b2ap3_thumbnail_bob-randolph.jpgThe Department of English at Waynesburg University will host “Pass the Biscuits” at the First Presbyterian Church of Waynesburg Wednesday, Feb. 26, from 7:30 to 9 p.m., to raise money for the Corner Cupboard Food Bank in Waynesburg. 

"Pass the Biscuits" is a response by Dr. Bob Randolph, writer in residence at Waynesburg University, and the Department of English at Waynesburg University to the Day of Service planned in honor of Waynesburg University President Douglas G. Lee and his upcoming inauguration.

The event, held a few days before the Day of Service, will showcase the strengths of the Department of English as faculty members will read poetry and essays.  Rev. Carolyn Poteet, director of faith and mission at Waynesburg University, will pray at the event and students will perform music.

Attendance is encouraged for students, faculty, staff and members of the Waynesburg community. Admission is free and a collection will be taken to support the Corner Cupboard’s work.  The Waynesburg Giant Eagle will match the amount raised at the benefit up to $500.

"It is wonderful to me that people are willing to share their strengths, in this case writing, music and prayer, to come together and help others who need it,” Randolph said. “That's a joyful thing; it has been, and still remains, the spirit of Waynesburg University.  It should be a great night."

The First Presbyterian Church of Waynesburg is located in walking distance of campus at 169 W. College St., Waynesburg, Pa.

For more information, contact Dr. Bob Randolph at rrandolp@waynesburg.edu, or by phone at 724-852-3473.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Vira-Heinz-2014.jpgThrough the Vira I. Heinz Program for Women in Global Leadership, Waynesburg University has selected six young women to study abroad this summer. Waynesburg is one of only 15 higher education institutions across Pennsylvania to participate in the Program and was granted six scholarships rather than the traditional three. 

Collectively, the women received more than $37,600 in scholarship money through the Vira I. Heinz Program.

Pat Bristor, associate dean of students and the Waynesburg University coordinator of the Vira I. Heinz Program for almost 20 years, said that the young women represent the best of Waynesburg University. 

“We are pleased to have such bright young women at Waynesburg University who are interested in the world around them,” said Bristor. “To have six women chosen speaks to the quality of our academics, faith integration and service opportunities.”

The Vira I. Heinz Program for Women in Global Leadership prepares women for tomorrow's global challenges by offering a unique opportunity for international experiences, leadership development and community service. Typically, three women from each institution are admitted into the one-year program and receive a scholarship of at least $5,000 to put toward the cost of an international experience of their choosing.

Juniors Ellen Limback, Rebecca Shindelar and Allyson Wernert and sophomores Caley Blankenbuehler, Cassandra Gates and Madison Perretta are the 2014 Waynesburg University recipients of scholarships from the Vira I. Heinz Program for Women in Global Leadership. The scholarships will afford these women the opportunity to travel and study overseas through various study abroad programs.

Limback, an early childhood education (special education) major from Mars, Pa., will study in Cuzco, Peru, through Projects Abroad, one of the world’s leading international volunteer organizations.

While there, she will work in a small village school helping to teach children English. She looks forward to experiencing a different culture, improving her Spanish language skills and developing her teaching experience. 

Shindelar, a junior human services (social science) major from Bemidji, Minn., will travel to Brasov, Romania, also through Projects Abroad. She will volunteer at an orphanage and take two online summer courses. 

“Through my courses in the humanities, I have been equipped with knowledge about the need to interact with and explore the depth of culture and different styles of living in other places around the world,” Shindelar said. 

Allyson Wernert, a junior international studies (international culture) and political science major from Finleyville, Pa., will take her talents to Tokyo, Japan, this summer through Sophia University. She will take classes in Japanese language and culture. Wernert hopes to meet and make friends from all over the world.

Blankenbuehler, a mathematics (secondary education) major from West Newton, Pa., will spend her summer in Southern India through Projects Abroad. There, she will teach English and mathematics to students. 

“At Waynesburg I’ve learned a lot about what it's like to be a Christian and I have developed a relationship with God, so I know that He will be there with me through my whole trip,” Blankenbuehler said. 

Gates, a chemistry (biochemistry) major from Penn Hills, Pa., will travel to Costa Rica through International Studies Abroad (ISA). She will study the Spanish language and environmental studies and participate in volunteer work projects such as species monitoring and trail cleaning.

“I am most looking forward to the experiences and growth that will come with the scholarship,” Gates said. “I have the chance to meet other women who value becoming global leaders. Without the scholarship, I would not have been able to do this.”

Perretta, a sophomore sociology major from Beaver Falls, Pa., will study through IES Abroad’s Summer Psychology Program in Vienna, Austria. She will learn about different methods of communicating with and treating individuals with mental illnesses.

“As a student at Waynesburg University, I've been given incredible opportunities to push myself academically and as a leader on campus,” Perretta said. “This has led me to become prepared to be a leader on campus and, in the future, a leader abroad.”  

