b2ap3_thumbnail_HEALTH_UD_078.jpgWaynesburg University’s Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program hosted a panel discussion and debate at the University’s Monroeville center Sunday, Nov. 16. 

In an effort to promote interprofessional opportunities, the DNP Program invited six first-year medical students from the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine to participate in the debate about healthcare utilization. 

“Most professions are seeking opportunities for interprofessional development,” said Dr. Kimberly Whiteman, assistant professor and co-director of the Graduate and Professional Studies Nursing Program and DNP Program at Waynesburg University. “We don’t have a medical school and they don’t have a nursing school; this program enabled both of us to have a collaborative experience.” 

Waynesburg’s DNP Program established this event in conjunction with the Institute of Medicine’s initiative to promote “interprofessional education for collaboration.” 

“It was well received on both ends,” said Dr. Kimberly Stephens, assistant professor of nursing at Waynesburg and co-director of the DNP Program. “Both our students and theirs thought it was beneficial, and it encouraged us to continue to look for opportunities that are valuable.”

Amber Egyud, full-time chief nursing officer for Allegheny Health Network and a second-year DNP student at Waynesburg University, participated in the debate. 

“The debate helped to develop networks that foster the exchange, synthesis and application of innovation to improve healthcare outcomes,” she said. “The benefit of interprofessional collaboration is the ability to share professional competence and experience to improve healthcare outcomes.” 

Waynesburg University's 36-credit Doctor of Nursing Practice program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, D.C., 20036, 202-887-6791. It is offered at the Monroeville Center. Each course meets one weekend every other month in the 15-week semester, with learning activities and assignments to be completed between seminars. 

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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11-12-megan-bayles.jpgWaynesburg University’s Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) Chapter president Megan Bayles recently received first place in a national public relations scholarship competition. 

Bayles, a junior public relations major from Carmichaels, Pa., is the first student from Southwestern Pennsylvania to have received the Betsy Plank PRSSA Scholarship. The award is granted annually to three public relations students who demonstrate dedication to the field, practical experience, academic excellence and proven leadership. 

“This scholarship award is one of the most distinguished student awards given by PRSSA,” said Richard Krause, chair of the Department of Communication, assistant professor of communication and faculty adviser to the PRSSA Chapter. “This award affirms all that Megan has accomplished in our chapter in a very short period of time.” 

Winners were recently announced at the PRSSA National Conference in Washington, D.C. For first place, Bayles received a $5,000 award.

“The entire event felt surreal. I was happy, excited, proud and honored, all at the same time,” Bayles said. “Since discovering all of the PRSSA scholarship opportunities and joining Waynesburg's Chapter, it has been my goal to apply for and win one of these prestigious awards.” 

Betsy Plank was the first woman to lead the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) President in 1973. She was chair of the U.S. Section of International Public Relations Association and co-chaired the 1987 commission to develop guidelines for the undergraduate public relations curriculum in U.S. colleges and universities.

“Betsy Plank is an inspiration to all aspiring public relations professionals, especially women,” Bayles said. “To have been awarded the opportunity to help carry on her amazing legacy is such a blessing.”   

Upon graduation from Waynesburg University, Bayles hopes to work in corporate public relations and obtain a Master’s degree in a communication-related field.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Waynesburg University will send 45 undergraduate nursing and pre-med students to the Women’s Health Conversations Conference Thursday, Nov. 6, at the Westin Convention Center Ballroom in Pittsburgh, Pa.

Almost 1,000 women and 50 speakers from across the country will attend the annual conference, which will run from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The conference includes sessions and classes including book signings; breast cancer awareness; concussion discussions; a diabetes panel; diet and exercise expertise; the art of medicine; the healthcare system; stress, risk and sleep issues and more. 

Students will also have the opportunity to attend a networking event to connect with healthcare leaders from around the region. 

Waynesburg students will volunteer at the conference in various coordination roles such as scribes, greeters and VIP handlers. In appreciation of their service, the conference waived the admission fee for all Waynesburg students. 

“This is a great opportunity for our students to participate in service while also being exposed to leaders in their field and hear the latest information on topics related to their studies,” said Mary Cummings, vice president for Student Services at Waynesburg University.   

Women's Health Conversations (WHC), founded by nationally recognized orthopedic surgeon Dr. Vonda Wright, will encourage women to fortify their bodies, build better brains and create bliss to live vital, active and joyful lives. 

