Alumni - Waynesburg University http://www.waynesburg.edu/outcomes/alumni Sun, 28 Aug 2016 07:54:11 -0400 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Alumni Spotlight: Zachary DiBeradin http://www.waynesburg.edu/blog?view=entry&id=1165 http://www.waynesburg.edu/blog?view=entry&id=1165 b2ap3_thumbnail_Zachary-DiBeradin.jpgWhen Zachary DiBeradin graduated from Waynesburg University in 2015, the interactive design major pictured himself putting his skills to work for a design firm or a photography studio, even a marketing firm. However, after landing a job in a completely different niche within his field, he is happily employed at Dick’s Sporting Goods in a way unlike he ever imagined.

DiBeradin is a learning media designer for Dick’s, where he works with a team of instructional designers, subject matter experts, vendors and management teams to provide learning solutions for the company. Many of their projects include electronic components, such as video series, where others are simply in-person trainings.

“My main role is to support the instructional designers with research and provide a solution to the need or demand,” said DiBeradin. “I primarily work on creating media that looks good and is also functional for the end user.”

Additionally, DiBeradin is a freelance designer and photographer in the Pittsburgh region.

He credits his Waynesburg University education and professors for all of his current professional opportunities.

“I am extremely grateful for the amount of exposure and portfolio building opportunities I received during my time at Waynesburg,” said DiBeradin. “I would like to thank all of my professors that have prepared me by giving me relevant knowledge from people who have first-hand experience in the industry.”

DiBeradin was most influenced by Dr. Chad Sherman, assistant professor of communication, Kristine Schiffbauer, instructor of communication, and Richard Krause, assistant professor of communication and chair of the Department of Communication.

“They gave me opportunities that I wouldn’t have been able to find anywhere else,” he said. “They taught me how to further my knowledge by pushing myself to be better at everything I do; to challenge myself and to always be open to new things.”

Since entering the workforce, DiBeradin has learned that his work can make a difference in the lives of others. He takes pride in the fact that his work can directly help people, as well as an entire company, develop.

“I’m always happy that I can make a difference in the way someone learns,” said DiBeradin. “It is always rewarding to be able to challenge people and make them think about different situations through media.”

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mstultz@waynesburg.edu (Matthew Stultz) Alumni Mon, 22 Aug 2016 14:01:51 -0400
Alumni Spotlight: Jelena Kyle http://www.waynesburg.edu/blog?view=entry&id=1163 http://www.waynesburg.edu/blog?view=entry&id=1163 b2ap3_thumbnail_7-11-ACS-Regional-Mtg-JK.jpgIn a few short weeks, Jelena Kyle, recent forensic science alumna, will be continuing her education across the Atlantic Ocean. Kyle will be pursuing a master’s degree in forensic science at Northumbria University in the United Kingdom.

Kyle first learned of Northumbria through Dr. Evonne Balduaff, associate professor of chemistry and chair of the Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science, who, at the time, was exploring a future study abroad program with the school.

“We would always joke that I was going to go there for graduate school, but I don’t think either of us thought that one day I actually would,” said Kyle.

Baldauff and Michael Cipoletti, assistant professor of forensic science, once visited Northumbria and upon their return, shared how amazing it was as a school. This was when Kyle made a decision that Northumbria was where she wanted to continue her education.

Kyle’s professors at Waynesburg have helped shape her into the person she has become today. In addition to Baldauff and Cipoletti, Kelly Wilczynski, chemical hygiene officer and safety coordinator, and Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science, have become personal and academic influencers to Kyle.

In addition to being her professor, Baldauff was her research advisor and saw firsthand the amount of time and dedication that Kyle devoted to her studies in the chemistry lab.

“I am surprised that she didn’t get sick of me for how much time I spent up there on the fifth floor of Stewart Hall,” said Kyle. “The joke was that I was either going to become the mascot or that I should just bring my mattress and move in.”

Musko was Kyle’s biggest cheerleader and the one who pushed her harder every day to do her best. Another friend and Kyle coined the phrase, “Musko Wednesdays,” which became a time when they held conversations with Musko in her office about anything from school to politics to TV.

“It might not seem like much, but it was honestly one of the biggest stress relievers for me,” said Kyle.

Kyle credits the structure of Waynesburg’s forensic science curriculum for helping her with choosing a career. At Waynesburg, students experience all disciplines in the forensic science field rather than being forced to choose a specific discipline from the start.

