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Just as March quickly faded into April like the swatches on a color wheel, graduation has become less of a dream and more of a reality. Going to Waynesburg and earning my undergraduate degree has been my life for the last four years—a life I have looked forward to and a life that has shown me I can handle more than I thought. Change is on the horizon and the more I think about it, the more nervous I become.

“What’s next?” people ask.

“I’m not sure,” I respond in honesty. 

It’s no secret to those who know me that I am not someone who embraces change easily. I have the same morning routine no matter the day of the week; I’ve gone to the same church my entire life and lived in the same town; I’ve always done what’s comfortable.

I hear my classmates talk about their plans to go on to graduate school and then get their doctorates. I’m proud of them. Their plans sound so crisp and attractive, but are those same plans for me? 

I’ve sat in my classes trying to absorb everything I can, grasping at each and every word as if they are the last remnants of some sort of ancient colony. I’ve collected those words, organized them and placed them inside a clear glass case in hopes that, one day, I can help future generations learn from and admire them as I did. Even as I go back through everything I have stored in my memory bank, my mind wildly races: am I really ready for this?

Of course you are, God answers. Have I not gotten you this far?

My faith is a constant reminder to me of what’s in store for my future, even when I have no idea where my life is going. There is no question I’m entering a time of change. My life is going to be flipped inside out, washed, pressed and hung to dry, but one thing will always remain the same: the love my Savior has for me.

"For I know the plans I have for you," declares the LORD, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.." Jeremiah 29: 11

This very verse has gotten me through my entire undergraduate career and is sure to get me through even more as I enter the new stages of my life. Even when the prospects of college, jobs, marriage, kids and a mortgage seemed like distant fairytales, God was preparing my heart for them, watching me transform into the person He wants me to be.

I know this journey is far from over, but with the things I have learned as a student at Waynesburg and in prayer, I also know I have the ability to harness my nerves so God can lead me to the place I’m meant to be.

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The Waynesburg University Bonner Scholars will host Empty Bowls Greene County Sunday, April 6, from noon to 3 p.m., at the Greene County Fairgrounds Building 9. Lunch will begin at 12:30 p.m. Cost is $20 and includes a meal, handcrafted bowl and a donation to the Weekend Food Program. Ages 12 and under eat for free, but will not receive a handmade bowl.

Empty Bowls Greene County is a luncheon and fundraiser designed to help fight hunger. Attendants will enjoy soups provided by Dan Wagner, culinary arts instructor at the Greene County Career and Technology Center, and breads provided by Rising Creek Bakery. They will also have the opportunity to select from a variety of hand-crafted ceramic bowls, made by Waynesburg University students and the local Artbeat.

Hand-crafted items by local artisans will be up for bid during a silent auction. Proceeds will benefit the Greene County Weekend Food Program. Tickets can be purchased at Artbeat and the Community Foundation of Greene County on High Street.

The event will host guest speaker Donna Dire, a Social Worker from Graysville Elementary School. Dire will share the ways in which she has seen the Weekend Food Program have a direct impact on young children and real life stories from parents and children.

Organizations such as Produce to People, Greater Pittsburgh Food Bank, AmeriCorps VISTA and Urban League – SNAP will be in attendance to educate the local community about hunger.

For questions or additional information, please contact Steven Snow at: sno3316@student.waynesburg.edu.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Nine Waynesburg University students will serve The Pittsburgh Project (TPP) for a weekend work camp Friday, April 11, through Sunday, April 13. Dave Calvario, dean of students and director of the Center for Service Leadership, will serve as trip leader.

“The Pittsburgh Project serves vulnerable homeowners in neighborhoods throughout the city by providing home repairs,” Calvario said. “It is a Christian Community Development organization.”

Located on the north side of Pittsburgh, TPP is committed to meeting the needs of the Pittsburgh community and providing inner-city housing ministries. For several years, Waynesburg University has partnered with TPP to give homeowners a chance to save their homes as well as prevent possible citation or eviction.

Students participating will assist with general home repairs and focus on building relationships with homeowners.

