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The Waynesburg University Baccalaureate Nursing Program was recently notified of its 100 percent pass rate on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). The University's program was one of three baccalaureate programs out of 37 in the state of Pennsylvania to achieve the 100 percent pass rate this year. This year’s feat marks the program’s sixth year of achieving the 100 percent pass rate.

This year, 155,585 candidates tested in the United States and achieved an average national pass rate of 81.74 percent. Pennsylvania had the sixth largest number of candidates, with 7,164 testing from 84 programs with an average pass rate of 82.82 percent. Forty-three Waynesburg University students collectively achieved the 100 percent pass rate on the first attempt.  

The exam pass rate takes into account graduates who tested Oct. 1, 2013, through Sept. 30, 2014. Students take the NCLEX subsequent to graduation from a baccalaureate, diploma or associate degree program. A student must pass the exam in order to become licensed to practice as a registered nurse.

“The 100 percent pass rate is an indicator of program quality and the cutting edge curriculum,” said Dr. Nancy Mosser, professor of nursing and chair and director of the Department of Nursing at Waynesburg University. “The faculty works to offer a consistently rigorous, standard-driven program. Students understand that professional values provide the foundation for quality nursing care.”

Mosser said that the program plans to maintain the high pass rates by continuing to offer a rigorous curriculum that challenges students to use evidence-based knowledge as the basis for practice.

“The dedication of our students is reflected in the pass rate and their success in being hired following graduation,” she said. “The students work hard over the course of the four years they are enrolled in the program, and we are very proud of them.”

The program offers clinical experiences starting the first semester of the sophomore year, a state-of-the-art simulation lab and experienced faculty members. The baccalaureate program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036, 202-887-6791). The department offers accredited MSN and DNP degree programs as well.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Tinnemeyer-and-students-Chapel-steps.jpgWith so many colleges and universities out there to choose from, it can be difficult to decide where all to apply. After filling out a few, you may look at the next school on your list and think to yourself, “Why should I apply here?” Well, if you’re asking that about Waynesburg University, this list is your answer! Here are the top five reasons to apply to Waynesburg:

 

5. It’s free!  Not much to explain here. If you apply online, it won’t cost you a penny!

4. Fun.  We understand you need some downtime in order to be successful academically. Whether you’re off to practice, enjoying Bingo night, taking a trip to Pittsburgh or just hanging with friends in the residence halls, you’ll never be at a loss for things to do. Oh, and traditions that students enjoy? We’ve got a bunch of those, too. Pumpkin Bowling, the Campus Community Thanksgiving Dinner, and the President’s Breakfast are but a few.

3. Achievement Awards.  Depending on where you’re at with your cumulative high school GPA and SAT/ACT scores, you could be in line for anywhere from $28,000 to $60,000 (four-year totals) in Achievement Awards. If you apply and are accepted, you’ll find out right on your acceptance letter how much, if any, you may qualify for. This, along with other Financial Aid, could help defray the total cost of attending Waynesburg, which is already almost $11,000 less than other private, four-year institutions!

2. Hands-on learning.  Hands-on learning is a staple here, and in almost every major, that starts freshman year. Whether you’re assessing injuries on the football field, analyzing blood spatter in the Forensic Science Lab or broadcasting events from the University’s remote TV truck, you won’t just be sitting in a classroom. When you are, though, it’ll only be with about 19 others. As a result, your professors will know you and invest themselves in your learning.

1. People.  Cliché? Maybe. But to so many here, the best part of Waynesburg truly is its people. Those faculty members we just mentioned, President Lee, Residence Life, Campus Ministry Assistants, coaches, and the list could go on – all here committed to our mission of Christian faith, scholarship and service, and to your holistic development as a person.

 

As you can see, no matter what your criteria, Waynesburg has something for you. Don’t wait; apply today! (Remember, it’s free!)

 

Plus, if you apply and are accepted within the next few weeks, you may also be eligible to apply for some of our Competitive Merit Scholarship Programs. You don’t want to miss out on that opportunity!

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IMG_0676.jpgOn Tuesday, Nov. 18, the Fort Jackson Chapter of the Pennsylvania Society Sons of the American Revolution (PASSAR) recognized Waynesburg University for its service to the community through its annual Merit Badge University (MBU). MBU provides Boy Scouts with the opportunity to earn merit badges while being exposed to a wide spectrum of academic disciplines by qualified faculty and staff at Waynesburg University.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_HEALTH_UD_078.jpgWaynesburg University’s Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program hosted a panel discussion and debate at the University’s Monroeville center Sunday, Nov. 16. 