“Not many colleges other than Waynesburg offer this,” said Kyle. “I was able to study a little bit of every division so I would be better suited to then pick what it was I wanted to do as a career.”

Indeed, that is how Kyle decided that she wanted to become a latent fingerprint examiner and work for the counterfeiting division of the Secret Service.

In September, Kyle will begin her coursework at Northumbria, and she is very eager to do so.

“I think I am most excited about going to a different country for my degree,” said Kyle. “I am going to learn so much over there, not just from my new professors, but from the culture and area.”

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mstultz@waynesburg.edu (Matthew Stultz) Alumni Mon, 22 Aug 2016 12:46:04 -0400
Alumni Spotlight: Mary Hoffman http://www.waynesburg.edu/blog?view=entry&id=1155 http://www.waynesburg.edu/blog?view=entry&id=1155 b2ap3_thumbnail_Mary-Hoffman.jpgEnglish (secondary education, creative writing) alumna, Mary Hoffman, is headed to Dayton, Ohio, to pursue her passion for teaching and learning. Hoffman was accepted to the University of Dayton’s Lalanne Program, a two-year graduate program with a tuition-free master’s degree, accompanied with two years of teaching in an urban Catholic school.

Over the next two years, Hoffman will teach sixth and seventh-grade students and engage in research.

“I am excited to continue my passion for research by conducting a two-part action research for my graduate degree,” said Hoffman, whose research will examine the effects of daily writing on seventh-grade classroom reading levels. “The research will be part of my teaching experience, so I can apply what I am learning in my courses directly toward my career.”

The support that Hoffman received from the faculty in Waynesburg’s Department of English and Foreign Languages and Department of Education encouraged her career choice in education and research.

“My professors were encouraging and supportive at Waynesburg and always had my best interest at heart,” she said. “I’m confident that Waynesburg has fully prepared me for both my first year of teaching and the coursework at University of Dayton.”

Additionally, Hoffman worked at the Writing Center and helped both undergraduate and graduate students with their papers; this where she learned the best practices to teach writing to others. Jill Moyer Sunday, director of the Writing Center, helped further Hoffman’s interest in research by encouraging her to present at the International Writing Centers Association Conference.

Stepping out of her comfort zone, Hoffman was a copy editor for the student-run newspaper, The Yellow Jacket, for one year, which exposed her to a different style of writing. She was also a member of the orientation board as an orientation leader, the senior class gift committee and the Student Activities Board.

Waynesburg’s mission of faith, learning and serving had a profound impact on Hoffman during her time at the University.

“Waynesburg’s mission shaped my classroom experience, therefore, shaping my career, even as a graduate student,” she said. “The professors at Waynesburg incorporated faith, learning and serving into their everyday lives, something I hope to do for my students, as well."

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mstultz@waynesburg.edu (Matthew Stultz) Alumni Wed, 27 Jul 2016 13:42:51 -0400
From the PAC to the Olympic Games: Trainer-athlete remembers WU’s influence on her goals http://www.waynesburg.edu/blog?view=entry&id=1065 http://www.waynesburg.edu/blog?view=entry&id=1065 b2ap3_thumbnail_Lori-Uretsky.jpgLori Uretsky’s life is made up of goals. She sets a goal, works hard and achieves it nearly every time. Then, she sets a new one and begins again.

Today, her goal is to get the USA Women’s National Field Hockey Team to and through the 2016 Olympics. Keeping her team healthy during the most important competition of their lives will the ultimate reward for Uretsky as an athletic trainer.

“I think it’s important to have short-term goals and long-term ideas,” she said. “Right now, I am focused on doing whatever it is I can to keep the Women’s National Team healthy and training as we prepare for the 2016 Olympic Games.”

When she entered Waynesburg University in 1994 as a sports medicine major and a biology minor, Uretsky’s hope was to become a successful student athlete. She played softball for Waynesburg for four years, graduating with 18 school records. She was also named the President’s Athletic Conference (PAC) Freshman of the Year in 1995, All-Conference all four years, PAC Player of the Week twice and softball team captain her senior year.

Uretsky’s career goals were clear to her during the entire course of her Waynesburg education. She worked as a student athletic trainer for the school, and she knew that when she graduated she wanted to work as an athletic trainer at the NCAA Division I level – a trainer for a college or university whose name everyone knew. It was this goal she identified when one of her professors told a group of students to write a letter to themselves in five years.

