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b2ap3_thumbnail_20150226-210032.JPGWaynesburg University’s b.f. maiz Lecture will be Monday, March 2, at 7 p.m. in Alumni Hall and will feature Dr. Toru Kiuchi. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend.

Kiuchi is a professor of English at Nihon University in Tokyo, Japan. He is currently a Fulbright Visiting Scholar doing research on Richard Wrights Haiku at Yale University.  

He is a published Haiku poet and the editor-in-chief of Ten [Sable], a Haiku magazine; a vice chairman of the Japan Association of Haiku Poets; an executive committee member and trustee of the Haiku International Association, Japan; a Japanese translator of Richard Wright’s “Haiku: This Other World”; and an author and editor of Haiku collections.

He has authored eleven books including “Richard Wright: A Documented Life, 1908-1960,” and “The Critical Responses in Japan to African American Writers.” He has also given more than 30 presentations and invited lectures at conferences in Canada, China, Egypt, France, Korea and the United States. 

The b. f. maiz Center, named after the late poet b. f. maiz, exists to continue and to amplify his lifelong concerns with poetry, peace and poetic justice. This speaker is invited to campus as part of the b.f. maiz Center’s activities.

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_1538.jpgMeet Jerry Lawman, a junior international business major at Waynesburg University. This semester, he will be interning at Bosch in Germany and will share his experiences right here on the Waynesburg blog. 

I am a junior International Business major here at Waynesburg and I am currently interning in the Controlling Department for Bosch in Ludwigsburg, Germany. I knew from the beginning that this international internship was going to be a huge step out of my comfort zone, especially because I’ve never traveled outside of the U.S. 

It was my first flight overseas and I arrived in Stuttgart, Germany on January 28 with no plans on where to stay until I moved into my apartment February 1. I figured it would be a fun experience to figure everything out when I got there, and it was! I met so many helpful people. 

My first step was to get a German SIM card for my phone. From there, two men helped me book a hostel and helped me carry my luggage all the way there. I was shocked by how helpful they were. They said they have a saying in China, “If you are going to help someone, you help them all the way through.” 

After my jet lag wore off the next day, I started to explore the city of Stuttgart. It is one of the biggest cities I have ever been to. This is also the first time I have ever used public transportation, so the trains and buses took me a couple days to figure how everything worked. My stay at the hostel was a great experience, however. I met people from all over the world like Argentina, Jordan, Australia, India, Turkey and Germany as well. Many of them are now my friends on Facebook and we will probably stay in touch. 

I met many other people on the streets while exploring; because I was lost, people would help me get to where I needed to go and some of these people I am now friends with. It is just crazy how many people you meet when you go to a different country like this.  

I finally moved in to my apartment the day before I started work and my landlord was very helpful to me and helped me find out how to register at the town hall and even let me use some extra bedding because I could not pack my own bedding. It is a furnished six person shared apartment, however, and there will be all interns living here who will work for Porsche and Komet. 

They helped me find out my route for my first day of work and other things that would have been hard to do by myself. It takes me about 40 minutes to get to work and I arrive about 20 to 30 minutes early every day. I made sure to make a good first impression by wearing a suit my first day and wearing a nice shirt and tie every day after. 

I was introduced to everyone in the controlling department where I will work, and everyone speaks at least a little English so I can communicate with everyone. The first few days I started to learn some of my tasks and what I will be doing. A lot of my work will involve Excel, but the first few days I had to learn Excel in German so it was very difficult at first. 

I am trying to learn as much as I can from the two other interns, as they will be done with their internships in a couple weeks - then I will be the only intern in this department. Our main tasks include resources controlling, business planning, monthly business reporting and other controlling related activities. 

In my first week of work, I tried to show my willingness to learn and perform, as well as show them how I can be proactive and a strong team player. Being the only American in my department at Bosch is definitely a great experience to learn about cultures different from my own. 

About Bosch: Bosch home appliances is part of BSH, BSH Home Appliances Group, based in Munich, Germany. As part of the third largest appliance manufacturer in the world, Bosch has been selling high performance German-engineered major home appliances and cooking appliances in the United States since 1991. Known nationwide for raising the standards in appliance quietness, efficiency and integrated design, Bosch frequently receives top ratings in leading consumer publications and is the winner of the 2011, 2012 and 2013 Energy Star® Sustained Excellence Award. With U.S. headquarters in Irvine, CA, the company operates an appliance park in New Bern, North Carolina, comprised of state-of-the-art factories for dishwashers, ranges, ovens and cooktops.

 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_201x201x0001q-WizardOfOz.jpg.pagespeed.ic.-fKhdTouFE.jpgWaynesburg University’s Teaching with Primary Resources Program (TPS) will hold a free online synchronous professional development series for school librarians and media specialists. Coaches Academy for Librarians will meet each Wednesday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. starting February 25 and running through April 1.

Coaches Academy for Librarians is an advanced TPS Level III course designed to help school librarians and media specialists develop the skills and knowledge to lead teachers in using Library of Congress digitized sources effectively across curriculum. Participants earn up to 20 CEU Hours (optional 10 more post-course).

