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b2ap3_thumbnail_9-15-Pestritto.jpgWaynesburg University’s Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership and Honors Academy will host a lecture presented by Hillsdale College professor Dr. Ronald J. Pestritto Thursday, September 24, 2015, 7:30 p.m. in Alumni Hall.  Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend.

Dr. Pestritto’s lecture is titled “Rule by Law or by Executive Fiat? How Agencies Govern Without Consent.” 

Dr. Pestritto is the graduate dean and an associate professor of politics at Hillsdale College, where he teaches political philosophy, American political thought and American politics, and holds the Charles and Lucia Shipley Chair in the American Constitution. He is a senior fellow of the College’s Kirby Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship, a senior fellow of the Claremont Institute for the Study of Statesmanship and Political Philosophy and an academic fellow of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Dr. Pestritto earned his Bachelor of Arts from Claremont McKenna College and his Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in government from the Claremont Graduate University. He is the author of “Woodrow Wilson and the Roots of Modern Liberalism,” the editor of “Woodrow Wilson: The Essential Political Writings” and the co-editor of “American Progressivism: A Reader.” 

“Professor Pestritto will show the bipartisan historical precedence which bolstered the administrative state and upset the original constitutional design,” said Dr. Lawrence M. Stratton, director of the Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or

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b2ap3_thumbnail_9-15-Kimmie.jpgThe Yellow Jacket: an award-winning student newspaper since 1924, and the place where communication students come to prosper.

As a freshman journalism student at Waynesburg, I knew I’d get involved with the Yellow Jacket. But for that first semester, I was extremely hesitant to devote myself to it. I’m just a freshman – how valuable can I really be? What if my work isn’t good enough? What if I don’t find my niche? How will I get my other work done? How will I have time to sleep?

Two years later, as a junior, I’m the Executive Editor for the Yellow Jacket. Some of these questions still eat at me – I don’t pretend to have all the answers. Regardless, I know this is where I’m meant to be. A lot of my work for the newspaper is behind the scenes, but I’m making my mark. And at the same time, the Yellow Jacket is making its mark on me. Here are three of the most important lessons I’m learning as Executive Editor, each of which has given me insight into my field, myself and my future.

  1. There CAN be enough time. The Yellow Jacket is issued weekly. I spend every Monday and Tuesday night with my staff, working far past midnight to create all 16 pages of the newspaper. Then, we spend the day on Wednesday (in between classes) with our advisor, finalizing everything and sending it off to print. I use Thursday and Friday to interview sources and write articles for the paper, and then I spend the weekend attending to all of my other schoolwork and seeing family and friends. Come Monday, I begin again, with classes and a job added into the mix. It used to seem impossible – and terrifying. Now, it’s doable. So far, I’ve found time for everything – though it sometimes means I sacrifice a full night’s sleep. The point is, effective time management is a reachable goal and an essential skill for college and beyond. The Yellow Jacket has shown me my strengths and my limits, and together, we’ve struck a balance.
  2. Flying solo isn’t an option.  When I was named as the next Executive Editor, the most popular piece of advice I got was, “You need someone on your side.” I’m lucky enough to have a whole support team, without whom I’d be floundering. I have a staff at the Yellow Jacket who works with me every day to help make the newspaper a success and my life easier. I have two best friends who listen to all of my dilemmas, support all of my endeavors and drag me away from my work to relax with them at least once a week. I have an advisor who takes a genuine interest in my life, future and well-being, in addition to guiding my every Yellow Jacket step. I’m an independent person, but the Yellow Jacket has taught me that the best results arrive when you rely on others. 
  3. The real world is coming - get ready.  The real world doesn’t allow sleeping in until 10 on weekdays. The real world brings constant pressure from superiors to perform well. The real world means being professional, becoming a leader and establishing who you are. More than any experience I’ve had, the Yellow Jacket is getting me ready for that world. I can’t complain about getting up early – I know it’ll only get earlier when I graduate. I can’t crack under the pressure of responsibility – I have to learn to be at my best when there are people counting on me. I can’t be afraid to come into my own and be a leader – that’s what will lead to success in the future. I’m in training every day for how to interact professionally with my peers and my superiors, and I know I’ll be thanking the Yellow Jacket when I leave school and those skills really count. 

