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Students in Waynesburg University's Honors and History programs are preparing to begin a cemetery conservation project in conjunction with Hill’s Schoolhouse Cemetery.

Led by senior history major David O’Donoghue, the project is the result of collaboration between students in the Honors Program, the History Club and a Public History course taught by Dr. Karen Fisher Younger, chair of the Department of Humanities.

Throughout the semester, history students will research the history of the cemetery site and delve into the genealogy and lives of families buried there.

Then, the Honors Program will host a cemetery preservation workshop March 18, the University’s Day of Service. The hands-on workshop will teach students about upkeep of grounds and preserving and documenting tombstones at the cemetery.

Younger said the project is just one example of the University working to tie students’ learning into contributions to the local community.

“History is alive all around us. I hope students will come away with a feeling of great satisfaction knowing that they served the surrounding community by caring for the final resting place of over two dozen men, women and children,” said Younger.

Members of the community with information about individuals or families buried at the site and/or old photographs of the cemetery that could aid students in their research are encouraged to contact O’Donoghue at odo1639@student.waynesburg.edu.

The University owns and maintains the cemetery; it was acquired in the same purchase as the land that now holds the baseball fields and tennis courts.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

 

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A Waynesburg University professor was recently published in the online journal The Imaginative Conservative. Dr. William Batchelder, assistant professor of history, wrote an article that appeared in the journal Sept. 22.

The article, entitled “The Counsel of Despair? Albert J. Nock on Self-Government,” explores the ideas of political theorist Albert J. Nock, whose written works were widely published. Batchelder said Nock was a radical (a Libertarian in today’s terms) but saw no point in trying to convince others to align with his views, as he thought most people could not be educated.

“The question I posed is, ‘Why would he bother writing on political theory if he felt there was little to no chance of having any real-world impact?’” said Batchelder. “I think the answer is that Nock wrote these works out of a sense of duty to philosophy.”

Batchelder sent the article to The Imaginative Conservative after a writer he admires from Hillsdale College expressed interest in Nock. He expanded the article from a paper he presented at a conference earlier this year, and the revised version was approved and published by the journal.

Batchelder said he is pleased to be published in The Imaginative Conservative, as it appeals to a wide variety of Christians and Conservatives.

“It is a thoughtful, interesting website,” said Batchelder. “The website publishes on a broad spectrum of topics, and there is always something fun or provocative to read there.”

Batchelder has also been published in a peer-reviewed journal called Anamnesis and online at Nomocracy in Politics. He said the process of getting work published drives him to rethink the work he does with his students in the classroom, sharpening his knowledge and students’ experience.

Batchelder’s article can be read at http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2016/09/counsel-despair-albert-j-nock-self-government-batchelder.html.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

 

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Posted by on in Alumni

For as long as he can remember, Colin Phillips has been fascinated by politics. From a young age, his parents instilled in him the belief that as a citizen of the United States of America, he has the power to make a difference through the use of politics.

A 2015 graduate of Waynesburg University, the history alumnus will begin coursework for his Ph.D. in political science at the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia, this fall. This program will allow Phillips to entirely bypass the master’s program, and immediately begin working toward his Ph.D., an opportunity afforded to him as a result of his undergraduate success and impressive GRE scores.

Phillips’s involvement with Waynesburg University’s Stover Scholars Program, a program dedicated to the study of U.S. government and policy, also helped to cement his aspirations and work toward his calling.

Through this program, Phillips received the opportunity to further his knowledge of the United States government and Constitution through various discussions and experiences.

“Through this program, I not only was able to be around successful people in government who were able to shed light on how they got to where they are at, but also was able to have in-depth looks at current matters in our society and apply both moral reasoning to them, as well as Christian ethics,” Phillips said. “Through this, and the gain of a firm understanding [of] the Constitution, the Stover Program allows for its scholars to certainly have an experience that puts them ahead of the others that they encounter outside Waynesburg University.”

In addition, Phillips believes that having strong mentors in Dr. Waddel, professor of political science, and Dr. Lawrence M. Stratton, assistant professor of ethics and constitutional law and director of the Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership, taught him, motivated him and encouraged him to understand leadership and cultivate change.

“Both men played an enormous role in growing my knowledge and interest in politics,” said Phillips. “My private casual discussions with them about life and other matters turned out to be very influential. They both proved to be very caring and interested in my future, making sure that I had what I needed to go on and be successful. I was truly blessed to have them while at Waynesburg.”

Phillips believes that his time spent as an undergraduate student and a variety of interactions at Waynesburg University helped to further develop his leadership skills.  It wasn’t long before he found himself becoming more of a leader both inside the classroom and out, citing these skills as incredibly useful in his various internship experiences.

Due to these past internships with United States Representative Pat Tiberi, Ohio Governor John Kasich and the Ohio Board of Reagents, Phillips has been able to map out a potential future for himself.   As a result, upon completion of graduate school, he intends to pursue a career in politics.

“With these experiences, I was able to get a first hand look at how different sectors of our government work,” Phillips said.  “In doing so, I was able to see what things I liked, what changes I would make and plan out a path for myself within politics."

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ColbyElbridge_WEB_HIGH_0.jpgElbridge Colby, the Robert M. Gates Fellow at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), will present his foreign policy address, “Why We Should Worry about China, and What We Can Do about It,” Thursday, Oct. 30 at 7: 30 p.m. in Alumni Hall on the third floor of Miller Hall.

“This is a unique opportunity to hear, in person, from someone who works at the very influential Center for a New American Security, which is a major Washington, D.C., foreign policy think tank,” said Dr. William Batchelder, assistant professor of history at Waynesburg University.

In his position at CNAS, Colby focuses on strategic deterrence, nuclear weapons, conventional force, intelligence and related issues. 

He has also served as the policy advisor to the Secretary of Defense’s Representative for the new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, an expert advisor to the Congressional Strategic Posture Commission and a staff member on the President’s Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the U.S. Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction. 

According to the WMD Commission Report, the WMD Commission was charged with assessing whether the Intelligence Community was sufficiently authorized to identify, warn and support U.S. government efforts to respond to resources associated with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and other related threats of the 21st century and their employment by foreign powers, including terrorists, terrorist organizations and private networks. 

Colby has also worked with the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq and the State Department. 

For more information, contact Dr. Batchelder at 724-852-3331 or wbatchel@waynesburg.edu. 

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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