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b2ap3_thumbnail_8-22-Freshman-service_20160822-194726_1.jpgWaynesburg University’s incoming freshman class participated in several service projects in Greene County Saturday, Aug. 20. Noble Energy sponsored the event.

Service projects included the development of a five-mile trail at the Greene County Airport; the restoration of a five-mile nature trail that loops through the woods behind the Greene County Historical Society; the cleaning and reorganizing of the Historical Society’s Collick Schoolhouse; and the relocating of artifacts into the Civil War Cabin.

The approximately 500 volunteers also assisted the Corner Cupboard Food Bank with preparing boxes for pantry distribution and helped build a community garden consisting of five raised beds which will provide fresh produce to individuals in need.

State Rep. Pam Snyder, D-Jefferson, addressed the volunteers following the service projects. 

“I look at you, and you are the future,” she said. “We need leaders like you. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for what you did for Greene County today. God bless you.” 

This service initiative, during which the freshman class served alongside faculty, staff, Bonner scholars and upperclassmen, was a part of New Student Orientation Weekend. 

“I love that Waynesburg does a lot of service because I love to volunteer; I really enjoy making someone’s day and helping others,” said Jenna Bartley, a freshman computer science major from Irwin, Pennsylvania. “We are so blessed to be able to make a difference in this community and meet a lot of great people while doing it.”

Noble Energy, Inc. is a global independent oil and natural gas exploration and production company. For more information, please visit www.nobleenergyinc.com.  

Stacey Brodak, Senior Advisor Government, Community and Media Relations, said, “Noble Energy’s purpose is ‘Energizing the World, Bettering People’s Lives,’ and we take that very seriously. We strive to find projects and partnerships that provide long-term sustainable benefits for the areas where we operate. All of the projects involved in this partnership with Waynesburg University were impactful, and the community garden, pumpkin patch and orchard project are outstanding models for all communities. Waynesburg University and each of the agencies we worked with were very appreciative and most gracious. It personally made me very proud to give back to my home county.”

 

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Waynesburg University will begin classes this week with seven new faculty members who have joined the undergraduate and graduate teaching communities.

“We are pleased to welcome these new faculty members to the Waynesburg University campus community,” said Waynesburg University Provost Dr. Dana Cook Baer. “Each one of them brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the classroom that will further enhance the positive learning experience of our students."

Dr. David Corbett will serve as an assistant professor of business administration. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from California University of Pennsylvania and his Ph.D. from Argosy University.

Jayne Olshanksi has been named an assistant professor of accounting. She received her B.S. degree and M.B.A. degree from Pennsylvania State University and is a certified public accountant in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Jody Rawlings has joined the University as an instructor of nursing. She received her B.A. and B.S. degrees from Waynesburg University and her M.S. degree from Excelsor College.

Dr. Fawn Robinson has been named an assistant professor of counseling. She received her B.S.B.A. degree from Clarion University, her M.A. degree from Slippery Rock University and her Ph.D. from Duquesne University.

Joseph Shaffer will serve as an assistant professor of athletic training, the director of the Athletic Training Program and an assistant athletic trainer for the University. He received his B.S. degree from Lock Haven University and his M.S. degree from West Virginia University. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. degree from Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions.

William Stough has joined the University as an instructor of business administration. He received his B.S. and M.B.A. degrees from Waynesburg University and is a certified public accountant in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Joshua Sumpter will serve as an instructor of biblical and ministry studies and assistant chaplain for the University. He received his B.A. degree from Ashland University, his M.A. degree from Waynesburg University and a M.Div. degree from Ashland Theological Seminary.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Posted by on in Alumni

b2ap3_thumbnail_Zachary-DiBeradin.jpgWhen Zachary DiBeradin graduated from Waynesburg University in 2015, the interactive design major pictured himself putting his skills to work for a design firm or a photography studio, even a marketing firm. However, after landing a job in a completely different niche within his field, he is happily employed at Dick’s Sporting Goods in a way unlike he ever imagined.

DiBeradin is a learning media designer for Dick’s, where he works with a team of instructional designers, subject matter experts, vendors and management teams to provide learning solutions for the company. Many of their projects include electronic components, such as video series, where others are simply in-person trainings.

“My main role is to support the instructional designers with research and provide a solution to the need or demand,” said DiBeradin. “I primarily work on creating media that looks good and is also functional for the end user.”

Additionally, DiBeradin is a freelance designer and photographer in the Pittsburgh region.

He credits his Waynesburg University education and professors for all of his current professional opportunities.

“I am extremely grateful for the amount of exposure and portfolio building opportunities I received during my time at Waynesburg,” said DiBeradin. “I would like to thank all of my professors that have prepared me by giving me relevant knowledge from people who have first-hand experience in the industry.”

DiBeradin was most influenced by Dr. Chad Sherman, assistant professor of communication, Kristine Schiffbauer, instructor of communication, and Richard Krause, assistant professor of communication and chair of the Department of Communication.

“They gave me opportunities that I wouldn’t have been able to find anywhere else,” he said. “They taught me how to further my knowledge by pushing myself to be better at everything I do; to challenge myself and to always be open to new things.”

Since entering the workforce, DiBeradin has learned that his work can make a difference in the lives of others. He takes pride in the fact that his work can directly help people, as well as an entire company, develop.