From being a scared, shy, intimidated freshman to becoming Executive Editor, the Yellow Jacket is, more than anything else, responsible for showing me the way. I don’t know where I’m headed after May 2017, but I know this: the Yellow Jacket has changed me – for good.


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The Waynesburg University Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science and the Office of Admissions will host a fall Mock Crime Scene Workshop Saturday, Nov. 14, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

The Mock Crime Scene Workshop provides high school students the opportunity to analyze crime scenes and collect and process evidence alongside Waynesburg University students and faculty, as well as experts in the field. 

Students will gain hands-on training from skilled experts in the forensic sciences and have the opportunity to utilize those practices by applying them at a crime scene. The vast array of sessions offered will help students to determine if they can see a forensic science or criminal justice career in their futures. 

“The Mock Crime Scene weekend gives the current students, faculty and staff the opportunity to meet prospective students and show them, through experience, what they can expect by attending Waynesburg University,” said Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science. “Our goal is to excite them about our programs, the opportunities available to them and assist them with making lasting connections with our community.” 

Every year, typically more than 40 current high school juniors and seniors attend the event. 

To register or for more information, contact the Office of Admissions at 800-225-7393. 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_BPTW-LOGO-GOOD-with-button.jpgWaynesburg University has been selected as a finalist for the 2015 Best Places to Work Awards by the Pittsburgh Business Times, based on the results of an employee engagement survey completed by employees in June. 

“We are proud to be recognized by the Pittsburgh Business Times as a 'Best Places to Work' finalist,” said Waynesburg University President Douglas G. Lee. “It’s a privilege to serve alongside the dedicated faculty and staff at the University. This recognition is a result of the enthusiasm and commitment each one brings forth.”

Waynesburg University is one of ten finalists in the “150+ Employees” category. To be eligible for selection as a finalist, companies must reach a minimum level of employee participation, based on total number of employees. Responses from completed surveys are compiled and evaluated. 

Companies are ranked and finalists are chosen in each size category according to their overall engagement score. Finalists are chosen based on the results of the survey and, in essence, by the employees themselves. 

Finalists will be honored and winners will be announced at a luncheon Friday, Oct. 30. 

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations
724.852.7675 or

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b2ap3_thumbnail_possible-photo-for-small-liberal-arts-blog-2_20150910-135855_1.jpgBig school, or small school? That’s the question a lot of individuals face when choosing a college. And in the long list of factors that goes into choosing a college, size and type often find themselves placed near the top in terms of importance. To help with this critical question in the college search process, here are the top five reasons to consider a small, liberal arts college or university…

5. Community.  It’s rare to walk anywhere on a smaller campus and not see someone you know. Sheer numbers play a major role in that, but so does the fact that everyone on campus seems to be involved in something. If you play a sport, host a show on the school radio station, perform in the musical and work in the bookstore, you might be a student at one of these schools. Seems like a busy life, but the camaraderie is hard to beat at larger institutions.
4. Scholarships and financial aid.  Sure, big, public universities may have a cheaper sticker price, but when it comes to the bottom line, small schools often surprise prospective students with their affordability. The combination of scholarships and need-based institutional aid, which typically isn’t available at larger colleges, makes this possible.
3. Small classes taught by professors.  Because graduate and doctoral programs are not as prevalent at smaller liberal arts schools, often times, teaching assistants don’t exist, and if they do, they’re not in front of the classroom. Faculty members are the ones teaching the undergraduate students, and it’s almost always in a smaller setting. No 300-seat auditoriums here; you’ll know your classmates and be able to interact with them in a more intimate classroom environment.
2. Grad schools and employers value it.  As Lynn O’Shaughnessy put it in her 2010 article on, “liberal arts colleges…teach kids how to think, talk and write,” and while simple, that’s exactly what employers are looking for. Furthermore, according to O’Shaughnessy’s article, “liberal arts schools dominate the list of the top 10 institutions that produce the most students who ultimately earn doctorates.” Why is this? Graduate and professional schools are looking for the right mix of academic ability, research experience and leadership roles outside of the classroom—exactly what students can prove and acquire at smaller liberal arts colleges
1. You know your professors, and they know you.  While learning from professors in small classes is great, an even bigger benefit is getting to know your professors on a personal level and gaining hands-on experience right alongside them. The connections you make with those individuals become invaluable as you search for graduate schools and/or employment. They’ve all been out there in the field doing the work themselves, and now they’re helping little ol' you do the same.

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