Waynesburg University’s Criminal Justice and Social Sciences Department recently welcomed two guests who brought legends of the Pittsburgh Mob to life. 

Ed Reiser and Bruce Teitelbaum, longtime experts in the field of criminal justice, visited Waynesburg University to share insight into the world of organized crime, or mob activity, with criminal justice administration students. They began by debunking the myths that organized crime exists only in cities like Chicago and New York.

“Pittsburgh also had a very active organized crime family that dates back to the turn of the 19th century at least,” said Reiser, a retired special agent for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Criminal Investigation Division.

As members of the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF), Reiser and Teitelbaum spent years unraveling cases involving the Pittsburgh Mob. 

According to Reiser, the investigations leading to the successful prosecution of members of the Genovese organized crime family in Pittsburgh spanned seven years, from 1984 through 1990, and resulted in the indictments of more than 60 individuals for 182 separate violations of federal laws.

After decades of investigating organized crime, both men agree on the secret to ending mob violence.

“When you are conducting an investigation of organized crime, you have to have an insider,” Reiser said. “If you try to use outsiders to testify, fear is always there to keep people from cooperating with the government.”

Reiser graduated from Robert Morris College in 1975 and immediately began working in the Examination Division of the IRS. He worked in the Criminal Investigation Division of the IRS from 1977 until his retirement in 2010. He has received eight awards for superior performance at the IRS and has been awarded numerous other honors from the OCDETF and other organizations.

Teitelbaum, who graduated from Duquesne Law School in 1980, worked as a United States Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania until his retirement in 2012. In this position, he served as the lead attorney and section chief for the Organized Crime and Narcotics sections. Teitelbaum was also the lead attorney for the OCDETF, and he now practices law at a private firm.

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_communication.jpgThe Waynesburg University Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) Chapter will host its fifth annual Public Relations Week from April 13 to 17. The week will consist of 12 programs, all of which will be held on the main campus of Waynesburg University.

Public Relations Week includes a series of professional development events and workshops intended for students pursuing communication-related fields. Prominent industry professionals will address audience members about the ever-changing field of public relations.

“PR Week is designed to provide our current students with knowledge of the public relations industry,” said Richard Krause, adviser for Waynesburg's PRSSA chapter and assistant professor and chair of the Department of Communication. “We scheduled a very diverse list of speakers in order to give students insight into as many fields of public relations as possible.”

This year’s programs feature speakers such as Elizabeth Bacheson, senior public relations and social media specialist at Elias/Savion Advertising, and Brian Price, assistant account executive at Edelman.

Public Relations Week will also include an alumni panel, a sports information panel presentation and an induction ceremony for new Chapter members.

The Chapter cordially invites all Waynesburg University students, faculty and staff interested in the fields of public relations, advertising, business or marketing. The event is also open to the general public interested in the field or networking with professionals.

Public Relations Week is sponsored by Waynesburg University’s PRSSA Chapter. PRSSA is an international, professional organization for students in communication-related fields. The organization strives to serve students, to enhance their educations, broaden their networks and launch their careers.

Most recently, the University’s PRSSA Chapter was awarded Star Chapter status for the second consecutive year. Out of PRSSA’s 350 plus chapters, 31 received Star Chapter status for the 2014 academic school year. This recognition is given to only the most prestigious of Chapters, categorizing them as the organization's top performers.

For more information, contact Megan Bayles at bay2547@student.waynesburg.edu.

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Lucas-Hathaway_2015_10_of_12.jpgThree Waynesburg University faculty members received the 2015 Lucas-Hathaway Teaching Excellence Awards during the University’s chapel service Tuesday, April 7.

The Lucas-Hathaway Teaching Excellence Awards are awarded annually. One recognizes a faculty member with a history of teaching excellence. A second award recognizes a faculty member with teaching excellence in introductory subjects, and the third award is given to a part-time faculty member at any Waynesburg University site.

Michael Cipoletti, Assistant Professor of Forensic Science, received the 2015 Lucas-Hathaway Teaching Excellence Award for a faculty member with a history of teaching excellence.

“Mike’s efforts to provide our undergraduates with novel research opportunities are notable,” said Evonne Baldauff, Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Assistant Professor of Chemistry. “He takes time to mentor each student, reviewing proper instrument usage and technique, requires students to investigate scientific literature, and encourages students to present their findings on campus and at regional conferences.”

Cipoletti joined the University in 2008 and holds a Master of Science degree from West Virginia University and a Bachelor of Science degree from Westminster College.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Lucas-Hathaway_2015_9_of_12.jpgMarietta Wright, Assistant Professor of Biology, received the 2015 Lucas-Hathaway Teaching Excellence Award for a faculty member with teaching excellence in introductory subjects.

“Dr. Wright consistently is recognized by her students for her commitment to excellence in student learning, particularly in her introductory Biology classes but also in more advanced courses,” said Dr. Jamie Jacobs, Dean for Institutional Effectiveness and Planning. “In addition, they cite her strengths as an advisor and as a faculty member who embodies the caring spirit of Waynesburg University.”