Scholarship recipients were required to complete an application, submit academic and personal letters of reference and a proposal for their intended plans. The proposal included a budget for the trip including the cost of airfare, classes, housing and meals, among other items. Applicants were also required to explain how the trip related to their academic areas of study and future plans.

Upon receiving the application and proposals, interviews were held in front of a committee. The students were selected based on their proposal, their leadership on campus, and how well the committee felt they would represent Waynesburg University and the United States abroad. 

The Heinz Endowments supports efforts to make southwestern Pennsylvania a premier place to live and work, a center for learning and educational excellence, and a region that embraces diversity and inclusion. 

The Program has three principal components: the international experience, the Community Engagement Experience and two weekend-long, intensive leadership development retreats. During the spring semester prior to and the fall semester following their international experiences, the awardees meet in Pittsburgh. These trainings provide the awardees with a foundation of skills necessary to maximize cultural learnings while abroad and to engage their leadership skills in their own communities upon their return.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_PRSSA.jpgSeven members of the Waynesburg University Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) Chapter traveled to the PNC Park Hall of Fame Club in Pittsburgh, Pa., Tuesday, Jan. 28, to work the 2014 Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) Pittsburgh Renaissance Awards. The annual ceremony celebrates the brightest stars and best work in Pittsburgh’s public relations community. 

The students arrived before the event began and assisted with set up, schedule review and prep work. During the ceremony, students managed the registration table, communicating with more than 180 public relations practitioners from the Pittsburgh area. Members were also responsible for handing out the awards to the winners. 

“Having the opportunity to help plan and execute the Renaissance Awards with our parent Chapter is invaluable,” said Molly Winters, junior public relations major and the president of Waynesburg University’s PRSSA Chapter. “It shows the professionals we look up to that we are extremely dedicated and are willing to go the extra mile to get that knowledgeable experience.”

This is the second consecutive year the Waynesburg Chapter sent members to work the event after establishing a professional relationship with Dan Ayer, president of PRSA Pittsburgh and co-chair of the 2014 Renaissance Awards, in the fall of 2012. 

“Multiple members of PRSA Pittsburgh have had the opportunity to work with Waynesburg University students in the past,” said Ayer. “When it came time to look for help with our biggest and most high profile event, it was a no-brainer to ask Waynesburg.”

Because of the great impression the students made on Ayer at last year’s event, he contacted Richard Krause, chairman of the Department of Communication and faculty adviser to the Waynesburg University PRSSA, in the fall of 2013 to not only ask if his students could help work the event again, but also for an intern to take control of the call for entries and online entry submission process for the award categories. 

Jordan Mitrik, a sophomore public relations major and historian of Waynesburg University’s PRSSA Chapter, worked alongside Ayer and his team prior to the ceremony. Mitrik managed the entry process, confirmed with the Pittsburgh agencies of their entries as well as categorized them into the appropriate award sections. Once completed, the work done by Mitrik was sent to PRSA Los Angeles to judge the entries and select the winners of the 2014 PRSA Renaissance Awards. 

“The students from Waynesburg University were essential to the success of the Renaissance Awards,” said Ayer. “By knowing that we had such a dedicated and capable group to help, the board was able to focus on making the event even stronger this year.”

Not only did the students work the event, but they also had the opportunity to network with working professionals in the public relations field. Winters said getting the chance to extend the Chapter’s skills and interact with Waynesburg PRSSA’s parent Chapter at the Renaissance Awards was very beneficial. 

“Working with our parent Chapter is extremely important to us, because the work we are doing as students is going to reflect how we act as professionals one day,” said Winters. “We strive to be like our parent Chapter professionals, so working alongside them is very beneficial to us.”

Chartered in 2010, the award-winning Waynesburg University Chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America strives to prepare members for their future profession through experience, opportunity and achievement.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

 

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Only after she had time to finish the interview, drive home, have dinner and relax did Ashley Clark, a junior Waynesburg University marketing major and accounting minor, acknowledge the phrase that had been buzzing around in her head all day. 

“Every day is an interview,” a piece of advice imparted by Clark’s Waynesburg University accounting professor Joshua Chicarelli, resonates in all aspects of her life. Clark believes that each day is a generous gift from God and therefore treats all of her interactions as a means to make a lasting impression. 

That advice served her well that day and throughout the days of her upcoming internship with 84 Lumber Company.

“An education at Waynesburg not only prepares you for your career, it also offers a close-knit experience with professors and advisors, which is crucial for development and preparation in the work world,” she said. “A professor personally recommended that I apply for an internship at 84 Lumber. He saw the position and told me that my skills would fit well there.”

And fit well, they did. Clark impressed 84 Lumber with her “quiet confidence” and strong character, resulting in a summer-long marketing coordinator internship at the company’s corporate headquarters in Eighty Four, Pa. 

“They told me that a lot of applicants all have the same qualities and skill levels, but they were looking for something different,” Clark said. “Confidence can make all the difference.”

Clark said her confidence came from practice and the knowledge that her Waynesburg University education could hold its ground in a fast-paced corporate marketing environment.  

