Waynesburg University will host summer Visitation Days for transfer students, high school students and their families Friday, June 26, and Friday, July 17.

“It is an important step for prospective candidates for admission and their families to visit on these summer visitation days to learn about our mission and commitment to academic excellence and outcomes,” said Jessica Sumpter, director of admissions at Waynesburg University. “Through these events, visiting families will discover the value of the Waynesburg University experience.”

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. in Roberts Chapel both days. After check-in, students will have the opportunity to meet with faculty and staff in their elected majors, learn about admissions and financial aid, take a tour of the campus and enjoy lunch in the Benedum Dining Hall.

The purpose of Visitation Days is to provide prospective students and their families with the opportunity to experience Waynesburg University. For many students, this is their first visit to campus, so it is important that they get a chance to tour it, meet with professors and learn more about the admissions and financial aid processes. 

Approximately 1,400 students are currently enrolled in Waynesburg University’s undergraduate programs. More than 70 academic concentrations are offered at the University, which maintains its status as one of the least expensive private institutions in Pennsylvania.

For more information or to register for a summer Visitation Day, call 1-800-225-7393.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Waynesburg University’s Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) will offer Level I Summer Institute, a free professional development opportunity featuring methods and materials from the Library of Congress. 

Level I Summer Institute will take place Monday, June 29, to Wednesday, July 1, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Waynesburg University’s main campus. Participants will earn up to 15 PDE Act 48 Activity Hours.

All educators are invited to explore online resources by expanding their understanding of the Library of Congress and discovering effective strategies for teaching with primary sources. 

The program will include an overview of the Library of Congress TPS Program, a tutorial of how to select and use the free digitized collections of primary sources from www.loc.gov and instruction of aligning existing classroom activities with Common Core Standards. 

Interactive strategies and methods, ready-to-use classroom activities and project development and collaboration will also be offered. 

Lunch is included. To register, visit: https://forms.waynesburg.edu/machfoh orm/view.php?id=365230

For more information, contact Sue Wise, associate director of the TPS Program at Waynesburg University, at swise@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3377.

Funded by a grant from the Library of Congress, TPS at Waynesburg University provides professional development for in-service and pre-service teachers. TPS at Waynesburg University works with schools, universities, libraries and foundations to help teachers throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania use the Library's digitized primary sources to enrich their classroom instruction.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Jenny-Schouppe.jpgJennifer Schouppe, a junior communication major with a focus in journalism and electronic media from Beaver, Pa., was recently named the winner of the 2015 Teresa Spatara Memorial Scholarship. 

The Pennsylvania Women’s Press Association (PWPA) offers the Teresa Spatara Memorial Scholarship to current junior, senior and graduate students pursuing a career in print journalism. The scholarship is named in honor of Teresa Spatara, a career journalist with The Herald in Sharon, Pa., who passed away in 2013. 

“I’m very honored to receive this scholarship,” said Schouppe. “I’m thankful for my professors who bring their real-world experiences from the field into the classroom. Their teachings and advice definitely had a part in helping me to achieve this accomplishment.” 

Schouppe, Waynesburg University’s first recipient of the scholarship, met all of the scholarship requirements including proven journalistic ability, dedication to a newspaper career and general merit. 

Schouppe recently received the position as the chief photographer for Waynesburg University’s award-winning student news publication, the Yellow Jacket. She is the programming director for Waynesburg University’s Society of Professional Journalists student chapter and an intern at McMillen Photography. 

“Winning the PWPA scholarship is a wonderful recognition of Jenny’s hard work both in her journalism classes and with the student newspaper,” said Brandon Szuminsky, instructor of communication and co-advisor for the Yellow Jacket. “As she heads into her senior year, we feel strongly that Jenny is going to be an integral part of the Yellow Jacket next year, and it’s good to see the PWPA shares our high opinion of her.”

Schouppe’s scholarship will wrap up an award-filled semester for Waynesburg University’s journalism program.

“Jenny’s scholarship is a wonderful capper to a great semester for the journalism program at Waynesburg University that saw the newspaper staff win six state and regional awards,” said Szuminsky. “It’s a great confirmation that a student can have both the myriad of benefits of a small-school education and still have great opportunities to grow as young journalists.” 

Schouppe was awarded $1,500. She will attend the PWPA luncheon on May 30 in Gettysburg to give a brief acceptance speech.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_5-15Ohio-Honors_Payne-Wissler.jpgWaynesburg University has selected Payne Wissler of Chillicothe, Ohio, as the recipient of the Jeffrey and Regina Taussig Ohio Honors Scholarship. 

The prestigious award is given to one Ohio high school student interested in a career in mathematics or one of the sciences, and pays the complete tuition, room and board for the student’s four years at Waynesburg University. Through this scholarship, more than $120,000 is awarded to each recipient over the course of his or her four years at Waynesburg.

In addition to being an Ohio resident, recipients must display extraordinary academic, service and leadership skills. The recipient must also major in one of the areas of math or science.

