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b2ap3_thumbnail_Mary-Cummings.jpgThe Corpob2ap3_thumbnail_HonorRoll-Logo1.pngration for National and Community Service (CNCS) recently notified Waynesburg University of its selection to the President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll. This is the University's seventh consecutive year receiving the honor.

The President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll is the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to community, service-learning and civic engagement. CNCS is a federal agency that improves lives, strengthens communities and fosters civic engagement through service and volunteering.

“Receiving this award for the seventh year in a row demonstrates the continued commitment of our students, faculty and staff to live out the service component of our mission by engaging in our community," said Mary Cummings, vice president of Student Services. “By integrating service with the academic programs at our University, we prepare our students for a life of community engagement not only during their undergraduate experience, but after graduation as well.”

The Honor Roll, launched in 2006, recognizes institutions of higher education that support exemplary community service programs and raise the visibility of effective practices in campus community partnerships. Honorees for the award were chosen based on a series of selection factors including scope and innovation of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service and the extent to which academic service-learning courses are offered.

Waynesburg University students contribute more than 50,000 service hours annually. Through its more than 50 local and regional agencies and a continuously expanding network of international agencies, Waynesburg University encourages students to become servant-leaders through a number of partnerships.

The University offers approximately 16 service mission trips per academic year. The trips are held during the fall, winter, spring and summer breaks. The University also participates in a number of weekend-long service projects in the local community and beyond.

In addition to volunteer hours, the University offers a service leadership minor constructed around service-learning courses. During the semester-long courses, students perform a set amount of hours of community service with a non-profit organization.

The University is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar Schools in the country. With support from the Corella and Bertram F. Bonner Foundation, Waynesburg is committed to the program which was created to offer scholarship assistance to students performing significant amounts of community service throughout their time at Waynesburg. Approximately 60 (15 per class) Waynesburg University students are involved with the program each year.

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Ten Waynesburg University students will serve The Pittsburgh Project (TPP) for a weekend work camp Friday, Nov. 14, through Sunday, Nov. 16. Laurie Steere, resident director at Waynesburg University, will serve as trip leader.

Located on the north side of Pittsburgh, TPP is a Christian community development organization that serves vulnerable homeowners in neighborhoods throughout the city by providing home repairs. TPP is committed to meeting the needs of the Pittsburgh community and providing inner-city housing ministries. For several years, Waynesburg University has partnered with TPP to give homeowners a chance to save their homes as well as prevent possible citation or eviction.

Students participating will assist with general home repairs and focus on building relationships with homeowners. 

Students participating in The Pittsburgh Project service trip include:

  • Rachel Brown, senior sociology major from Pittsburgh, Pa. (South Park High School)
  • Kassi Kelly, senior criminal justice administration major from Lawrence, Pa. (Canon-McMillan High School)
  • Derrion May, junior marine biology major from Belleville, Ill. (Belleville High School East)
  • Zachary Payne, sophomore accounting major from Irwin, Pa. (Norwin High School)
  • Brenna Ross, sophomore forensic accounting major from Eighty Four, Pa. (Bentworth Senior High School)
  • Carrie Sneller, senior nursing major from Waynesburg, Pa. (Trinity High School)
  • Emily Sorton, senior pre-med major from McKeesport, Pa. (Elizabeth Forward High School)
  • Lindsey Thomas, senior accounting major from Beaver Falls, Pa. (Blackhawk High School)
  • Whitney Thomas, junior criminal justice administration major from Meyersdale, Pa. (Meyersdale Area High School)
  • Mollie Yandrick, senior psychology major from Latrobe, Pa. (Greater Latrobe High School)

For more information, contact Kelley Hardie at 724-852-3461.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Seven Waynesburg University students will serve The Pittsburgh Project (TPP) Saturday, Oct. 11. Laurie Steere, resident director at Waynesburg University, will serve as trip leader.

Located on the north side of Pittsburgh, TPP is a Christian Community Development organization that serves vulnerable homeowners in neighborhoods throughout the city by providing home repairs. TPP is committed to meeting the needs of the Pittsburgh community and providing inner-city housing ministries. For several years, Waynesburg University has partnered with TPP to give homeowners a chance to save their homes as well as prevent possible citation or eviction.

Student participating will assist with general home repairs and focus on building relationships with homeowners.

Students participating in The Pittsburgh Project service trip include:

  • Rachael Brown, senior sociology major from Pittsburgh, Pa. (South Park High School)
  • James Glisan, junior biblical and ministry studies major from West Newton, Pa. (Yough Senior High School)
  • Kassi Kelley, senior criminal justice administration major from Lawrence, Pa. (Canon-McMillan High School)
  • Brenna Ross, sophomore forensic accounting major from Eighty Four, Pa. (Bentworth Senior High School)
  • Emily Sorton, senior pre-med major from McKeesport, Pa. (Elizabeth Forward High School)
  • Whitney Thomas, junior criminal justice administration major from Meyersdale, Pa. (Meyersdale Area High School)
  • Mollie Yandrick, senior psychology major from Latrobe, Pa. (Greater Latrobe)

For more information, contact Kelley Hardie at 724-852-3461.