“After interning for a couple of months, my boss told me that I was chosen because I researched the company and could confidently answer questions, as well as ask my own questions at the end of the interview,” she said. “I would not have been so prepared without Waynesburg.” 

At 84 Lumber, Clark created and managed a multi-departmental and 30-store-spanning advertising calendar that allowed her to keep track of the company’s advertising needs, contracts and costs. She proofed and sent ads to local and regional newspapers and sent weekly updates to concerned parties. 

“A lot of money is spent on advertising, and it is important that all the ads are created correctly and are on time,” Clark said. “I was really able to showcase my organization skills and I enjoyed working with various departments, store managers and newspaper representatives.”

She also served as the contact person and organizing manager of the annual 84 Lumber Boy Scout Golf Outing event and helped to plan a customer event for more than 400 people. Throughout the summer, she fulfilled ad requests from many of the chains’ 250 store locations across the United States.

One of Clark’s favorite experiences was volunteering alongside her 84 Lumber coworkers as they partnered with Rebuilding Together and the Pittsburgh Steelers to rebuild a veteran’s home in the area.

“I continue to believe that it is essential to incorporate serving into a business organization because it helps to stay you humble and thankful,” she said. 

In December 2014, Clark will graduate a semester early and begin working in retail marketing and advertising at Lowry's Western Shop in Washington, Pa. She will create and manage the shop’s advertisements throughout the year, bringing with her a wealth of advertising experience from her 84 Lumber internship and from selling advertisements for the campus newspaper, the Waynesburg University Yellow Jacket.  

Her internship became the culminating point for moving forward into a new semester with enthusiasm and energy, and eventually on to a job with that same disposition. 

“All of a sudden, it just clicked that my purpose at Waynesburg University is so much more than just going to class and learning,” she said. “It is making friendships in unfamiliar places, connecting and networking. It is being brave and being myself. It is an interview every day and a chance to make something out of myself. We have that opportunity every day that God lets us wake up in the morning, so why not make the most out of it all?” 

 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Digiandomenico_Kyle_6.JPGFor his passion for service, Waynesburg University awarded Kyle Digiandomenico the prestigious Bonner Scholarship as an incoming freshman. Now three years later, the junior psychology major credits the scholarship for not only allowing him to become a better servant leader, but also for helping to earn him a summer 2013 internship at the world-renowned Cleveland Clinic.  

“I used many techniques I learned in my psychology classes,” Digiandomenico said. “But without experience from many of the sites I serve at through the Bonner Scholar Program, I would not have been equipped to pursue the internship.”

Waynesburg is one of only 23 higher education institutions in the nation to award the Bonner Scholarship, which offers scholarships to approximately 15 incoming scholars each year. The scholarship requires awardees to perform eight to 10 hours of community service each week, as well as two summers dedicated to serving. 

For Digiandomenico, a summer at the Clinic counted toward the Bonner Scholar Program’s summer service requirement, while also fitting within his academic pursuits. According to Evan Kephart, the Interim Coordinator of the Bonner Scholar Program, Digiandomenico embodies what Waynesburg University means by “service learning.” 

“There is a huge difference between service and service learning,” Kephart, a former Waynesburg University Bonner Scholar himself, said. “When a student is able to serve within their selected field of study, they are able to take the knowledge and skills they have learned in the classroom and bring them to bear in solving social or environmental issues. That is what makes Kyle's situation so significant; he was able to use his classroom learning to serve kids at a higher level, which is exactly what the Bonner Program is about.”

Digiandomenico said that working with children and understanding the concepts from his psychology courses prepared him for work as an undergraduate group counselor at the Clinic. He worked with Cleveland Clinic’s Summer Treatment Program for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to help modify behaviors, develop problem solving skills and enable them to take control of their behavior.  

Located in Cleveland, Ohio, Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit, multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. The Summer Treatment Program (STP) is a seven-week behavior modification program that helps children, adolescents and their families learn to manage ADHD. 

“I was assigned two specific children from our group of 10,” Digiandomenico said. “I created individual goals, requirements and plans for them. I was responsible for labeling the negative behaviors, documenting them on a chart and creating goals that we tailored to the specific frequency of negative behaviors.” 

As a part-time basketball coach for the Clinic, he worked to develop positive social interactions between the children in the classroom, a typical setting and an athletic setting. He also hosted daily therapy sessions for the children during which they could discuss anything they wanted. 

“My favorite part was getting to know the children on a deeper level,” Digiandomenico said. “It was a great experience to understand what the children were struggling with at that point in their lives and it was so exciting to work with them one on one to come up with skills to solve those problems.”

Digiandomenico relied on his faith, developed in the heart and nurtured at Waynesburg University, to step outside of his comfort zone and apply for an internship with young people experiencing ADHD. 

“It was very challenging to work with attention deficient children, but I gained a new understanding of patience and problem solving skills,” he said. “I had learned the techniques in class, I had served several populations and I was discovering God’s will for me. Serving at the Clinic was an opportunity for me to tie all three aspects of my life together in real practice.” 

 

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