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Michael Campbell, 2014 Nursing 

Registered Nurse, St. Clair Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pa. – Intermediate Care Unit

Michael Campbell spends his 12-hour work shifts constantly moving and staying active. Working in the intermediate care unit at St. Clair Hospital in Pittsburgh Pa., Campbell is very busy dealing with multiple patients with varying degrees of illnesses. 

As a registered nurse, he records patient medical histories and symptoms, provides patient care and interprets cardiac rhythms. 

Securing a job just one month after graduation, Campbell earned his bachelor of science in nursing at Waynesburg University in May at 31 years old. 

Although wearing the many hats of student, husband and father seemed challending at times, Campbell said Waynesburg’s Nursing Program prepared him to enter the workforce with confidence. He adds that the Program provided him with the foundation he needed to become a nurse. 

“Waynesburg gave me the challenge I was looking for while providing me the skills and knowledge I needed to start a career as a nurse,” said Campbell. “I was able to have clinical at multiple hospitals, which allowed me to decide what hospital was the right fit for me once I graduated.”


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b2ap3_thumbnail_Mosser.jpgDr. Nancy Mosser, chair and director of the Waynesburg University Department of Nursing and professor of nursing, was recently notified that her entry, “Progression Testing,” was accepted for publication in the Encyclopedia of Nursing Education.

More than 170 entries from across the nation will be included, with an even greater number of contributors. The book will be published early in 2015.

 “I was very pleased to have my entry accepted for submission in the Encyclopedia of Nursing Education,” Mosser said. “It provided me with the opportunity to contribute to the discourse on scholarship in nursing education and to describe a practice that has been well developed in the Department of Nursing at Waynesburg University.”

Mosser is published in many areas, including leadership, an area she became familiar with while earning her doctor of education degree in educational leadership studies with a minor in nursing (West Virginia University). She also received a master of science in nursing in primary health care with a focus in maternal-child and family (West Virginia University), as well as her bachelor of science in nursing degree (University of Pittsburgh).

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or

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b2ap3_thumbnail_whiteman.jpgDr. Kimberly Whiteman, assistant professor and co-director of the Graduate and Professional Studies (GAPS) Nursing Program and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program at Waynesburg University, recently published an article in Critical Care Nurse, a peer reviewed journal. 

The article, “Choosing the best evidence to guide clinical practice: Application of AACN levels of evidence,” was published in the April 2014 edition. 

The article was a result of the work of the Evidence-Based Practice Resource Work Group for the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN). As a member of that group, Whiteman shares authorship.

“The group was charged with revising the organization’s level of evidence hierarchy in 2011,” Whiteman said. “During the revisions, the group also decided to include a visual pyramid with the levels. Most of the research was around other organizations and their levels compared to AACN’s and on the current trends in evidence-based practice.”  

The level of evidences and evidence-based care pyramid will be introduced at the organizations National Teaching Institute in Denver, Colo., May 18 through 22.  

AACN is the world’s largest nursing specialty organization with more than 100,000 members. Most of the members are directly related to patient care, either as bedside nurses or supporting bedside nurses. 

“The organization strives to give the membership the tools that are needed to provide care for patients that is based on current evidence,” Whiteman said. “Projects such as this one permit nurses to use a common language to critique and apply evidence.” 

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or

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Posted by on in Alumni


RN (Charge Nurse) at Ruby Memorial Hospital and Clinical Instructor at Waynesburg University

Morgantown, W.Va. and Waynesburg, Pa.

Additional Info:

  • Waynesburg University Resident Assistant, Church Education Board
  • Bachelor of Science, Waynesburg University, 2012

“The quality education I received from Waynesburg University helped me to become informed leaders amongst my peers.”

Tagged in: nursing nursing alumni
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Hoping to maximize her internship experience, Kaitlin Oliver, a senior nursing major at Waynesburg University, thoughtfully considered where she might develop the most expertise during the summer of 2013. At her interview for a prestigious student nurse intern position at the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Oliver was asked to choose two departments in which she wanted to work. 

“At the time, I had no idea which to select, so I asked the supervisor on which floors she thought I would learn the most,” Oliver said. “The majority of students select the intensive care units. However, I was skeptical because those patients are extremely ill; so I did not think I would get the opportunity to do much for the patients as a student.”

Impressed by Oliver’s commitment to absorbing the most out of the experience, the supervisor suggested that she work on the transplant or the neurosurgery, trauma and orthopedic unit, both of which are internationally recognized. Shortly after she jotted those down and left the interview, Oliver was offered the position. 

“The internship gave me the opportunity to work 12-hour shifts, which is what is expected in the real world,” Oliver said. “Working 12 hours allowed me to see everything that a nurse does in a typical day including receiving reports, making initial assessments, administering morning medications, acknowledging orders, providing patient education, providing discharge instructions, completing documentation and much more.”

At the internship, Oliver worked alongside a registered nurse to which she was assigned the first day of orientation. 

“I got the opportunity to do all of the tasks and skills that the registered nurse did, with a one-on-one relationship,” Oliver said. “I felt as though the nurse valued me and made me feel more like a nurse than I ever have before.”  

The nurse trusted Oliver to perform many tasks independently due to the student’s excellent preparation and advanced bedside manner. During the summer, Oliver cared diligently for a small boy who couldn’t breathe on his own. Given the tasks of suctioning, flushing his IV, providing his feedings through his gastrostomy tube, and much more for the child, Oliver said her heart ached for him. Her love for God’s children shone through her care, compassion and expertise.

“The Waynesburg University Nursing Department teaches the importance of providing holistic care, which sets it apart from other nursing schools,” Oliver said. “While caring for my patients, I realized that I wanted to care for my patients beyond their physiological needs; I wanted to care for them emotionally, spiritually and socially. My goal was to serve my patients as if it were one of my loved ones lying in that hospital bed.”

That experience, and many others throughout the summer, reminded her of why she wanted to be a nurse. Many people, including Christina Miser, an instructor of nursing at Waynesburg University and Oliver’s clinical adviser, believe that the profession fits her perfectly. 

“Kaitlin is always enthusiastic and is eager to learn, absorb new information and apply it to future experiences,” Miser said. “Her achievements thus far reflect her hard work; I believe she has placed herself in a position to be successful in whatever avenue of nursing she chooses.” 

Though that avenue is still undetermined, Oliver knows that she has both the skills and the confidence to excel in her chosen profession. 

 “At the internship, I was proud to be representing Waynesburg University. I had a lot of nurses ask me where I go to school because they were impressed with what I knew,” Oliver said. “Being a student nurse intern exposed me to situations that caused me to critically think and problem solve.  It reassured me that I chose the right career path, and I cannot wait to do something that I love for the rest of my days.” 


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