# # #

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Seven Waynesburg University students, led by Kelley Hardie, assistant dean of Student Services at Waynesburg University, and Chris Hardie, assistant dean of Student Services, head men’s and women’s cross country coach and assistant track coach at the University, will serve Greene County during their fall break. The Greene County Immersion service trip will run from Sunday, Oct. 12, through Saturday, Oct. 18.

The week will provide students with the opportunity to participate in an assortment of service activities in rural Greene County and will enhance the service relationships between the students and the local community. Students will serve a variety of Greene County non-profit organizations such as the Bowlby Library, Cornerstone Bible Ministry Camp, the Greene County Historical Society, Habitat for Humanity, St. Ann’s Soup Kitchen and WWJD Center.

Students participating in the mission trip include:

  • Caley Blankenbuehler, junior secondary mathematics education major from West Newton, Pa. (Yough Senior High School)
  • Theresa Butler, senior accounting major from Uniontown, Pa. (Laurel Highlands Senior High School)
  • Kara Evans, freshman computer security and forensics major from Concord, Calif. (Berean Christian High School)
  • James Glisan, junior biblical and ministry studies major from West Newton, Pa. (Yough Senior High School)
  • Rachel Moore, senior forensic accounting major from Waynesburg, Pa. (Waynesburg Central High School)
  • DeRon Scott, junior creative writing major from San Diego, Calif. (Julian Charter School)
  • Rebecca Shindelar, senior human services major from Bemidji, Minn. (Bemidji High School)

For more information, contact Kelley Hardie at 724-852-3461.

# # #

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Screen-Shot-2014-05-12-at-4.27.16-PM.pngAt a time when higher education is under the microscope, studies abound concerning which schools place the highest percentage of students in graduate schools and jobs, which lead to the highest annual income, and the list could continue. Instead of focusing on the names of institutions, however, what about looking into what students actually do during their four years?

A recent Gallup Poll did just that, finding students who “forged meaningful connections with professors or mentors” are the same people “who feel happy and engaged in their jobs [and] are the most productive” as a result.

At Waynesburg University, 93 percent of first-year students and 91 percent of seniors rated their overall experience as “excellent” or “good,” according to the University’s 2013 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) results. Additionally, NSSE reported that Waynesburg students talked about career plans with a faculty member 28 percent more than students at other Council for Christian Colleges & Universities (CCCU) schools.

What exactly does that look like? Mike Cipoletti, Director of the Forensic Science program, said he knows every student in the program, from the freshmen to the seniors—a direct result of the University’s 14:1 student/faculty ratio. Cipoletti said the seniors spend plenty of time in his office, especially close to graduation.

"That’s why most of us are here,” he said. “We come to a small institution like this, so we can have more face time and interaction with the students. It’s not even just on the academic side of things—it’s the personal interactions, too. It’s trying to help these students figure out how to become leaders, how to become service-oriented people, how to give back to their communities, and you know, that’s the best part about it.”

Provost Dr. Jacquelyn Core agrees, citing the University’s commitment to service as another way students and faculty forge close ties with one another.

“When a student is serving right alongside a faculty member, it adds more depth to the relationship, and it’s all about that ability to form relationships,” Core said. “I also think it goes both ways because it helps faculty members to feel more invested in the students, too.”

As the survey undertaken by Gallup—which polled 30,000 graduates of all ages in all 50 states—proved, Waynesburg’s mentor-like approach to teaching, academic advising and career counseling works. And the institution’s 96 percent career path rate (for those still wondering about those buzzwords) further illustrates that point.

Students are not only furthering their education in graduate schools and obtaining jobs in their respective fields, they are excelling in whatever path they choose.

Take Ryan Devlin, for example. A 2007 Waynesburg alumnus, Devlin received the honor of Pennsylvania’s 2013 “Teacher of the Year” and also became a finalist for the 2014 National Teacher of the Year Award. He, too, cites the holistic approach to a Waynesburg education as a major factor in his success.

“[Waynesburg is] just a great place where everyone is a mentor to you, and it’s not just about having a great college professor—it’s about everyone here,” Devlin said. “One of the things that’s really unique about Waynesburg University is that it really educates the entire student.”

Part of how the University “educates the entire student,” as Devlin put it, is through the school’s liberal arts philosophy. Core, in her role as Provost, is of the opinion that this approach to education is simply invaluable.

“I truly believe that you cannot put a price tag on the type of well-rounded person you can become through a liberal arts education,” Core said. “It’s really easy outside of a liberal arts background to get pigeon-holed in your field of study. You may become an expert in that field but not get the background needed to become a good citizen in all parts of society, whether that is servant leadership, environmental stewardship or whatever that might be. I think there’s a level of knowledge with a liberal arts education that makes you more conversant in a wider range of societal issues.”

For those still interested in a few of those buzzwords and rankings mentioned above, check out http://www.waynesburg.edu/ranking to learn more about Waynesburg’s recent distinctions.

 

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