Recent blog posts

b2ap3_thumbnail_5-8-Narasimhan.jpgMeet Rachel Narasimhan, a senior biology major at Waynesburg University. This summer, she will be interning at the Aloutta Sanctuary in Panama. She plans to share her experiences right here on the Waynesburg blog.

Hi! My name is Rachel Narasimhan, and I am entering my senior year at Waynesburg University. I am a biology major with a psychology minor. I am extremely interested in animal behavior, especially that of primates. I am going to be spending one month here at Aloutta Sanctuary, located on the Chiriqui Penninsula of Panama. It is a rehabilitation center as well as a field research station. Its main focus is mantled howler monkeys. 

It is my second day at the sanctuary, and I am learning and experiencing so much. The sanctuary has been doing amazing work, and has rehabbed and released over a dozen animals back into the wild. 

Right now we are home to two capuchin monkeys, Angie and Ace, two Geoffroy’s Tamarins, Razorblade and Mr. T, and two baby howlers, Rugby and Stevie. I’ve gotten to work hands on with all of them, and they are a handful. The capuchins are so so so smart. Angie, who came to the sanctuary in February, was tied to a pole at a gas station for an estimated ten years. She is very friendly and sweet, but gets anxious quickly when other wild caps come around her enclosure. Ace is young and rambunctious, and is a good playmate for Angie.

The Geoffrey Tamarins do not get along, so they are housed separately. If you feed Mr. T before Razorblade, Razorblade will freak out. Alone, they are wonderful little creatures who will hop all over you when you greet them. The howlers, affectionately known here as the babies, are something else. They require the most attention and they certainly love every second of it. Stevie and her mother were electrocuted by a wire when she was very young, resulting in her mother’s death and the loss of her eyesight. I am amazed at how good of a monkey Stevie still is. She climbs fearlessly in and out of trees and keeps up with Rugby just fine.

The other interns and managers have been really welcoming and helpful with my transition, but it is a lot to handle. The bugs are biting all the time, and the heat is suffocating. My first day here, I had sort of a meltdown. I’m extremely homesick and the difficulty of living in the middle of the jungle got to me. I was on baby duty at the time. Stevie, sensing my fear and sadness, climbed into my lap and cupped my chin in her hands. We locked eyes, and I think she was trying to tell me to stick it out. I’ll never forget the look she gave me and how she made me feel so much better in that moment. I’m still having a hard time adjusting, but the monkeys make it worth it.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_1538.jpgMeet Jerry Lawman, a junior international business major at Waynesburg University. This semester, he will be interning at Bosch in Germany and will share his experiences right here on the Waynesburg blog. 

I am a junior International Business major here at Waynesburg and I am currently interning in the Controlling Department for Bosch in Ludwigsburg, Germany. I knew from the beginning that this international internship was going to be a huge step out of my comfort zone, especially because I’ve never traveled outside of the U.S. 

It was my first flight overseas and I arrived in Stuttgart, Germany on January 28 with no plans on where to stay until I moved into my apartment February 1. I figured it would be a fun experience to figure everything out when I got there, and it was! I met so many helpful people. 

My first step was to get a German SIM card for my phone. From there, two men helped me book a hostel and helped me carry my luggage all the way there. I was shocked by how helpful they were. They said they have a saying in China, “If you are going to help someone, you help them all the way through.” 

After my jet lag wore off the next day, I started to explore the city of Stuttgart. It is one of the biggest cities I have ever been to. This is also the first time I have ever used public transportation, so the trains and buses took me a couple days to figure how everything worked. My stay at the hostel was a great experience, however. I met people from all over the world like Argentina, Jordan, Australia, India, Turkey and Germany as well. Many of them are now my friends on Facebook and we will probably stay in touch. 

I met many other people on the streets while exploring; because I was lost, people would help me get to where I needed to go and some of these people I am now friends with. It is just crazy how many people you meet when you go to a different country like this.  

I finally moved in to my apartment the day before I started work and my landlord was very helpful to me and helped me find out how to register at the town hall and even let me use some extra bedding because I could not pack my own bedding. It is a furnished six person shared apartment, however, and there will be all interns living here who will work for Porsche and Komet. 

They helped me find out my route for my first day of work and other things that would have been hard to do by myself. It takes me about 40 minutes to get to work and I arrive about 20 to 30 minutes early every day. I made sure to make a good first impression by wearing a suit my first day and wearing a nice shirt and tie every day after. 

I was introduced to everyone in the controlling department where I will work, and everyone speaks at least a little English so I can communicate with everyone. The first few days I started to learn some of my tasks and what I will be doing. A lot of my work will involve Excel, but the first few days I had to learn Excel in German so it was very difficult at first. 

I am trying to learn as much as I can from the two other interns, as they will be done with their internships in a couple weeks - then I will be the only intern in this department. Our main tasks include resources controlling, business planning, monthly business reporting and other controlling related activities. 

In my first week of work, I tried to show my willingness to learn and perform, as well as show them how I can be proactive and a strong team player. Being the only American in my department at Bosch is definitely a great experience to learn about cultures different from my own. 

About Bosch: Bosch home appliances is part of BSH, BSH Home Appliances Group, based in Munich, Germany. As part of the third largest appliance manufacturer in the world, Bosch has been selling high performance German-engineered major home appliances and cooking appliances in the United States since 1991. Known nationwide for raising the standards in appliance quietness, efficiency and integrated design, Bosch frequently receives top ratings in leading consumer publications and is the winner of the 2011, 2012 and 2013 Energy Star® Sustained Excellence Award. With U.S. headquarters in Irvine, CA, the company operates an appliance park in New Bern, North Carolina, comprised of state-of-the-art factories for dishwashers, ranges, ovens and cooktops.


