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Waynesburg University’s third annual Merit Badge University, planned for Saturday, Oct. 31, 2015, will provide Boy Scouts with the opportunity to earn merit badges while being exposed to a wide spectrum of academic disciplines by qualified faculty and staff at Waynesburg University.

The one-day event will take place on the campus of Waynesburg University from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and will offer 31 merit badges, including Aviation, Cycling, Engineering, Environmental Science, Indian Lore and Scouting Heritage. For a complete list of merit badges or to register, visit 

Cost for the day is $10 and includes lunch, a Class B shirt, a patch and instruction by Waynesburg University faculty. Space will not be held for Scouts until payment is made. All spaces are first come, first served. Walk-in registrants will be accepted as space allows, but shirts and patches are not guaranteed. Registration is limited to 300 scouts.

Adult participants who plan to attend merit badge sessions must be in Class A/Field Uniform and must present evidence of their BSA registration and current Youth Protection Training. Alternate activities will be provided for adult participants who do not wish to accompany scouts to badge sessions or who are not appropriately registered with the BSA.  

The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) is one of the nation's largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizations. The BSA provides a program for young people that builds character, trains them in the responsibilities of participating citizenship and develops personal fitness.

For more information, visit the website above or contact 724-852-7660.

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Posted by on in Alumni

b2ap3_thumbnail_Mary-Pust_20150728-170155_1.jpgA love of athletics, a desire for being a part of a career based around community and an interest in wellness and the medical field have blended to create an ideal vocation for Mary (Sallach) Pust, a 2013 Waynesburg University athletic training alumna.

Pust currently serves as a licensed athletic trainer for a North Carolina hospital where she does outreach work at a local 1A high school/middle school. Her daily responsibilities include working at the school, being part of committees at the hospital, as well as being a part of educational seminars in the hospital and around the community. Far from the stereotype of an individual responsible for taping ankles and keeping athletes hydrated, Pust is always on her toes, daily utilizing some aspect of her Waynesburg University education.

Prepared both in the classroom and through a “vast array of clinical settings,” Pust’s multitude of hands-on experiences has not only led to the development of the critical skills necessary for a fast-paced field, but is also to credit for her confidence in her abilities.

“In this profession, the more experience you have, the better off you will be,” she said. “I am working in the middle of the Appalachian Mountains with no one around me. I learned not only how to be a great athletic trainer, but how to be self-sufficient, have confidence and know when to ask for outside help.”

Pust acknowledges that her own experiences with injury as an athlete have also played a part in her journey. Requiring her to spend more time in the training room, Pust’s injuries also became blessings in disguise as she developed lasting relationships with her high school athletic trainer and sports medicine physician.

Ironically, those relationships inspired Pust to want to become the same type of mentor she was fortunate enough to have. Working with kids in grades 7-12, Pust has the opportunity to make a difference in countless ways.

“My biggest goal every day when I go in to work is to be a positive role model for the kids I work with,” she said.

Pust also puts a special emphasis on education and prioritizes teaching parents, coaches and the community about topics including emergency action plans, concussions, nutrition, health insurance, strength and conditioning, among many others.

“My profession has the rare opportunity to work with individuals every day. I see their highs, their lows, get to know families, and become part of a community,” she said.

Pust said many Waynesburg professors influenced her path, challenging her to relate her textbooks to real life and pushing her to “know more than [she] thought [she] needed at the time.”

Pust said she not only left Waynesburg feeling professionally prepared, but also had the opportunity to experience spiritual growth.

“Waynesburg helped me find myself as a Christian in this modern world. I explored different denominations and was introduced to many ideas, concepts and beliefs. It was being able to share one main goal of serving and praising God with others that really gave me a connection to the school,” she said.

As a result, Pust said she found her light and “will continue to let [it] shine."

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Waynesburg University recently created an affiliation agreement with the West Virginia University (WVU) School of Medicine with the goal of enhancing placement opportunities for Waynesburg graduates.

According to Dr. Jacquelyn Core, provost and vice president for Academic Affairs at Waynesburg University, the main benefit to participating in these agreements is the opportunity to make early connections between the students and the people who may ultimately make the final decision on their admission status into a graduate program. 

Participating students will be matched with a faculty mentor from the WVU School of Medicine to help them navigate and prepare for the application process and a future in medicine. Participating students are also guaranteed an interview during the admissions process, as long as they maintain a specified GPA and receive satisfactory MCAT or GRE scores. 

“The interview is everything,” said Core. “There will be lots of qualified applicants, but if you cannot get the interview, there is no way to advance, so the guaranteed interview is a really big deal.” 

