Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Mini Relay for Life

b2ap3_thumbnail_campus-photo.jpgWaynesburg University will host its eighth annual Mini-Relay for Life Sunday, April 19, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. in the University’s Johnson Commons. 

Every spring, Waynesburg students rally together to generate awareness and raise funds for the American Cancer Society. A representative from each student group on campus must walk for an hour at a time, making sure a team member is always on the course. The public is cordially invited to attend and enjoy food, games and prizes.

During this year’s “Disney” themed relay, campus organizations sell food and products as well as host activities to engage the campus and community in the fundraising cause. Organizations are also encouraged to fundraise as teams or individually before the event.

“It is crucial for each student group to fundraise,” said Theresa Butler, junior accounting major and president of the Mini-Relay for Life. “Without each different club and organization, it would be impossible to host this event on campus and reach our overall goal.”

The event will commence with a morning service led by Reverend James Tinnemeyer, University chaplain and director of the Center for Leadership and Christian Ministry at the University and an opening ceremony led by University President Douglas G. Lee. 

According to Kelley Hardie, assistant dean of student services, Relay for Life gives the community hope because everyone is striving to make a difference in finding a cure for cancer. Every year, Hardie and the relay captains establish a certain monetary goal.

“This year we hope to reach an overall goal of $16,000,” said Hardie. “If every team reaches their individual goals, this will be 100 percent possible.”

The Mini Relay for Life will conclude with an acoustic Upper Room service and a closing ceremony with an American Cancer Society Representative.

“Everybody has someone in their life that has been touched by cancer,” said Megan Bayles, junior public relations major and vice president of the Mini-Relay for Life. “It is important for everyone to get involved in Relay for Life and help find a cure.” 

The 2015 Relay for Life officers are:

  • President: Theresa Butler, a senior accounting major from Uniontown, Pa. (Laurel Highlands Senior High School)
  • Vice President: Megan Bayles, a junior public relations major from Carmichaels, Pa. (Carmichaels Area Junior-Senior High School)
  • Survivorship: Nicole Zimmel, a junior early childhood education major from Slippery Rock, Pa. (Slippery Rock Area High School)
  • Online Chair: Brittany Orndoff, a senior secondary education major from Waynesburg, Pa. (Waynesburg Central High School)
  • Main Stage Chair: Emily Hoffman, a senior secondary education major from Salisbury, Md. (Salisbury Christian School)

For more information, contact Hardie at khardie@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3461.

Hits: 497

b2ap3_thumbnail_strouse.jpgGrant Strouse, a junior chemistry major at Waynesburg University, shared his story of cancer survival at the University’s annual mini-Relay-for-Life Sunday, April 27, 2014. 

Strouse was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, a blood cancer that attacks the lymph nodes, as a sophomore in March of 2013. He withdrew from classes for two semesters and underwent six rounds of chemotherapy during a 23-week span.

During that time, Strouse said he was encouraged by the Waynesburg University community. 

“Shortly after I was diagnosed, I received multiple emails, texts and cards from friends and fellow students asking if there was any way that they could help,” Strouse said. “It made me feel like I was part of something bigger, part of a family here in Waynesburg.”

After a strenuous battle with many “bumps in the road,” Strouse was declared in remission August 15 of the same year. He is expected to graduate from Waynesburg University next December.

“When you’ve beaten cancer, graduating college doesn’t seem like that difficult of a task,” he said. “Being a cancer survivor isn’t just an achievement, but a mindset. We celebrate the many survivors of this horrible disease, we remember those who we have lost and we strive for the day when cancer is no more.” 

At Relay, he spoke about the initial mourning process he underwent when he learned he had cancer. 

“I experienced a complete flood of confusion, denial and anger,” he said. “Specifically, I was angry with God. I was at a point in my life where I thought that I had everything figured out. I was going to graduate on time and start my life.”

He told the crowd that his feelings of confusion and anger ceased when a close atheist friend began attending church to pray for Strouse’s recovery. 

“Then the realization hit me. As Christians, we are called to deny ourselves, to lay down our bodies to be used for the furthering of His Kingdom, no matter the circumstances we are under, no matter where we are in our lives,” Strouse said.

He said that cancer taught him that when God is really all you have, He is all you need. Strouse believes that the Lord brought him through the worst time of his life, and promised others that God would do the same for them. 

“As a cancer survivor, I have learned more about life and death than most 22 year olds should know; the glaring realization that we are not, in fact, invincible,” Strouse said. “I’ve also learned that strength and perseverance are not about how much you can lift or how far you can run, but it is a measure of your endurance, the ability to stare down a daunting task and overcome it.” 

# # #

Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Hits: 858