“I’m always happy that I can make a difference in the way someone learns,” said DiBeradin. “It is always rewarding to be able to challenge people and make them think about different situations through media.”

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Posted by on in Internships

b2ap3_thumbnail_Melanie-Kauffman.jpgMelanie Kauffman might have only spent one year so far at Waynesburg University, but the junior forensic science transfer student has wasted no time benefiting from her Waynesburg professors, education and experiences.

“Since I have only had two semesters at Waynesburg, I’ve only taken a handful of classes, however, in various ways, all of the classes I have taken are applicable to my work and have prepared me for this laboratory experience,” said Kauffman.

The laboratory experience she speaks of has been a three month internship as an inclusion analyst in the quality control laboratory of North American Hoganas in Hollsopple, Pennsylvania, also known as the Stony Creek plant.

Hoganas is an international company known for making a wide variety of products, such as metal powders, alloys for surface protection of exposed surfaces, brazing filler metals and pastes, as well as inductors and electric drive systems. North American Hoganas is one of three branches in North America and specializes mostly in the mass production of powdered metals.

Kauffman learned of the internship opportunity through her father, who works in the Maintenance Department at North American Hoganas.

“One night at school, I called home to talk with my parents and I had mentioned to them that I was looking for a summer internship,” said Kauffman. “And it turned out that very day my dad had a meeting where they explained to employees that they were accepting internship applications for the Stony Creek plant.”

Upon submitting her application materials, Kauffman was invited to tour the plant where she completed standard paperwork, discussed the specifics of her potential job and took a critical thinking test. This visit was in lieu of a traditional interview, which is standard for most internship applicants.

“They merely took me on the basis of my resume,” said Kauffman.

Kauffman was able to build her academic resume and expand her general wealth of knowledge by enrolling in Dr. Chad Keyes’ organic chemistry class last year. A class, she said, that prepared her the most for her internship.

“Through his energetic lectures, I was able to learn a vast array of chemical reactions, molecular structures and how various microscopes can aid in meticulous analyzation,” said Kauffman.

Kauffman’s internship has been equally rewarding and challenging. Her favorite part, though, is having the opportunity to eat lunch with her dad every day and having a small glimpse into his role at the plant.

Additionally, she has become part of the lab’s family and learned various methodologies for her work.

“I have constantly improved my meticulous analyzation of the inclusions and preparation processes,” said Kauffman. “This is something that I think will be very beneficial in my future.”

Oddly enough, these same benefits have also been the most challenging for her, in addition to learning the wide range of testing and machinery in the lab.

All in all, Kauffman’s experience at North American Hoganas will no doubt propel her into her final years of study at Waynesburg and beyond.

“By obtaining this laboratory experience and making these connections with the wonderful people at North American Hoganas, I have taken a step forward to polishing my resume, gaining hands-on experience and acquiring skills that can only be obtained on a day-to-day basis that will further aid me in my future endeavors,” said Kauffman.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_7-11-ACS-Regional-Mtg-JK.jpgIn a few short weeks, Jelena Kyle, recent forensic science alumna, will be continuing her education across the Atlantic Ocean. Kyle will be pursuing a master’s degree in forensic science at Northumbria University in the United Kingdom.

Kyle first learned of Northumbria through Dr. Evonne Balduaff, associate professor of chemistry and chair of the Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science, who, at the time, was exploring a future study abroad program with the school.

“We would always joke that I was going to go there for graduate school, but I don’t think either of us thought that one day I actually would,” said Kyle.

Baldauff and Michael Cipoletti, assistant professor of forensic science, once visited Northumbria and upon their return, shared how amazing it was as a school. This was when Kyle made a decision that Northumbria was where she wanted to continue her education.

Kyle’s professors at Waynesburg have helped shape her into the person she has become today. In addition to Baldauff and Cipoletti, Kelly Wilczynski, chemical hygiene officer and safety coordinator, and Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science, have become personal and academic influencers to Kyle.

In addition to being her professor, Baldauff was her research advisor and saw firsthand the amount of time and dedication that Kyle devoted to her studies in the chemistry lab.

“I am surprised that she didn’t get sick of me for how much time I spent up there on the fifth floor of Stewart Hall,” said Kyle. “The joke was that I was either going to become the mascot or that I should just bring my mattress and move in.”

Musko was Kyle’s biggest cheerleader and the one who pushed her harder every day to do her best. Another friend and Kyle coined the phrase, “Musko Wednesdays,” which became a time when they held conversations with Musko in her office about anything from school to politics to TV.

“It might not seem like much, but it was honestly one of the biggest stress relievers for me,” said Kyle.

Kyle credits the structure of Waynesburg’s forensic science curriculum for helping her with choosing a career. At Waynesburg, students experience all disciplines in the forensic science field rather than being forced to choose a specific discipline from the start.

“Not many colleges other than Waynesburg offer this,” said Kyle. “I was able to study a little bit of every division so I would be better suited to then pick what it was I wanted to do as a career.”

Indeed, that is how Kyle decided that she wanted to become a latent fingerprint examiner and work for the counterfeiting division of the Secret Service.

In September, Kyle will begin her coursework at Northumbria, and she is very eager to do so.

“I think I am most excited about going to a different country for my degree,” said Kyle. “I am going to learn so much over there, not just from my new professors, but from the culture and area.”

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