The course will be facilitated by librarian and TPS Consultant, Jennifer Hanson, and is intended to help participants develop leadership skills and gain knowledge about educational uses of the Library of Congress resources. 

Participants will experience live audio chat sessions, peer collaboration and discussion and independent reading and project development. 

Participants who have not completed TPS Level I are asked to complete a pre-requisite, TPS BASICS, before September 3. Login information is provided upon registration for Coaches Academy for Librarians.   

Space is limited. Register at: https://forms.waynesburg.edu/machform/view.php?id=364493.  

For more information, contact Sue Wise, Associate Director of the TPS Program at Waynesburg University, at swise@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3377.

Funded by a grant from the Library of Congress, Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) at Waynesburg University provides professional development for in-service and pre-service teachers. TPS at Waynesburg University works with schools, universities, libraries and foundations to help teachers throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania use the Library's digitized primary sources to enrich their classroom instruction.

 

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_headshot.jpgJordan Mitrik, a junior public relations major from Pittsburgh, Pa., recently won the Bob O’Gara Student Scholarship from the Pittsburgh Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). He accepted the award at the 2015 PRSA Pittsburgh Renaissance Awards Thursday, Jan. 29. 

This is the first time that a Waynesburg student has received the award, which is given annually to one outstanding public relations student in the Pittsburgh region. Mitrik met all of the scholarship requirements including high standards of achievement in academics, involvement in extracurricular activities, evidence of personal character, leadership and citizenship and demonstrated knowledge of and interest in the profession and practice of public relations. 

“I am truly honored to represent western Pennsylvania and the participating PRSSA Chapters as the scholarship recipient,” Mitrik said. “When people mention big names in the Pittsburgh public relations market, Bob O'Gara's name is always in the mix. He is a true advocate for students and a leader in the industry. He is a role model to me and I could not be more humbled to receive this type of recognition.”

Mitrik serves as the vice president of Waynesburg’s Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) Chapter and as the director of Waynesburg University’s public relations student-run firm, Red Brick Communications. He works in the Office of University Relations as a student writer and as a recruiter for the University’s Department of Communication. 

In addition to his public relations responsibilities, Mitrik is president and captain of Waynesburg University's Men's Club Volleyball team, is a Leadership Scholar and is a member of Lambda Pi Eta,Waynesburg’s communication honor society. 

During his acceptance speech, Mitrik thanked God, his family, the Renaissance Awards Committee and Waynesburg University for his success. 

“It took determination, motivation and lots of coffee to bring me here today,” said Mitrik. “During moments of doubt, God was always involved. He placed me at Waynesburg University to experience these things and to bring me to this moment.” 

Eight members of the Waynesburg University PRSSA Chapter traveled to the event to volunteer and network. The annual ceremony celebrates the brightest stars and best work in Pittsburgh’s public relations community. 

The students arrived before the event began and assisted with set up, schedule review and prep work. During the ceremony, students managed the registration table, communicating with more than 150 public relations practitioners from the Pittsburgh area. Members were also responsible for handing out the awards to the winners. 

This is the third consecutive year the Waynesburg Chapter sent members to work the event after establishing a close connection with its parent Chapter, PRSA Pittsburgh.  

Chartered in 2010, the award-winning Waynesburg University Chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America strives to prepare members for their future profession through experience, opportunity and achievement.

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) recently notified Waynesburg University of its selection to the President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll. This is the University's seventh consecutive year receiving the honor.

The President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll is the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to community, service-learning b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_0573.JPG and civic engagement. CNCS is a federal agency that improves lives, strengthens communities and fosters civic engagement through service and volunteering.

“Receiving this award for the seventh year in a row demonstrates the continued commitment of our students, faculty and staff to live out the service component of our mission by engaging in our community," said Mary Cummings, vice president of Student Services. “By integrating service with the academic programs at our University, we prepare our students for a life of community engagement not only during their undergraduate experience, but after graduation as well.”

The Honor Roll, launched in 2006, recognizes institutions of higher education that support exemplary community service programs and raise the visibility of effective practices in campus community partnerships. Honorees for the award were chosen based on a series of selection factors including scope and innovation of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service and the extent to which academic service-learning courses are offered.


b2ap3_thumbnail_ryersonservice2.jpgWaynesburg University students contribute more than 50,000 service hours annually. Through its more than 50 local and regional agencies and a continuously expanding network of international agencies, Waynesburg University encourages students to become servant-leaders through a number of partnerships.

The University offers approximately 16 service mission trips per academic year. The trips are held during the fall, winter, spring and summer breaks. The University also participates in a number of weekend-long service projects in the local community and beyond.

In addition to volunteer hours, the University offers a service leadership minor constructed around service-learning courses. During the semester-long courses, students perform a set amount of hours of community service with a non-profit organization.

The University is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar Schools in the country. With support from the Corella and Bertram F. Bonner Foundation, Waynesburg is committed to the program which was created to offer scholarship assistance to students performing significant amounts of community service throughout their time at Waynesburg. Approximately 60 (15 per class) Waynesburg University students are involved with the program each year.

 

 

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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