In an effort to promote interprofessional opportunities, the DNP Program invited six first-year medical students from the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine to participate in the debate about healthcare utilization. 

“Most professions are seeking opportunities for interprofessional development,” said Dr. Kimberly Whiteman, assistant professor and co-director of the Graduate and Professional Studies Nursing Program and DNP Program at Waynesburg University. “We don’t have a medical school and they don’t have a nursing school; this program enabled both of us to have a collaborative experience.” 

Waynesburg’s DNP Program established this event in conjunction with the Institute of Medicine’s initiative to promote “interprofessional education for collaboration.” 

“It was well received on both ends,” said Dr. Kimberly Stephens, assistant professor of nursing at Waynesburg and co-director of the DNP Program. “Both our students and theirs thought it was beneficial, and it encouraged us to continue to look for opportunities that are valuable.”

Amber Egyud, full-time chief nursing officer for Allegheny Health Network and a second-year DNP student at Waynesburg University, participated in the debate. 

“The debate helped to develop networks that foster the exchange, synthesis and application of innovation to improve healthcare outcomes,” she said. “The benefit of interprofessional collaboration is the ability to share professional competence and experience to improve healthcare outcomes.” 

Waynesburg University's 36-credit Doctor of Nursing Practice program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, D.C., 20036, 202-887-6791. It is offered at the Monroeville Center. Each course meets one weekend every other month in the 15-week semester, with learning activities and assignments to be completed between seminars. 

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_stover-2.jpgWaynesburg University Stover Scholars visited leaders at the Pentagon, Supreme Court, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and The Washington Post Monday, Nov. 10.

The twenty Stover Scholars first met Senior Civilian Assistant to the Secretary of the Air Force Eric Pierce at the Pentagon. Following an intriguing tour of the building and September 11 monuments, Pierce shared his insights on defense, military strategy and leadership along with his journey on the D.C. political path. Matt Kenney, a junior computer science major from Northumberland, Pa., commented, “Eric Pierce gave an upfront and honest perspective about the current state of defense.”

The group then visited the Supreme Court of the United States and sat in on the 11:00 a.m. oral arguments. “Seeing the oral arguments at the Supreme Court was amazing. It is one thing to read the justices’ opinions in a textbook, but to watch the justices engage in questioning based on their judicial philosophies made the court come alive,” remarked Gina Robinson, a senior English major from Lower Burrell, Pa. 

The Scholars then met Judge Janice Rogers Brown at the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Judge Brown laid out her constitutional, political and moral insights for the students through her own experiences as a judge in Washington, D.C., and as a justice on the Supreme Court for the state of California. She inspired and encouraged the Scholars to learn from their failures by failing better the next time. 

At The Washington Post, the Stover Scholars met with reporter Chris Cillizza who described the evolution and impact of his daily online column and blog, The Fix.  Nika Anschuetz, a junior communication major from Zelienople, Pa., said, “As an aspiring journalist, meeting with Chris Cillizza was both beneficial and inspiring. His views about journalism and politics were refreshing.”

The Stover Scholars ended their D.C. trip by meeting Stifel, Nicolaus and Incorporated investment banker Jim Rowan. Rowan, although living on the edge of Washington, D.C., for many years, provided a detailed discussion of an outsider’s view of the political scene within the city. He described the challenges facing businesses from government regulation.

Commenting on the D.C. trip, sophomore pre-law major Paige Carter from Coraopolis, Pa., said, “The dynamics that we experienced today amazed me. This trip fostered in-depth conversation and deep informed thought regarding foreign, domestic and legal policy.” Freshman entrepreneurship major Kiana Levi from Venetia, Pa., commented, "This trip opened my eyes, challenged my political thought and strengthened my confidence to express my opinion.”

b2ap3_thumbnail_stover-3.jpgStover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership Director Dr. Lawrence Stratton said, "The in-depth interactions between Stover Scholars and prominent leaders in law, military policy, journalism and business, and with each other, was commendable.”

The Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership is a unique Waynesburg University program dedicated to transforming the political sphere in the context of Christian Ethics and American constitutionalism.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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