Wissler demonstrates the ways in which he parallels the University’s commitment to faith, learning and service through his involvement with a number of extra-curricular and volunteer activities including Fellowship of Christian Students; national honor society; orchestra; student council; athletics; 4-H; Young Life; and tutoring and mentoring students in high-risk, low-income neighborhoods, among many others. In addition, Wissler holds a 4.267 GPA, which includes a number of honors courses. 

An active member of Walnut Street United Methodist Church for more than 10 years and a Sunday school teacher and Vacation Bible School leader for more than six years, Wissler has proven his natural gift of leadership, his commitment to his faith and the importance he places as serving as a positive role model.

“He is loved by children, respected by adults, and looked up to by his peers,” said Lori Lossie, Lead Pastor at Walnut Street United Methodist Church.

For Wissler, being selected as the recipient has changed the way he views his undergraduate education, he said.

“Because the scholarship covers both room and board, I will be able to focus on advancing my education, my faith and my service to the community without many of the burdens that college students typically face,” he said.

Wissler calls the scholarship an “enormous blessing” and is inspired by donors Jeffrey and Regina Taussig.

“Their generosity is life changing and their belief in Waynesburg University is one of the many reasons I chose Waynesburg University,” he said. “I hope to one day be able to set up a scholarship for a student as a legacy like the Taussigs were generous enough to do for me and many others. The words ‘thank you’ cannot completely capture the gratitude I wish to express to the Taussigs, but through my hard work and dedication while at Waynesburg I will strive to honor their generous blessing.”

Wissler credits the university’s “state of the art science facilities, acclaimed faculty and staff, and authentic and friendly students,” as additional reasons for his choice and confidence in Waynesburg.

“I am so excited to begin this next chapter of life at Waynesburg University,” Wissler said. I look forward to spending the next four years diving into all that Waynesburg University has to offer.”

Upon graduation, Wissler plans to pursue a career in dentistry.

Wissler is the son of Eric and Vicki Wissler. 

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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During the spring semester, a Waynesburg University education student designed and implemented a hands-on, educational program for a local preschool class as a service project, providing students with an out-of-the-box learning experience. 

Abigail Standley, sophomore early childhood education major from Gahanna, Ohio, combined a former graduate student’s memorial and the support of the Department of Education to create a sustainable program for children in the Community Action Southwest preschool program at Jefferson-Morgan Elementary School. 

Standley designed and presented a supplemental gardening unit for her preschool classroom, during which the students planted flower seeds and took a field trip to a nearby greenhouse, where they learned about gardening and growing plants.

The project began with a conversation between Standley and Pam Abbe, tutor coordinator and director of the Knox Learning Center at Waynesburg. Abbe’s daughter, Leah Abbe Zwerver, passed away June 14, 2008, after completing graduate studies at the University. Abbe developed a fund in her daughter’s memory with the goal of providing support to Waynesburg University Student Services for one-on-one cultural and environmental experiences between University students and public school students.

Standley decided to honor the goals of this memorial fund with her service learning project at the preschool. She worked closely with Debra Clarke, chair of the Department of Education and assistant professor of education, to develop and carry out the idea. Clarke attests that the process, in addition to working toward an admirable cause, helped Standley grow immensely as a student and servant.

All education majors at the University receive field placements each semester in a local classroom, where they are expected to assist the classroom teacher and complete tasks assigned by the teacher. 

“The project was intended to provide a special experience for the children at the field placement and to honor the memory of a former Waynesburg University student and local community member,” said Clarke. “Many, many hours of service were dedicated to the project planning and implementation. Standley learned a lot as she worked on the special service project.”

While field placements for sophomore level education students only require 12 weeks of twice a week, two-hour sessions in their assigned classroom, Standley plans to continue her service project for the duration of her time at the University.

“My entire goal of this project for this semester was to start out small and grow big by the time I graduate in 2017,” said Standley. “My ultimate goal is to have this be a permanent service project on campus in which all University students can participate. This would consist of University students going into local school districts to give them out-of-the-box opportunities within their educational experience.”

According to Clarke, Standley has exemplified the goals of the Department of Education, which aims to reflect the University’s mission of faith, learning and service in all activities.

“The Department of Education’s mission is to prepare teachers who embrace learning and dedicate themselves to service and leadership in the profession,” said Clarke. “Standley certainly embraced learning and developed quality leadership skills as she dedicated her efforts to the service activity."

As Standley continues to strengthen the relationship between the University and local schools, Clarke foresees the benefits of the initiative both for Standley’s future and for the future of the Department of Education.

“Standley learned to persevere, to be flexible, and to be open to the ideas of others. Overall, she acquired numerous planning and preparation skills that she will use as she completes her final two years of study in the Department of Education and prepares to move into her own classroom,” said Clarke. “Her project will serve as a role model for future students as they work to maximize the learning and service opportunities provided through the Department of Education's field experience requirements.”

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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