Core added that the University has connected with additional schools with graduate-level engineering, law, physical therapy, occupational therapy and physician assistant programs to establish similar agreements. She hopes agreements with these programs will come into fruition soon.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or

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Waynesburg University will present “Relationships: An Evening of Short Plays about Love and Romance,” Friday, July 31, and Saturday, Aug. 1, at 7:30 p.m. in the Goodwin Performing Arts Center (GPAC) on the Waynesburg University campus. Admission is $5 per person, and the public is cordially invited to attend. 

“The GPAC will be alive with humorous and touching plays about falling in love, proposing marriage, finding new relationships and the pitfalls that come with these scenarios,” said Edward L. Powers, director of the theater program and professor of theater at Waynesburg University. 

Waynesburg University alumni, current students and community members will come together to perform the short plays. The production will include two shows, “The Kentucky Marriage Proposal” by Alice H. Houstle and “The Dancers” by Horton Foote, in addition to several two- and three- person scenes. 

The selected stories will feature a honeymooning couple experiencing their first fight, a farmer’s marriage proposal to his neighbor’s daughter, two college graduates wondering if marriage is right for them, a lonely man’s attempts to rekindle a past relationship and two teenagers’ discovery of the overall unimportance of popularity.   

“We're excited to have familiar faces from the community returning to our stage, but equally as excited about so many area high school students who are new to our Waynesburg University theater program.”

Tickets will be available at the door.  For more information, contact Powers at 724-852-3226.

The cast includes:

  • Tome J. Custer
  • Michael Winland
  • Ian M. Bish
  • Ellen M. Weekly
  • Laura Gonnella
  • Jeromy Mackey
  • Morgan N. Seely
  •  Jordan Thompson
  • Caleb Jackson
  • Claire V. Needes
  • Cole Leathers
  • Sarah Snee
  • Sydney Shultz
  • Bradley Gillespie

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or

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Guy Montecalvo has joined Waynesburg University as the program coordinator for the Athletic Administration and Coaching option of the University’s Master of Education (M.Ed.) program. 

Montecalvo, former athletic director of the Canon-McMillan School District, is a well-respected and experienced member of the athletic community.

With nearly four decades of experience in coaching, physical education and athletic administration, Montecalvo brings to Waynesburg an impressive background. Prior to his position at Canon-McMillan, he was a teacher and the head football and track and field coach for Washington School District. 

Among his many awards and honors are the 2014 PSADA Region 4 Athletic Director of the Year (2014), the Post-Gazette All-Star Educator Award (1991), the NAACP Human Rights Award (2003) and WPIAL Coach of the Year (1993, 2001). He is also an eleven-time recipient of the Washington/Greene County Coach of the Year award and has been the featured speaker at numerous football and track clinics including the Ohio State Clinic, the Penn State Clinic, the West Virginia Clinic, PSADA Conference, the PSFCA Football Clinic, the Western Pa. Track Clinic and numerous Division 2 and 3 schools.

Dr. Helen McCracken, director of Graduate Education Programs at Waynesburg University and former superintendent at the Canon-McMillan School District, worked closely with Montecalvo for several years prior to joining Waynesburg. 

“I can attest to Coach Montecalvo’s passion for athletics, his commitment to making a difference in the lives of young people, and his overall contributions to our community through the integrity he consistently embodied,” Dr. McCracken said. “I am pleased and honored to be working with him again. I look forward to providing a stellar program that can put forth the same levels of sound educational philosophies and dedication to the success of members of the athletic community that he exemplified during the several years of our previous working relationship.”

According to Montecalvo, in Pennsylvania, there is no mandatory certification for the position of athletic administrator. Additionally, other than Concussion and Sudden Cardiac Arrest Certification, there are no educational requirements for men and women who coach at the interscholastic level.  

“After serving in both roles for many years, I feel that there is an urgent need to prepare prospective educators who wish to pursue this level of work,” Montecalvo said. “Our program will address the need that has developed to support new athletic administrators to adequately handle the complexities of the position, as well as provide professional development for the experienced athletic administrator.”

The M.Ed. Program’s Athletic Administration and Coaching option provides comprehensive training to coaches to assist them in meeting the new PIAA Coaching and First Aid requirement that goes into effect July 2016. 

Current and prospective coaches are also offered the opportunity to earn credits toward their Instructional II certificate as well as in-depth programming on the concepts of sports law, contemporary issues in athletics, sports budget and fiscal practices, event and facilities management, fundraising, and coaching and first aid.

Beyond preparing students, Montecalvo believes the program will position graduates to exceed expectations in the job market. 

“We feel that our students will enhance their ability and be given an edge over competitors in securing jobs in this market,” said Montecalvo. 

The courses will be offered at the University’s Southpointe location and will be held for eight-week periods on weekday evenings from 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

For more information, contact Montecalvo at

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or

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