“My goals throughout my time at Waynesburg never changed,” said Uretsky. “I remember speaking to [my professor] several times about how to reach that goal, how much it meant to me and if I believed it was possible. Five years after I graduated, I received my letter from [her], and upon opening it, I had achieved all that I wanted.”

Uretsky graduated from Waynesburg in 1998 and became a Board-Certified Athletic Trainer in 1999. She then landed her dream job, fulfilling her NCAA Division I goal, as an athletic trainer for several sports teams at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, and worked there for 10 years.

Uretsky largely credits Waynesburg for her success both at Bucknell University and in her current position.

“Waynesburg is with me every day,” she said. “The education I had is still utilized every time I step foot into the athletic training room or onto the field hockey pitch. Waynesburg helped me learn how to return an athlete back to playing following an injury, how to discuss injuries with coaches and how important trust is with the people you work with. As a student athletic trainer and a student athlete, I learned first-hand just how important the relationship between an athletic trainer and an athlete can be.” 

Now, as the Head Athletic Trainer for the Women’s National Field Hockey Team, Uretsky ensures the care, prevention, evaluation, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries and illnesses. She is responsible for covering practices and games, which includes travelling around the world with the team. She coordinates athletic trainer coverage for Junior National Field Hockey teams and liaises with the United States Anti-Doping Agency and the World Anti-Doping Agency to ensure the team complies, and she works with the United States Olympic Committee.

“I am very fortunate to travel the globe with an amazing group of staff and athletes,” Uretsky said. “I enjoy the interaction of meeting new people and bringing fans to [field hockey] and meeting other medical professionals from the various countries we play.”

After the Olympics, Uretsky hopes to take vacation time to travel to countries she hasn’t seen, and then she plans to return to USA Field Hockey.

Today, while Uretsky can say she has met or exceeded many of the goals she set years ago, she knows the future is uncertain. She is preparing for the coming years with the attitude that she can still achieve success by taking one day at a time.

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studentblogbas6097@student.waynesburg.edu (Kimberly Baston) Alumni Wed, 18 Nov 2015 15:13:49 -0500
Alumni Spotlight: Hayden Giuliani http://www.waynesburg.edu/blog?view=entry&id=1052 http://www.waynesburg.edu/blog?view=entry&id=1052 b2ap3_thumbnail_Giuliani.jpgWaynesburg University alumna Hayden Giuliani is an athlete at heart. She maintained her passion for sports by playing basketball throughout her career at Waynesburg. After four years with dedicated mentors, however, Giuliani determined that she does not just want to play sports – she wants to help make life better for other athletes.

Giuliani began her college journey as an athletic training major and eventually added an exercise science major during her junior year as she discovered more about her calling. She is now enrolled at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), pursuing a graduate degree in exercise physiology.

“I’m excited, especially because I think Waynesburg provided me with a strong physiology background and the confidence to succeed at the next level,” said Giuliani.

Giuliani names Dr. Bryan Hamilton, a professor of biology at the University, as one of her primary positive influencers. Along with other coaches and professors, Hamilton encouraged Giuliani to aim high, which Giuliani said has worked out quite well.

Giuliani loves her chosen field because of the opportunities to serve others as an athletic trainer.

“I think this field helps people tremendously,” she said. “We have the opportunity to meet people where they are in their lives, hear what their goals are and help them through every step of the process. I know how it feels to be on both sides of this relationship, and being the helper brings more joy than anything else.”

With options including athletic training, coaching, teaching and more open to her, Giuliani has not nailed down which specific career path she will choose.  She plans to use her experiences at UNC to slim down the list of possibilities.

“I am hoping my time at UNC will narrow my interests and open doors of opportunity that will ultimately guide my path after graduation,” she said. “But I see myself as a teacher or basketball coach, while also working with strength training and exercise.”

Giuliani feels her Waynesburg education pushed her to take risks and introspectively determine the best path to success for herself.

“I’ve learned to step outside my comfort box and take the extra step,” said Giuliani. “In that way, as a person, I am stronger, more open to ideas and willing to do whatever it takes to succeed.”

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studentblogbas6097@student.waynesburg.edu (Kimberly Baston) Alumni Mon, 26 Oct 2015 14:00:14 -0400