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Experience a variety of musical talents Thursday, Nov. 14, as the Waynesburg University music program offers the second Chamber Works concert of the semester. The concert will be held at noon in the Marsh Center in Roberts Chapel. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend.

The lunchtime concert will include performances by the Chamber Orchestra, Woodwind Ensemble, Brass Ensemble, Percussion Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, Beauty Shop & Barber Shop Quartets and the Lamplighters Touring Choir.

“The performance happens in a very relaxed environment,” said Alejandro Pinzon, lecturer of music at Waynesburg University. “The audience is not expected to do anything but enjoy a variety of ensembles, different types of instruments or voice and diverse musical styles.”

The audience is encouraged to bring a lunch and enjoy the hour-long event. For more information, contact Ronda DePriest at rdepries@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3420.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Kenya4194-handing-over-2.jpgSeveral hundred people in Kenya have access to clean water because of Alex Tenenbaum and his drive to positively affect those dying due to a lack of basic needs.

The junior information technology major at Waynesburg University led the EcoStewards Club in raising several thousand dollars for The Water Project in an effort to provide clean water to a primary school in Bukhaywa, located in western Kenya. With a population of 760 students, 18 teachers and three sub-ordinate staff, the school had previously gotten water from a stream.

Water collected from the stream was not clean, and it was two kilometers away.

The project involved the repair of a hand-dug well, which served the community and school from 1994 to 2006, when it was contaminated and later vandalized.

Co-sponsored by the EcoStewards Club, Tenenbaum and other members of the organization raised $5,050 within three months, and within three months from reaching their monetary goal, they had confirmation of project completion in pictures.

“The whole project was a challenge,” Tenenbaum said, “but I just kept in mind my goal. It was all about the kids there – not about me and the struggles I went through to make this happen. When I saw the pictures, the smiling faces of all those people over there, it really hit home.”

With one of those pictures now adorning the wall of his dorm room, Tenenbaum needs only to look at it for motivation for his new project – another well in another part of Africa. As he manages his busy schedule of classes, preparing to study abroad in Italy next semester, working ten hours a week and attending EcoStewards Club meetings, Tenebaum continues to reserve time for his passion, in hopes of funding the repair of another well by the end of this semester.

“When people ask me, ‘Who are you impacting?’ My first thought is the world.” Tenebaum said. “It might sound crazy, but we really did. We made a difference.”

Tenenbaum has hopes it will be easier for him this time around – he is enrolled in fundraising and environmental biology courses with the goal of learning more about how to reach his goal and of the effects his project could have.

“Plus, I can tell people, I did this before. I already raised $5,050 once. I can do it again,” he said.

One of Tenebaum’s life goals is to use his God given talents and the knowledge he gains at Waynesburg University through his information technology major and sociology minor to help the disadvantaged.

“I want to use technology to make a difference,” Tenebaum said. “I’m not sure how I’m going to do that yet, but I’m confident I’ll figure it out.”

Some would say he already has.

For more information, contact Tenebaum at ten6901@student.waynesburg.edu.

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The Rev. Dr. Donald J. Dawson, director of World Mission Initiative (WMI) at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, will present his lecture, “Answering God’s Call,” as part of the Christ & Culture Lecture Series, Tuesday, Nov. 12, at 7 p.m. in Roberts Chapel on the campus of Waynesburg University. Admission is free, and the public is invited to attend. 

In addition to his lecture, Dawson will speak Tuesday at 11 a.m. in Roberts Chapel. 

Dawson had 24 years of pastoral experience leading churches in mission involvement before beginning as director of the WMI in 2000. He was pastor of the Buffalo United Presbyterian Church in Sarver, Pa., and the Hampton Presbyterian Church in Gibsonia, Pa.

Dawson also serves as the director of the New Wilmington Mission Conference (NWMC). The NWMC has mobilized the church for mission for 108 years and uses its Presbyterian mission heritage to encourage a deep spiritual life of fellowship with God by promoting service and witness for Jesus Christ.

The WMI fosters an environment of mission work and is committed to raising a generation who will lead the church in rediscovering its identity as the sent people of God.  

 

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_best-colleges-RU-Best-Value.pngWaynesburg University was recently selected by U.S. News & World Report as a Best Value School – Regional Universities (North) in the 2014 “U.S. News Best Colleges” ranking, which identifies the top 15 “Best Value Schools” in the northern region of the country.

