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Waynesburg University will host summer Visitation Days for transfer students, high school students and their families Friday, June 26, and Friday, July 17.

“It is an important step for prospective candidates for admission and their families to visit on these summer visitation days to learn about our mission and commitment to academic excellence and outcomes,” said Jessica Sumpter, director of admissions at Waynesburg University. “Through these events, visiting families will discover the value of the Waynesburg University experience.”

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. in Roberts Chapel both days. After check-in, students will have the opportunity to meet with faculty and staff in their elected majors, learn about admissions and financial aid, take a tour of the campus and enjoy lunch in the Benedum Dining Hall.

The purpose of Visitation Days is to provide prospective students and their families with the opportunity to experience Waynesburg University. For many students, this is their first visit to campus, so it is important that they get a chance to tour it, meet with professors and learn more about the admissions and financial aid processes. 

Approximately 1,400 students are currently enrolled in Waynesburg University’s undergraduate programs. More than 70 academic concentrations are offered at the University, which maintains its status as one of the least expensive private institutions in Pennsylvania.

For more information or to register for a summer Visitation Day, call 1-800-225-7393.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Waynesburg University’s Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) will offer Level I Summer Institute, a free professional development opportunity featuring methods and materials from the Library of Congress. 

Level I Summer Institute will take place Monday, June 29, to Wednesday, July 1, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Waynesburg University’s main campus. Participants will earn up to 15 PDE Act 48 Activity Hours.

All educators are invited to explore online resources by expanding their understanding of the Library of Congress and discovering effective strategies for teaching with primary sources. 

The program will include an overview of the Library of Congress TPS Program, a tutorial of how to select and use the free digitized collections of primary sources from www.loc.gov and instruction of aligning existing classroom activities with Common Core Standards. 

Interactive strategies and methods, ready-to-use classroom activities and project development and collaboration will also be offered. 

Lunch is included. To register, visit: https://forms.waynesburg.edu/machfoh orm/view.php?id=365230

For more information, contact Sue Wise, associate director of the TPS Program at Waynesburg University, at swise@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3377.

Funded by a grant from the Library of Congress, TPS at Waynesburg University provides professional development for in-service and pre-service teachers. TPS at Waynesburg University works with schools, universities, libraries and foundations to help teachers throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania use the Library's digitized primary sources to enrich their classroom instruction.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Tagged in: TPS TPS news
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Today we visited the indigenous village of Ngöbe and the people there. To get there, we took a two-hour truck ride up the mountain. We got to tour an organic coffee farm run by the local people. Sustainability is beginning to trend in businesses all throughout Panama, even in the remotest of villages. 

The members of this village live a simple life, but it is far from boring. The women wear a beautifully colored traditional dress called the Ngwä. For lunch, we ate a traditional meal of a salad with a homemade dressing, rice and plantains. It was delicious. While we ate, there were several children playing and chattering in the local language nearby. 

We asked to play soccer with them, but they were extremely shy. It seemed they don’t receive many visitors from outside the village, and didn’t know how to respond. All the same, the people were very welcoming and smiled patiently when we spoke our broken Spanish. I loved learning about and seeing their culture. It is uninterrupted by technology and the outside world, but full of life and meaning. 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_5-21-Narasimhan-2_20150522-144111_1.jpgThis internship keeps getting cooler. Today, we had a troop of wild howlers hanging around the sanctuary, and our babies actually got into the trees and interacted with them! We call this troop R2D2, and all of their names have something to do with Star Wars. The dominant male’s name is Yoda, and the other male is Vader. 

It’s interesting because no matter where a howler troop is, you will almost always find the dominant male in the center of the group. Stevie, our blind howler, was playing with Mace, a baby in the troop. It was adorable. Rugby is still a little shy with other howlers, but she is getting there. Watching the wild howlers and capuchins is unlike anything I have ever seen. It’s one thing to see them in photographs and to learn about their behavior in a textbook, but nothing compares to seeing it in person. I really enjoy just sitting peacefully and watching. 

Another cool thing we are doing is documenting howler behavior. The species has been neglected in this area, and so the research we are doing is extremely important. Every day we do several behavioral follows, either focusing on one baby or both. For about forty-five minutes, we document their every behavior, which can be anything from a vocalization to foraging. This is called an ethogram, and it takes a while to get the hang of. We are also identifying all of the individuals in each troop to try to get a population count. As of right now, it is not known how many howlers live in Panama, further adding to the importance of our research.

My favorite part of the internship so far has been interacting with the monkeys. The babies are frustrating at times, and it sometimes feels like babysitting spoiled toddlers. We try to keep them in the trees and off the ground as much as possible, to mimic a normal upbringing and get them used to a typical howler lifestyle (wild howlers spend almost no time on the ground). Sometimes, however, the babies do not want to get into a tree and just want to cuddle. Sometimes they will bite and run away, resulting in a wild monkey chase. However, watching them in the trees and playing with them is so rewarding, and they have the ability to make anyone’s heart melt, no matter how hard they bite.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Jenny-Schouppe.jpgJennifer Schouppe, a junior communication major with a focus in journalism and electronic media from Beaver, Pa., was recently named the winner of the 2015 Teresa Spatara Memorial Scholarship. 

The Pennsylvania Women’s Press Association (PWPA) offers the Teresa Spatara Memorial Scholarship to current junior, senior and graduate students pursuing a career in print journalism. The scholarship is named in honor of Teresa Spatara, a career journalist with The Herald in Sharon, Pa., who passed away in 2013. 

“I’m very honored to receive this scholarship,” said Schouppe. “I’m thankful for my professors who bring their real-world experiences from the field into the classroom. Their teachings and advice definitely had a part in helping me to achieve this accomplishment.” 

Schouppe, Waynesburg University’s first recipient of the scholarship, met all of the scholarship requirements including proven journalistic ability, dedication to a newspaper career and general merit. 

Schouppe recently received the position as the chief photographer for Waynesburg University’s award-winning student news publication, the Yellow Jacket. She is the programming director for Waynesburg University’s Society of Professional Journalists student chapter and an intern at McMillen Photography. 

“Winning the PWPA scholarship is a wonderful recognition of Jenny’s hard work both in her journalism classes and with the student newspaper,” said Brandon Szuminsky, instructor of communication and co-advisor for the Yellow Jacket. “As she heads into her senior year, we feel strongly that Jenny is going to be an integral part of the Yellow Jacket next year, and it’s good to see the PWPA shares our high opinion of her.”

Schouppe’s scholarship will wrap up an award-filled semester for Waynesburg University’s journalism program.

“Jenny’s scholarship is a wonderful capper to a great semester for the journalism program at Waynesburg University that saw the newspaper staff win six state and regional awards,” said Szuminsky. “It’s a great confirmation that a student can have both the myriad of benefits of a small-school education and still have great opportunities to grow as young journalists.” 

Schouppe was awarded $1,500. She will attend the PWPA luncheon on May 30 in Gettysburg to give a brief acceptance speech.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

Tagged in: communication news
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