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As an information technology intern for the summer of 2013, one could reasonably expect Alexander Tenenbaum to sit behind a computer all day, troubleshooting issues and programming for clients. But the junior information technology major, known for his resourcefulness, faithfulness and perseverance, strategically secured an internship that perfectly blended not one, but two of his greatest passions.

Looking for an experience that would advance him both professionally and spiritually, Tenenbaum signed on with the Campus Crusade for Christ ministry in Boston, Mass. There, he completed information technology work and evangelized to college campuses including MIT, University of Massachusetts Boston and Northeastern University.

“Including me, there were eight interns from all across the country. On the Crusade team, we each had a ‘day job’ as well as a special assignment. Mine was spiritual development,” Tenenbaum said. “I helped to prepare and host bible studies for the interns.”

Through the many challenges of living with strangers, away from home and in a new city, Tenenbaum persevered so that he could learn more about his career field and spread God’s word in the process.

“It is so important to be Christ-like to people,” Tenenbaum said. “Visible actions like fixing houses and feeding the homeless are important but temporary. The houses will eventually need fixed again and the homeless will need fed again. Meanwhile, our spiritual interactions with them impacts eternity.” 

Tenenbaum said he felt prepared to host such interactions thanks to his participation in a prayer group at Waynesburg University and through his public speaking experiences and sociology classes. Working at the University’s Help Desk in information technology between classes made him stand out when applying to the internship program.

“My sociology classes have really helped me to understand why people of different religions and cultures believe the things that they do,” Tenenbaum said. “Waynesburg University has taught me to be more confident in my beliefs and to trust the Lord above all else.”

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Deborah-Lewis-resized.jpgDr. Deborah Lewis, director of the RN to BSN Program at Waynesburg University, was selected to present at the 6th Annual Best Practice in Nursing Education Conference March 21, 2014 at UPMC Mercy Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Her abstract, “You want me to do what?  Practice Experience in an RN to BSN program,” outlines the ways in which Waynesburg University’s RN to BSN Program provides practice experience and “allows theory to inform students’ practice and their practice to inform theory with the use of adult learning principles in the classroom.”  

Lewis submitted her abstract to share with other local educators and nurses the process of practice experience in Waynesburg's RN to BSN Program. 

“The students have a required one credit of service learning,” she said. “I think this, along with their other experiences such as the Intro to the New Testament course, gives students the background for looking at their professional and personal life in a different way.”

Sponsored by the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing, UPMC St. Margaret School of Nursing, UPMC Shadyside School of Nursing and Pennsylvania League for Nursing Area VI, the conference aims to bring together nursing educators from across the region to discuss best practices.

Lewis’s presentation will include the learning objectives, method of instruction and content covered in her poster.

Waynesburg University's RN to BSN Program is designed specifically to meet the needs of working RNs who are motivated to meet personal educational goals and want to enhance their career options. The Program is structured in a user-friendly format that allows adult students to balance work and family responsibilities with school-related efforts.

 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Ryan-Devlin-Head-Shot-Resized.jpgRyan Devlin, a 2007 Waynesburg University English education alumnus and Pennsylvania’s 2013 “Teacher of the Year,” received an even greater honor today when he was named one of the four finalists for the 2014 National Teacher of the Year Award. 

Today, the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) announced that educators from Florida, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia are finalists for the 2014 National Teacher of the Year. The National Teacher of the Year spends a year representing educators across the country and advocating on behalf of the teaching profession. 

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett congratulated Devlin on representing the Commonwealth. 

“On behalf of all Pennsylvania citizens, I congratulate Ryan for being chosen to represent Pennsylvania at the national level,” Corbett said.  “Ryan’s commitment to his students is a shining example of the thousands of Pennsylvania educators who are dedicated to ensuring that students are prepared for a bright and successful future.”

This marks the first time that an educator from Pennsylvania has made it to the final four. Devlin will enter rounds of interviews during the month of March and the winner will be announced in April. Still actively involved with his alma mater through mission trips and personal contacts, Devlin credits Waynesburg University as an integral part of his success. 

“The hallmark of a good education is one that enables students’ talents to find purpose, and that is one of the many reasons why Waynesburg University is such a special place,” Devlin said.  “During my time there, I was exposed to numerous educational opportunities that extended beyond the classroom and helped mold me into the man I am today.”

Devlin is an eleventh grade English and ninth through twelfth grade technology teacher at Brockway Area Junior/Senior High School in Brockway, Pa., where he has taught for seven years and serves as head of the English department. 

