no chance of having any real-world impact?’” said Batchelder. “I think the answer is that Nock wrote these works out of a sense of duty to philosophy.”

Batchelder sent the article to The Imaginative Conservative after a writer he admires from Hillsdale College expressed interest in Nock. He expanded the article from a paper he presented at a conference earlier this year, and the revised version was approved and published by the journal.

Batchelder said he is pleased to be published in The Imaginative Conservative, as it appeals to a wide variety of Christians and Conservatives.

“It is a thoughtful, interesting website,” said Batchelder. “The website publishes on a broad spectrum of topics, and there is always something fun or provocative to read there.”

Batchelder has also been published in a peer-reviewed journal called Anamnesis and online at Nomocracy in Politics. He said the process of getting work published drives him to rethink the work he does with his students in the classroom, sharpening his knowledge and students’ experience.

Batchelder’s article can be read at http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2016/09/counsel-despair-albert-j-nock-self-government-batchelder.html.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

# # #

Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

 

Hits: 324

Local genealogist and Waynesburg University alumna Candice Buchanan recently published a book, “A Waynesburg College Family: The Legacy of Alfred Brashear & Margaret Kerr (Bell) Miller."

b2ap3_thumbnail_12-7-Miller-book.jpgThe Millers helped to lead Waynesburg University (then Waynesburg College) to be one of the first institutions of higher learning in the nation to educate men and women equally. In the book, Buchanan explores the Millers’ role in the College’s successful implementation of coeducation. As a uniquely partnered couple, working so hard together, the Millers set a powerful example for their children, students and colleagues, according to Buchanan.

Buchanan’s work also focuses on the two-fold legacy of the Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Miller at Waynesburg, both as leaders within the College and as parents to their eight children.

“Ms. Buchanan did a superb job of telling the story of the Miller family,” said Waynesburg University President Douglas G. Lee, who accepted archival copies recently presented to the University. “Our University and our community are extremely fortunate to have someone with her dedication and ability devoted to such a meaningful project.”

Buchanan conducted research through documented student testimonies about the Millers in addition to family records and photographs. Throughout the book, she shares the history of Dr. Miller’s experiences at Waynesburg College as a student through his tenure as president, as well as Mrs. Miller’s days as a teacher.

“I am a third-generation Waynesburg graduate,” said Buchanan. “I have ancestors who actually studied under Alfred and Margaret and being part of the Waynesburg legacy is how I can connect to that couple.”

Buchanan earned a Bachelor of Arts in history from Waynesburg University and Master of Arts in history from Duquesne University. She is the head of research and production at Genealogists.com, in addition to being a genealogy consultant for Memory Medallion, Inc. She is a certified genealogist by the Board for Certification of Genealogists in Washington, D.C.

To purchase the book, visit GreeneConnections.com or Amazon.com. The book is also available in the University’s Eberly Library. 

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

###

Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 1513