Wright joined the University in 2005 and holds a Ph.D. and a Master of Science degree from West Virginia University and a Bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Asheville.

Erin Martin received the 2015 Lucas-Hathaway Teaching Excellence Award for a non-full-time faculty member. Martin is a Lecturer in Nursing.

“Erin Martin is consistently described by students as an excellent clinical instructor who provides students with reality-based, real-world clinical experiences,” said Dr. Nancy Mosser, Professor of Nursing and Chair and Director of the Department of Nursing at Waynesburg University. “She holds students to high standards and is respected by them for her extensive background in critical care nursing. The Department of Nursing at Waynesburg University is fortunate to have Erin Martin as a clinical faculty member.”

b2ap3_thumbnail_Lucas-Hathaway_2015_5_of_12.jpgMartin joined the University in 2006 and holds a Master of Science in Nursing degree from Waynesburg University and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree from West Virginia University.

The Lucas-Hathaway Charitable Trust has established an endowed fund that provides two annual teaching excellence awards for full-time faculty members and one award for a part-time faculty member. Faculty members were nominated by students, faculty or alumni. Each recipient of the Lucas-Hathaway Award for Teaching Excellence received a commemorative plaque and a $1,200 award. The Trust is funded by J. Richard Lucas and C. Joan Hathaway Lucas, members of the class of 1950.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor
724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_campus-photo.jpgWaynesburg University will host its eighth annual Mini-Relay for Life Sunday, April 19, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. in the University’s Johnson Commons. 

Every spring, Waynesburg students rally together to generate awareness and raise funds for the American Cancer Society. A representative from each student group on campus must walk for an hour at a time, making sure a team member is always on the course. The public is cordially invited to attend and enjoy food, games and prizes.

During this year’s “Disney” themed relay, campus organizations sell food and products as well as host activities to engage the campus and community in the fundraising cause. Organizations are also encouraged to fundraise as teams or individually before the event.

“It is crucial for each student group to fundraise,” said Theresa Butler, junior accounting major and president of the Mini-Relay for Life. “Without each different club and organization, it would be impossible to host this event on campus and reach our overall goal.”

The event will commence with a morning service led by Reverend James Tinnemeyer, University chaplain and director of the Center for Leadership and Christian Ministry at the University and an opening ceremony led by University President Douglas G. Lee. 

According to Kelley Hardie, assistant dean of student services, Relay for Life gives the community hope because everyone is striving to make a difference in finding a cure for cancer. Every year, Hardie and the relay captains establish a certain monetary goal.

“This year we hope to reach an overall goal of $16,000,” said Hardie. “If every team reaches their individual goals, this will be 100 percent possible.”

The Mini Relay for Life will conclude with an acoustic Upper Room service and a closing ceremony with an American Cancer Society Representative.

“Everybody has someone in their life that has been touched by cancer,” said Megan Bayles, junior public relations major and vice president of the Mini-Relay for Life. “It is important for everyone to get involved in Relay for Life and help find a cure.” 

The 2015 Relay for Life officers are:

  • President: Theresa Butler, a senior accounting major from Uniontown, Pa. (Laurel Highlands Senior High School)
  • Vice President: Megan Bayles, a junior public relations major from Carmichaels, Pa. (Carmichaels Area Junior-Senior High School)
  • Survivorship: Nicole Zimmel, a junior early childhood education major from Slippery Rock, Pa. (Slippery Rock Area High School)
  • Online Chair: Brittany Orndoff, a senior secondary education major from Waynesburg, Pa. (Waynesburg Central High School)
  • Main Stage Chair: Emily Hoffman, a senior secondary education major from Salisbury, Md. (Salisbury Christian School)

For more information, contact Hardie at khardie@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3461.

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Waynesburg University’s fifth annual Undergraduate Research and Scholarly Work Symposium will be held Saturday, April 18, at 1 p.m. in Alumni Hall (Miller Hall, third floor). The event is open to the public and will showcase 23 student presenters, including two oral presentations and 14 poster presentations. 

The oral presentation session will begin at 1 p.m., and the poster session will run from 1:45 to 3 p.m. Refreshments will be available throughout both presentations.

“The purpose of this symposium is to provide a forum for academic scholars across disciplines to showcase their studies, to collaborate to identify novel ways ofb2ap3_thumbnail_Learn-More-CTA.png identifying problems or questions and to generate data that contributes to insightful solutions,” said Dr. Chad Sethman, associate professor of biology.

Topics will cover a variety of research and scholarly work from students of many majors and class years. A sample of the presentations include research about anthropogenic pollution, DNA samples, ergonomics in nursing, nutrition and supplements and the West Nile virus.

“The ultimate goal of the symposium is for the students to be able to make the transition from knowledge gained in the classroom to putting that knowledge to use to investigate questions and generate new information,” said Sethman. “Gaining proficiency at communicating their findings is also an important part of career development for our students.”

For more information, contact Sethman at 724-852-3265 or csethman@waynesburg.edu.

Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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