Students participating in The Pittsburgh Project weekend trip include:

  • Kimberly Baston, a freshman journalism major from North Huntingdon, Pa.
  • Craig Collins, a freshman biology major from Carmichaels, Pa.
  • James Glisan, a sophomore biblical ministry major from West Newton, Pa.
  • Nathan Hsueh, a junior computer security and forensics major from Mercer Island, Wash.
  • Paige Lane, a freshman athletic training major from West Lafayette, Ohio
  • Taryn Leiter, a freshman arts administration major from Erie, Pa.
  • Ben Little, a sophomore sociology major from McKeesport, Pa.
  • Hannah Szymanik, a senior special education major from Mount Holly Springs, Pa.
  • James Witte, a junior political science major from Waynesburg, Pa.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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When Ali Hulsey found out she’d be rooming with Susie Godwin prior to the girls’ freshman year at Waynesburg University, Ali figured they’d get along. What the Bakersfield, Cal., native didn’t realize is that she and Susie, of Buckhannon, W.Va., would room together all four years and become best friends in the process. Waynesburg has a way of doing that with total strangers, and below, Ali and Susie share just how it happened to them…

 

 

 

 



Ali Hulsey

Name

Susie Godwin

Senior

Class

Senior

Bakersfield, Cal.

Hometown

Buckhannon, W.Va.

The moment I stepped on campus I knew it was where I wanted to go. The people were all so friendly, and it instantly felt like home. The Education Department was great and had a lot of wonderful people working in it. Then to top it off the idea of living in the snow seemed intriguing.

Why WU?

I heard about WU from a friend who was, at the time, attending the university.  When I visited WU, I loved the campus and the friendly people. I also knew I wanted to play soccer, and Waynesburg seemed like a good fit!

Early Childhood Development and Special Education

Major

Secondary English Education

Waynesburg University Student Ambassador, Kappa Delta Pi (education honorary),
Council for Exceptional Children,
Resident Assistant,
Yellow Jackets sports fan!

Activities at WU

Women’s Soccer, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Kappa Delta Pi, Sigma Tau Delta (English honorary), DRUS (women’s honorary), Waynesburg University Student Ambassador

We really have no idea why we were paired; it was all random. I did not even fill out a roommate match sheet.  The only thing I requested was Burns Hall, which is where we were placed, but that is the only reason we can think of.

How did you become roommates?

I am from West Virginia and my roommate is from California. We were randomly assigned as roommates freshman year and have lived together ever since. I filled out a new student form and listed Elementary Education as a potential major, so that may have influenced how we became roommates.

We have done lots of traveling together, from road trips to UNC to visit her sister, flights to California to visit my family, a mission trip to Peru, and even spontaneous drives on the back roads of Waynesburg just exploring God’s beautiful creations on a nice day with the windows down and music up.

Best memory as roommates

My best memories as roommates would have to be all the soccer games and soccer related activities we experienced together. Ali was the team’s biggest fan, and I loved the memories we created throughout the soccer seasons.

Get to know him/her for who he/she is. Moving in, I hoped Susie and I would have a good relationship and such, but I never expected her to be my best friend. As I got to know her she quickly became my best friend and someone I could truly see myself living with for the rest of my college career.

Tips for incoming freshmen
who will be roommates

I would advise to be considerate and willing to share space. I would also encourage roommates to spend time together and get to know each other, as well. Getting to know a new roommate in college can be so rewarding and can lead to a lifelong friendship. Make the most out of your college experience!

COFFEE! And a lot more coffee… here in South 312 coffee is a daily staple not just for us but for all our friends, “The South Hall Family,” who often stop in and help themselves to our coffee.

Top item(s) necessary for living in the residence halls

My roommate and I love coffee, so that is a must!

Absolutely. I couldn’t imagine my college career with any other roommate, and truthfully I don’t even want to try to image that. The memories we have had and the relationship we have developed over the last four years is a greater blessing than words can ever describe. My roommate is a part of my life that I could never change.

If you had to do it all over again, would you still live together? Why?