He also serves as the school's head cross country coach and the senior high gifted education advisor. He is an active member of the Pennsylvania State Education Association, National Education Association and the Brockway Area Education Association.  Outside of school, he frequently speaks at state conferences and college campuses and is a cooperating teacher for Clarion University's student teaching program. 

Devlin also helped write Pennsylvania's new Core Standards English Language Arts curriculum and over the years has won multiple grants for his innovative use of technology in the classroom.  

"Today's children will indeed become tomorrow's leaders, so we must teach ways to find creative solutions to complex problems through collaborating with others and making the best use of technology," Devlin said. 

His teaching methods include extensive use of technology in the classroom, for which he received the Keystone Technology Integrator Award in 2009. Devlin facilitates technology workshops for student teachers at regional universities and teaches summer courses at Riverview Intermediate Unit Six that highlight the newest digital resources available on the Internet.

Current and recently retired faculty members at Waynesburg University are not only proud of Ryan’s awards, but also his continued commitment to the mission of Waynesburg University and the mission of the University’s Department of Education. 

“The mission of the Department of Education is to prepare teachers who embrace learning and dedicate themselves to service and leadership in the profession,” said Debra Clarke, assistant professor of education and chair of the Department of Education at Waynesburg University. “We are so proud of Ryan’s commitment to this mission and his dedication to his students.”

 

Devlin received his bachelor’s degree in secondary English education from Waynesburg University, where he became familiar with technology in the classroom and gained hands-on experience with modern instructional technology. Devlin also holds a master’s degree in educational leadership. He also holds teaching certificates in English (grades 7-12), business/computers (grades K-12) and library science (grades K-12). 

In 2013, Devlin became the youngest nominee and recipient of the Pennsylvania Teacher of the Year award. Devlin said he has known since the age of eight what he wanted to do with the rest of his life.

“I spent a lot my childhood and adolescent years daydreaming about the type of teacher I wanted to become,” he said.  “Teaching seemed like the perfect outlet for my creativity, and I wanted to do something that would enable me to make a difference in the world.”

An active member in his local community, Devlin is a mentor with the Big Brothers, Big Sisters program, teaches vacation Bible school and is involved in several after-school programs and activities.

The National Teacher of the Year (NTOY) Program began in 1952 and continues as the oldest, most prestigious national honors program that focuses public attention on excellence in teaching.

 

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_McEntyre.jpgWaynesburg University’s b.f. maiz Lecture will be held Wednesday, Jan. 22, at 7 p.m. in Alumni Hall and will feature Marilyn Chandler McEntyre. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend.

Marilyn Chandler McEntyre is a poet and strong advocate of the well-being of language. She has a profound interest in the relationship between words and painting and is a spokesperson for the idea of medicine and poetry.

McEntyre teaches at the University of California Berkeley and the University of California at San Francisco Joint Medical Program. She has won numerous teaching awards, including an Outstanding Teaching Award from Princeton University, a Phi Beta Kappa of Northern California Outstanding Teaching Award and a Whiting Fellowship.

She has published numerous chapters in books and is contributing editor of Literature and Medicine from Johns Hopkins University. She holds a doctorate in comparative literature from Princeton University, a Master of Arts degree in English from the University of California, Davis, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in French from Pamona College.

The b. f. maiz Center, named after the late poet b. f. maiz, exists to continue and to amplify his lifelong concerns with poetry, peace and poetic justice. This speaker is invited to campus as part of the b.f. maiz Center’s activities.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Kathy-Stolfer-Resized.jpgDr. Kathy Stolfer, associate professor of nursing at Waynesburg University, recently presented at the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Baccalaureate Nursing Education Conference in New Orleans, La.

Her presentation, “RN-BSN Courses: The Clinical Piece,” focused on the creation of required clinical components for RN-BSN courses according to what AACN mandates.

“I was very honored to be accepted, based on the fact that 339 abstract submissions were received and only 35 percent were accepted, which included podium and poster presentations,” Stolfer said. “My podium presentation was well-received, and I had a packed room!”

The annual conference presented issues of vital importance to baccalaureate and pre-licensure nursing education. AACN works to establish quality standards for nursing education; assist deans and directors to implement those standards; influence the nursing profession to improve health care; and promote public support for professional nursing education, research and practice.

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Contact: Ashley Wise, Communication Specialist

724.852.7675or awise@waynesburg.edu

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