According to U.S. News & World Report, the Best Values Schools’ calculations take into consideration the university's academic quality combined with the 2012-2103 net cost of attendance for a student who receives the average level of need-based financial aid.

As defined by U.S. News & World Report, schools named to the list are above average academically and cost considerably less than many other schools when the financial aid that they dispense, in the form of need-based grants and scholarships, is taken into account.

“At Waynesburg University, ensuring that the cost of Christian higher education remains affordable for our students has always remained a top priority,” said Douglas G. Lee, Waynesburg University President. “As the ranking indicates, Waynesburg offers an affordable yet valuable combination of rigorous academic programs as well as service and character building opportunities.”

During the 2012-2013 academic year, more than 90 percent of Waynesburg students received some form of financial aid.

The University processes aid from a wide variety of sources, including all federal, state and institutional aid programs. In the 2012-2013 year, it awarded more than $33 million in aid to its students. This aid included academic scholarships, federal, state and institutional grants, work-study opportunities and student or parent educational loans.

For first-time freshman students, the University offers two types of renewable, four-year scholarships: Achievement Awards and Competitive Merit Scholarship Programs.

Achievement Awards range between $5,000 and $15,000 annually and are based on the combination of each applicant’s cumulative high school GPA and SAT or ACT scores. This range of scholarships can cover approximately 25 to 75 percent of tuition cost. b2ap3_thumbnail_viewbook-graphic.png

Competitive Merit Scholarship Programs can cover from $2,500 to full tuition, room and board annually. These programs include the Bonner Scholarship, the Eagle Scout/Gold Award, the Jeffery and Regina Taussig Ohio Honors Scholarship and the Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership Scholarship. 

For more information on financial aid and scholarships at Waynesburg University, contact the University’s Office of Financial Aid at 724-852-3208 or finaid@waynesburg.edu.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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On October 21, 2013, Waynesburg University students enrolled in instructor of criminal justice James Tanda’s terrorism class welcomed Edward Bender, a visiting guest speaker from the National Center for Explosives Training and Research in Huntsville, Ala.

More than 100 Waynesburg University students from classes including terrorism, criminal investigations, criminal justice, forensic science, criminalistics, criminal law, white collar crime, interview & interrogation and private security attended Bender’s instructional presentation involving crime scene investigation, laboratory analysis, evidence collection and case studies globally spanning the last 25 years.

“Waynesburg students could see that expertise come through with detailed and animated descriptions of Bender’s firsthand accounts of examining the World Trade Center truck bomb and the Oklahoma City federal building bombing,” said Tanda.

Tanda and Bender worked closely together for more than 22 years in the field on bomb scenes and in explosives investigative training environments. They continue to stay close to the explosives law enforcement community as they are both contracted subject matter experts at the National Center for Explosives Training and Research.

Bender earned his bachelor’s degree from Saint Mary’s College in 1979.  His career in forensic chemistry began that same year in the Instrumental Analysis Section of the FBI Laboratory with an emphasis on explosives and trace evidence examination. He continued his career at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives National Laboratory in 1990, specializing in the chemical analysis of explosives, explosive effects and trace evidence.  After 34 years of service to the Department of Justice as an expert in his field, Bender retired from ATF’s Washington National Laboratory in 2012.

Although Bender worked on hundreds of criminal investigations at the federal, state and international levels, some of his more notable investigations included the bombing of the Embassy and Marine Corps barracks in Beirut, Lebanon, the attempted assassination of president Ronald Reagan, the “Unibomber" serial bombing case, the bombing of the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires and the 1996 TWA Flight 800 investigations.

During his Waynesburg University presentation, Bender touched on many of these historic cases with first-hand accounts and details not found in history books.

Bender has 26 peer reviewed scientific publications including contributions to three books. He has taught numerous post-blast investigation courses and has given lectures in nearly every state in the country.  He has also taught explosives investigations throughout the world including international law enforcement academies in Africa, Hungary and Thailand.

He currently teaches more than 20 classes a year for the homemade explosives course at the National Center for Explosives Training and Research as well as a pipe bomb analysis course at the Canadian Police College in Ottawa, Ontario, and the Western Regional CPC in Chilliwack, British Colombia. 

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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