WHC was established in September 2013 with the belief that today's generation of women can transform our nation's health for the betterment of all women and the world. 

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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RJ_20141105-144921_1.jpgIn support of RJ Tonks, a senior sports management major and marketing minor at Waynesburg University, business students held Rise Up for RJ Saturday, Nov. 1, during half time of the football game. President Douglas G. Lee, as well as members of the Waynesburg University Business Club, presented Tonks with a check for $8,000 at the game.

After the check was created, donations continued to pour in, totaling $8,322 at last count for Tonks’ treatments at the Carrick Brain Centers in Marietta, Ga. This far surpassed the club’s original goal of $6,000.

Ashley Clark, a senior marketing major and accounting minor from McDonald, Pa.; Joshua Dains, a senior business management major from Clarksville, Pa.; and Kaitlyn Marteney, a senior forensic accounting and criminal justice major from Berlin, Pa., spearheaded the fundraiser to help Tonks defray the costs of treatment.

The students integrated service with learning by using skills gained in their business classes.

“We designed, ordered, sold and distributed the shirts, as well as everything in between,” said Dains. “Our professors were great people to bounce ideas off of, and they proved to be an awesome support system.”

The funds raised will go toward treatment and travel costs for Tonks. When he was eight, Tonks developed a virus that left a scar on his brain. For many years, the scar impaired Tonks’ hand eye coordination, mobility, speech, balance and fine motor skills. As a freshman, Tonks became dependent on a wheelchair for mobility.

“We are all really good friends with RJ,” said Clark. “We had heard that he may not be able to go down for treatment this semester because it is very expensive. We know that RJ's goal is to walk unassisted at graduation this May, and we understand how important that is to him.”

The senior Business Club majors designed a shirt to sell to staff, faculty, students and community members. The front of the shirt read "Rise Up for RJ," while the back contains Tonks’ personal motto, the Bible verse Jeremiah 29:11. 

In total, the club sold more than 600 shirts during the six-week fundraiser.

“It's an incredible feeling to know I have support from the entire Waynesburg University community,” said Tonks. “I was amazed at how much money was raised from the sale of the shirts. I am so thankful for my classmates in the Business Club that organized the fundraiser and everyone that bought or sold a shirt.”

The students held a “black out” at the November 1 Waynesburg versus Thomas Moore football game to sell shirts as the final fundraising push. Members of the crowd purchased and wore the black shirts in a show of support.

“We have all been greatly impacted by RJ's enthusiasm, motivation and humbling personality; we wanted to do something special for him.” Clark said. “His treatment costs $5,500 for one week. This amount does not include travel expenses like food, lodging, gas, etc. We are so happy to have surpassed our goal.”

For more information, contact cla7773@student.waynesburg.edu.

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Phillips.jpgColin Philips, senior history and political science major

Public Liaison Intern, Ohio Governor’s Office in Columbus, Ohio 

When the Ohio Speaker of the House entered a meeting room in the Ohio Governor’s Office asking, “Who here goes to Waynesburg University?” Colin Philips proudly raised his hand.  

“My favorite experience was meeting with State Representative Batchelder, whose son also attends Waynesburg,” Philips said. “I had time to talk with him about Waynesburg University in front of the other interns.”

When he wasn’t meeting with prominent legislators and leaders, Philips helped with constituent affairs in the office. He handled data entry and organization of many large petitions and responded to constituent mail, all while gaining experience in a political office during a campaign year. 

Luckily, Philips is well-versed in Ohio politics as a result of last summer’s internship with Rep. Pat Tiberi from Ohio, as well as his many meetings, tours and classes as a Stover Scholar at Waynesburg. 

“My studies at Waynesburg, and especially the Stover Center, have provided me with knowledge of how one really makes an impact on those around them in a short period of time,” he said. “My studies allowed me to be knowledgeable with the things I worked on, while experiences with politicians through the Stover Center allowed me to see how to be most effective while in a political office.”

The Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership is an interdisciplinary scholarly center dedicated to bringing insights from the U.S. Constitution’s Founding Era and from Christianity to bear in the contemporary public square. Stover Scholars have outstanding opportunities to broaden their horizons and to deepen their understanding – from meetings with politicians such as U.S. Senator Bob Casey and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia to internships on Capitol Hill. 

 

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