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For some of the students with which you work, the question of whether to attend a secular or Christian institution may be an important part of their decision process. This can be a difficult topic, as these students try to discern where God is leading them in the midst of such transition and change. While individuals searching for their true calling and direction in life can certainly follow God’s will at secular schools, there are advantages to attending a Christian college or university. Here are the top three…


3. Academic instruction.  In many cases, choosing a Christian institution means choosing a smaller setting. According to, 817 of the country’s religiously affiliated schools have less than 5,000 students. And nearly 400 of those have less than 1,000. So what’s that mean for your academics? It means smaller class sizes, more hands-on learning opportunities and much more individualized attention from faculty. Also, often times, those professors will share the Christian perspective on the subject matters they teach (after laying out all of the other viewpoints, as well), allowing students to explore and discover in an informed manner.

2. Service opportunities.  Matthew 20:28 reads, “…the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve…”  Thus, it’s no surprise that the types of institutions that bear Christ’s name provide boundless opportunities for their students to serve the world around them. Whether it’s traveling halfway across the globe to work with impoverished youth or giving back locally with the vocational skills learned in the classroom and laboratory, these experiences prove life altering for so many. And the best schools will seek not only to provide these outlets at their respective institutions, but also to equip their students for a lifetime of servitude for the glory of God.

1. Students' holistic development.  To many (including myself!), the No. 1 reason to consider a Christian college or university is the opportunity to develop holistically as a person. From top to bottom, teh faculty and staff at these institutions care about so much more than just what letter goes down in the grade book. They pour their heart, soul and precious time into students to ensure that they're not only better job prospects, but that they're also better men and women of God. And at a time when fiscal responsibility is on the top of everyone's priority list, that type of college experience is a value that's worth every single penny.


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b2ap3_thumbnail_XC-service-project.jpgWith December upon us, the fall athletic season is either in the books or nearing completion for collegiate programs all across the country. At Waynesburg University, all of those varsity athletic teams recently wrapped up their 2014 campaigns, and the squads produced no shortage of success.


Two of these teams—football and women’s cross country—excelled both on and off the field (or course).


Football earned a share of second place in the Presidents’ Athletic Conference (PAC) by defeating previously unbeaten Washington and Jefferson in the regular season finale. The Yellow Jackets qualified for an Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) bowl game for the fourth consecutive season, hosting one of the contests for the second time in three years.


When the PAC announced its all-conference teams, Waynesburg landed 17 players on the squads, including a league-best five first-team offensive selections. The Yellow Jackets, who finished 8-3 overall, also took home the PAC Team Sportsmanship Award.


In the classroom, three players were named to the CoSIDA Capital One Academic All-District 4 Division III Football Team, and two of those players—senior John Sikora and junior Mike Lopuchovsky—were honored as Academic All-Americans.


Women’s cross country finished second at the PAC Championships, falling just short of dethroning now-26-time champion Grove City. Individually, six runners earned All-PAC status at the event, including three first-team honorees, and head coach Chris Hardie was named Coach of the Year.


The future certainly looks bright for the Yellow Jackets, too, as four of their All-PAC performers were freshmen and one was a sophomore. One of those freshmen, Julie Gerber, led the charge by finishing second overall.


Off the course, the Yellow Jacket women teamed up with the men’s squad to complete a service project in Gettysburg (see above photo).


Football and cross country were not the only Waynesburg teams to experience success this fall, either. Here are a few other achievements, both on and off the field, of the Yellow Jacket athletic program:

  • Men’s soccer qualified for the PAC Championship Tournament for the first time since the current format began back in 2005.
  • Women’s soccer qualified for the ECAC Division III South tournament.
  • Volleyball hosted its annual Dig Pink match to benefit breast cancer research and prevention.

To learn more about Yellow Jacket athletics, visit


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Paul R. Stewart Museum

Did you know that Waynesburg University has its very own museum? The basement of Miller Hall is dedicated to the historic preservations of this University. After taking a stroll through the museum, I took a moment to ponder why I hadn’t gone to see it sooner in my college career! There are so many interesting artifacts like course catalogues from the 1800s, drawings from one of the first female graduates and an old football used to win the championship game decades ago. Even though current students weren’t a part of those times, we are still connected and folded into the purpose of this institution. It was fascinating to see how much the University has grown since 1849 and how the traditions from that era have remained steady and strong.

Read the syllabus AND keep it handy

Let me make this very clear. The syllabus is your best friend. Do not make the mistake of shoving it far into the bottom of your backpack on the first day of class and never looking at it again. Keep a syllabus for each class handy so you can refer back to it when necessary.

*True Story* - Recently, I had a professor who started handing out an exam immediately after walking into the classroom. Unfortunately, most of the class, including myself, did not remember there was an exam that day. The professor proceeded to explain that the *syllabus* has every exam clearly listed out for the entire semester. Don’t be the student to make this same mistake! Read the syllabus, highlight and mark down dates in your planner. Your future self will thank you.

Seniors, take your resume to Marie Coffman

If you’re like me and the sound of the word “resume” makes you shudder in despair, I suggest you take a trip to the third floor of Stover and knock on Marie Coffman’s door. She is the Director of Career Services and Placement and is an aid to any student who needs help with resumes, cover letters, references, etc. After speaking to several of my classmates, I felt strongly encouraged to seek her assistance with my future career planning. Waynesburg University has a plethora of people who are here to help students. Utilize these resources while you can!

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