I would do it all over again in a heartbeat! Ali and I came to college as strangers, and after four years as roommates, I am leaving college with a best friend and memories I will cherish for a lifetime.


When asked if they had anything else to add, both Alie and Susie commented on the family-like sense of community in the residence halls. They encourage all incoming students to get to know the other residents in their hall, as they can become best friends who share unforgettable memories for four years at Waynesburg and beyond.

Upon graduation, both Ali and Susie plan to pursue their master's degree in education, and they hope to stick around Waynesburg to do so. What will come of their living situation as a result? Not surprisingly, they already have an apartment lined up together in the area. They figure, after four successful years in the residence halls, they want to see what a fifth year as roommates has in store!

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As an Admissions Counselor at Waynesburg University who’s also an alumnus, I have the privilege of sharing my experience daily with prospective students and families. One of the most often asked questions is a simple one: “What’s your favorite part about Waynesburg?”

Easy.

It’s the people.

I know, I know…cliché, right? But my parents always taught me not to lie, and if I responded with any other answer, I’d be lying. So many just good, quality people who truly embody the mission of the University walk the campus each day, and that was my favorite part about being a student and remains my favorite part as a staff member.

When I talk about my student experience, I always point to how much the faculty and staff truly care about the holistic development of each student and how much they pour into the students’ lives. Students can gain so much insight from watching faculty and staff members live their lives each day, but yesterday, for this staff member, the roles were reversed as the actions of a group of students showed me what it truly means to be a part of the Waynesburg University community.

On my way home from the Admissions Office last evening, I saw a little boy, maybe four or five years old, running on a sidewalk just off campus. At first, I didn’t think much of it. Spring had just begun a few hours earlier (although it didn’t much feel like it), and the kid just wanted to be outside. Heck, I was planning to strap on the running shoes, myself, as soon as I got home.

Then, as I was almost past the boy, I noticed his feet—shoeless. All he had on was a pair of white socks. I drove a bit further and realized there were no adults or older siblings around, either. It was then that my eyes shot down to my driver’s side mirror. In the reflection, I could see the boy attempting to flag down the next two cars that passed by. Neither stopped. At that point, I immediately proceeded to the intersection straight ahead and navigated a U-turn.

I pulled up next to the boy, rolled down my window and asked if everything was OK. It became apparent right away from the boy’s reaction that everything was not “OK.” Through tears, he forced out that his mother wasn’t home, he didn’t know where she was and he didn’t know where to go. When asked if he knew exactly where home was, he could only point in a general direction.

As I decided upon a course of action, another car pulled alongside me and asked the same question I had posed to the boy: “Is everything OK?” I explained the situation, and immediately that car, along with a third vehicle, pulled off to the side of the road in front of me. Out jumped a group of four Waynesburg University students, two guys and two girls. The girls made a beeline straight for the little boy, putting their arms around him and wrapping him in an extra sweatshirt. (In my own ignorance, I had nearly failed to realize that the boy was donning just a t-shirt in temperatures that had been dropping throughout the day.)

Moments later, we made the call to University Security, who relayed our message onto the Borough Police. Within minutes, a police officer arrived to provide assistance, followed closely by two University Security personnel.

The group of students, however, did not seem to want to depart. They hovered around the scene, wanting to ensure that the boy was returned to where he needed to be. Only after I explained that University Security had assured me they needed no further assistance from us did the group of students find it permissible to leave.

As I made the short trek home, I couldn’t help but be proud of how the group of students reacted to the situation. And I couldn’t help but draw the parallel to Jesus’s parable of the Good Samaritan in the 10th chapter of Luke. Just like the priest and Levite passed by the robbed, beaten man in Biblical times, so too did two cars pass by the lost little boy, even as he was pleading for their assistance with the waving of his arms. If I hadn’t realized my initial mistake and turned around, however, I have absolutely no doubts that the group of students would have come to the aid of that little boy, much like the Good Samaritan thousands of years earlier.

How blessed, I thought, I am to work at a University where the students possess such strong morals and Godly character.

What’s my favorite part about Waynesburg?

Easy.

It’s the people.

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